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Cookin again

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Good thing I went today- Dad’s oyster poboy contained the last oysters they had! Their next shipment comes in some time tomorrow. I might have walked in to find they had none.

(And yes, he made it disappear like a magic trick.)
 

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Zardnaar

Legend
Good thing I went today- Dad’s oyster poboy contained the last oysters they had! Their next shipment comes in some time tomorrow. I might have walked in to find they had none.

(And yes, he made it disappear like a magic trick.)
Would it make you cry to learn you can get lobster, oysters, mussels off the rocks here?

Problem was I don't like seafood espicially shellfish. Varies a bit depending on what's on any particular beach.


Used to collect Paua (Abalone), oysters, mussels as a kid. Bleah. Sisters partner had wetsuit and diving gear.

Went hungry more than once when dinner was seafood pizza or lobster.
 
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Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Would it make you cry to learn you can get lobster, oysters, mussels off the rocks here?

Problem was I don't like seafood espicially shellfish. Varies a bit depending on what's on any particular beach.


Used to collect Paua (Abalone), oysters, mussels as a kid. Bleah. Sisters partner had wetsuit and diving gear.

Went hungry more than once when dinner was seafood pizza or lobster.
Cry? Nah. Despite being a seafood lover, I’ve spent most of my life faaaaaaaar from the water. I’m used to not necessarily having what I wan’t.

But jealous? YES!
 

Zardnaar

Legend
I eat vegetarian over fish. Good beaches locally, lagoon and beach 10-15 minutes away.

Just couldn't get into it. Piece of fried battered blue cod/sole or hoki once in a blue moon.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
I eat vegetarian over fish. Good beaches locally, lagoon and beach 10-15 minutes away.

Just couldn't get into it. Piece of fried battered blue cod/sole or hoki once in a blue moon.
No shame in that.

My paternal grandfather, despite being a native, lifelong New Orleanean, didn’t particularly care for seafood himself. He preferred a Louisiana-style meat & potatoes diet.

His one exception was oysters on the half shell, which he and his best friend could suck them down in heroic portions. They once got kicked out of an all-you-can-eat seafood bar for depleting the kitchen’s supply. “Your meals are free, but you gotta go now...and don’t come back.”
 

Zardnaar

Legend
No shame in that.

My paternal grandfather, despite being a native, lifelong New Orleanean, didn’t particularly care for seafood himself. He preferred a Louisiana-style meat & potatoes diet.

His one exception was oysters on the half shell, which he and his best friend could suck them down in heroic portions. They once got kicked out of an all-you-can-eat seafood bar for depleting the kitchen’s supply. “Your meals are free, but you gotta go now...and don’t come back.”
Oysters stupidly expensive here. Fish and Chip shops sometimes sell them.

Hard pressed to find them that's easy to get to now.

Families from the Marlborough sounds, used to be remote so could find them late 90s but Airbnb/tourism ruined it.

School trips to beach Maori friend ate shellfish raw straight off the rocks. Fresh I suppose.

28 second mark used to fish off the jetty. Native Bush covered hills, ocean.


Scramble along the rocks and see what you find.
 

trappedslider

Adventurer
so, I made the nuka-cola recipe from the Fallout cookbook, and well i found it to be bland. The Nuka-cola bbq sauce however is good and i'll be using it for my july 4th cooking.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
In other “news”, the lady selling the bourbon peaches was back at the Farmers’ Market for the first time since the pandemic erupted. She had ‘em, I bought ‘em.

Good thing, too, ‘cause I finished off the last of the jar I had. Up to this point, I’d just put them on the ice cream with pecans and dig in. This time, however, I added chocolate syrup to the mix.

The sundaes without chocolate were damn good. Adding the chocolate? Well, it definitely didn’t ruin it! I can’t say which way I preferred it. It was interesting how the chocolate brought out some of the smokier flavors in the bourbon, but also muted the peaches a little.
 
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prabe

Aspiring Lurker (He/Him)
Supporter
In other “news”, the lady selling the bourbon peaches was back at the Farmers’ Market for the first time since the pandemic erupted. She had ‘em, I bought ‘em.

Good thing, too, ‘cause I finished off the last of the jar I had. Up to this point, I’d just put them on the ice cream with pecans and dig in. This time, however, I added chocolate syrup to the mix.

The sundaes without chocolate were damn good. Adding the chocolate? Well, ir definitely didn’t ruin it! I can’t say which way I preferred it. It was interesting how the chocolate brought out some of the smokier flavors in the bourbon, but also muted the peaches a little.
Sounds like a different sort of good.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Sounds like a different sort of good.
It really was.

The version sans chocolate was lighter. More...refreshing.

Adding the chocolate seemed more serious. Richer. More...decadent? I imagine a ”chefier“ cook who liked dark chocolate could take this in a truly standout dessert.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Sausage stroganoff for dinner tonight:


Ingredients:

1 box Pasta
olive oil
2 lb Sausage, cut into medallions (I used a simple, smoked country sausage)
1 package medium Portobello mushrooms, sliced
1 medium Yellow onion, diced
1 bunch Green onion, sliced relatively thin
1 bulb of garlic, cleaned, crushed & gross chopped
1 lg Jalapeño, as finely chopped as possible*
1/2 bunch of fresh parsley
1 lg tablespoon dried parsley
1 can beef broth
1 can cream of mushrooms soup
1/3 container Sour cream
1.5 tablespoon Paprika
Salt & Black pepper to taste


Cooking Gear:
Stock pot
Spider or Lg slotted spoon
6qt or bigger straight-sided sauté pan or Dutch oven
Lg spoon
3-4 small mixing bowls
small spatula or spurtle


After slicing your ingredients, you can set them aside in bowls for control: 1 with the onions, garlic & pepper; 1 with the sausage, one with the mushrooms. (The rest can simply wait on the cutting board.)

Coat bottom of the sauté pan/Dutch oven with a thin layer of olive oil. Sauté your sausage medallions over medium heat, stirring occasionally until you get a little color on them and some browning on your pot. Remove the medallions and deglaze the pan with @1/4 of beef broth.

Start boiling your pasta in the stock pot. Monitor this carefully so as not to over or undercook the pasta. When it’s cooked, use your spider or slotted spoon to remove it from the pot into one of the mixing bowls- the timing is such that one WILL be empty.

Sauté the mix of onions, garlic and jalapeño over medium heat until they start to soften and there is more browning in your pan. Deglaze with 1/4 of beef broth again and add mushrooms, cooking until they start to soften. Add the parsley, then return the sausage to the pan.

Mix quickly, then add cream of mushroom soup. Use the last of your beef broth and your spatula to rinse out the soup can, and add that to the pan. Add the paprika and 1/3 container of sour cream to the pan, then give the pot a thorough mixing.

Taste and season with salt & pepper.

Add the pasta to the sauté pan with all the other ingredients. Gently mix it in so that it will all be coated with sauce, but the pasta won’t be broken.

Remove from heat and let stand a few minutes, then plate.





* the finer the chop, the more evenly the jalapeño’s flavor and heat will be distributed.
 
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prabe

Aspiring Lurker (He/Him)
Supporter
Sausage stroganoff for dinner tonight:
That's going to be ... there's a type of sausage you use that I gather is similar to andouille, but isn't andouille and it's fallen out of my head. Looks really good. I'm not a big fan of mushrooms, but I'll cope if it's Stroganoff.

Our dinner tonight was variant sawmill gravy (made with chorizo, with sauteed onion and bell pepper) on pita bread. Not as involved as Stroganoff, but tasty.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
That's going to be ... there's a type of sausage you use that I gather is similar to andouille, but isn't andouille and it's fallen out of my head. Looks really good. I'm not a big fan of mushrooms, but I'll cope if it's Stroganoff.

Our dinner tonight was variant sawmill gravy (made with chorizo, with sauteed onion and bell pepper) on pita bread. Not as involved as Stroganoff, but tasty.
I just used a simple smoked country sausage for this. People were scared when I said there was a jalapeño in there, but I diced it so finely, it’s heat and flavor were well distributed.
 

prabe

Aspiring Lurker (He/Him)
Supporter
I just used a simple smoked country sausage for this. People were scared when I said there was a jalapeño in there, but I diced it so finely, it’s heat and flavor were well distributed.
Fair enough. You use enough of that other sausage that I just presumed. Sorry. (Also, please refresh my memory?)

Also, worried about one jalapeño in a batch of Stroganoff? That sounds like some of my middle-age or older whitebread relatives. ;-)
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Fair enough. You use enough of that other sausage that I just presumed. Sorry. (Also, please refresh my memory?)
I use a variety of sausages in my cooking, including a Louisiana hot sausage. (FWIW, I edited in the recipe in the original Stroganoff post!)

News flash: I love sausage! Unfortunately I love it a lot more than anyone else in the family, so I can only get certain ones when dining out.

Also, worried about one jalapeño in a batch of Stroganoff? That sounds like some of my middle-age or older whitebread relatives. ;-)
While I have a respectable heat tolerance, I’m currently unique in the house in that regard. Our houseguest is an Irish American stereotype, my Dad has never been big on heat (always got mild Popeye’s chicken), and a thrush infection killed Mom’s heat tolerance a few years ago.

It WAS the biggest, fattest jalapeño I could find, though. But I diced it as finely as I could in order to distribute the pepper’s flavor and heat as evenly as possible. Old chef’s trick I learned a long time ago, but strongly reinforced in an episode of Anthony Bourdain’s No Reservations.

Whatever the seasoning or ingredient, that superfine distribution prevents big chunks of it from landing on your tongue. That leads to subtlety of flavor with most things, but with peppers, it also means nobody gets a sudden rude surprise. That also means- as Bourdain’s guest pointed out- you can use MORE of the peppers, emphasizing their flavor over the impact of their heat.

The reverse being true as well, of course, is why so many chefs use big flaky kosher or sea salt for finishing or as a table seasoning. Big flakes = big flavor impact. The same principle applies in things like Indian cuisine, where some spices are barely processed before inclusion in a dish.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Did a rib roast & baked some diced baby Yukon golds to go with it, along with some leftover collard greens. Because I forgot to label its mass when I put it in the freezer, I had to guess its size, so it undercooked just a mite. Brightside: that means it won’t be OVERcooked when the leftovers are reheated. There’s five 1” thick boneless ribeye steaks in my fridge now, plus a decent sized slab of beef ribs.

Hmmm...if Dad doesn’t go caveman on those ribs, I might use them to make a stew or some such...
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
When I was cleaning up after my rib roast last night, I noticed a pool of grease under the roasting pan. I assumed I had just been extra clumsy transferring the meat from the pan to the cutting board. I had a lot of other dishes to do, so I didn’t get to cleaning that pan last night,

So I thought nothing of it when I set it to soak today. Well, I just noticed a puddle of soapy water on the floor next to where the pan was soaking. At first, I thought I had merely continued in my clumsinesss and not noticed me splashing when I poured. So I toweled it up, and put the towel in the laundry room.

...only to be told I missed a lot. Sure enough, there was another puddle,

My big, deep Le Creuset ceramic roasting pan had an 8” long hairline crack that was seeping. Doubly irritating, it was mom scored for $50 in a clearance sale.

A moment of silence.
 

prabe

Aspiring Lurker (He/Him)
Supporter
@Dannyalcatraz That's a bummer. You can get replacements for not-crazy amounts of money (Calphalon make a nice one for ~$100, IIRC), but it sounds like a bit of a mess in the present.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
I don’t know that I NEED to. I have a lot of pots. And while that one was damn convenient, I have reasonable substitutes...some of which I haven’t used since I bought them,
 


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