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D&D and the rising pandemic

Ryujin

Hero
In America isn't it easier to fire people eg if your boss doesn't like the colour of your shoelaces?
It varies, State to State. In "Right to Work" States you can fire people for nothing at all. In other words you can pretty much fire someone for anything, as long as you aren't obvious about it being an explicitly disallowed reason. At least that's how I view it from the outside, looking in.
 

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Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
In America isn't it easier to fire people eg if your boss doesn't like the colour of your shoelaces?

That depends on where you are, and what your contractual relationship with the employer is like.

Here they can ask to see your ACC history which documents your injuries basically since your were born. I applied for a job and it had a fractured finger from 1992 high school on it.

You don't have to provide it but they don't have to hire you either.

In the US, the Americans with Disabilities Act (a.k.a. the ADA) places strict limitations on what an employer can ask. In general, they can ask if you are able to complete job-relevant tasks, like, "Can you regularly lift loads of 50 pounds?" if they expect you to be working in a warehouse. But they do not get to see general lists of medical records.

Note that in the US, there is no such thing as centralized medical data, no one master list of your medical history that anyone can refer to. Your information is scattered among the various medical facilities you may have visited in your life, and the various insurance companies you have used.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
It varies, State to State. In "Right to Work" States ...

I think you mean "Employment at will". We should note that "Employment at will" is a sort of default state - in any such state, you may still have a contract (especially in a union shop) that requires giving cause for dismissal.

"Right to work," in the US is a doctrine that a worker's union cannot place employment restrictions on non-union employees - most commonly, they cannot require non-union employees pay fees to the union, even if the non-union employee benefits from the collective bargaining of the union.
 
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Ryujin

Hero
I think you mean "Employment at will". We should note that "Employment at will" is a sort of default state - in any such state, you may still have a contract (especially in a union shop) that requires giving cause for dismissal.

"Right to work," in the US is a doctrine that a worker's union cannot place employment restrictions on non-union employees - most commonly, they cannot require non-union employees pay fees to the union, even if the non-union employee benefits from the collective bargaining of the union.
I keep hearing the terms "At Will Employment" and "Right to Work" used essentially interchangeably. I don't know if that's legally or doctrinally correct. I do know that it should more appropriately be called something like "Right to Fire", because that's essentially what it is. It's not like a worker has ever been required to give a legal reason to quit their job.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
I keep hearing the terms "At Will Employment" and "Right to Work" used essentially interchangeably.

Yeah, well, people get sloppy. In the broader world, "Right to work" is a more positive thing about human rights. Folks have a right to make a living, basically. Unfortunately in the US, the term got co-opted in the power struggles between employers and unions. Further than that, and the discussion probably gets political, and union history isn't what the thread's about.

I don't know if that's legally or doctrinally correct. I do know that it should more appropriately be called something like "Right to Fire", because that's essentially what it is. It's not like a worker has ever been required to give a legal reason to quit their job.

While in current practice, it comes out a lot like "right to fire", in historical context we should not underestimate the ability of a wealthy employer to find a way to bludgeon employees if allowed to do so. If you do not establish that a worker does actually have a right to leave a job, then employees who try to go to, say, a competitor, could be legally harassed.
 


Zardnaar

Legend
Or they think your toes are too long.... by and large in most states the idea of workers being protected seems mostly myth.

Ah a lot harder to fire someone here. There's a disputes tribunal that sides with the employee around 70% of the time.

You can't get fired on the spot at least without the risk of having to pay out.

If a boss cares about mandatory vaccinations they can add it to the health and safety guidelines or the government can mandate it for certain professions or public sector type jobs.

US presidents more powerful internationally at least from government pov not military, Primeministers seem to have more power internally if they can convince their party to go along with it.
 

Hussar

Legend
Well that’s part and parcel of the parliamentary system and how strong party whips are. In Canada we basically elect four year dictatorships.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
Well that’s part and parcel of the parliamentary system and how strong party whips are. In Canada we basically elect four year dictatorships.

They used emergency laws here from the 1950's and rushed some laws through.

PMs also done some thing that haven't been done since 1938.

People kinda forget that when push comes to shove.....
 



CapnZapp

Legend
Wasn't there a law where Parliament forbade a new election before five years had passed, unless two thirds voted to hold an early election?

And when the new PM wanted a pop election (or whatever it's called) they simply changed the law to add "every five years or next Thursday whichever is closest"... (paraphrasing) which only required a simple majority! :) :) :)
 

Ryujin

Hero
Well that’s part and parcel of the parliamentary system and how strong party whips are. In Canada we basically elect four year dictatorships.
Except when there's a minority government. Then we seem to actually get reasonable leadership, because everyone is too scared to upset the apple cart.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
Wasn't there a law where Parliament forbade a new election before five years had passed, unless two thirds voted to hold an early election?

And when the new PM wanted a pop election (or whatever it's called) they simply changed the law to add "every five years or next Thursday whichever is closest"... (paraphrasing) which only required a simple majority! :) :) :)

What country are you referring to?
 


That's the sort of thing that I've been wondering about: Does the current world situation mean that it's easier to game, online, than it was to try and get the group together physically? Despite having many of the resources that you mention (Discord, Roll20, Fantasy Grounds/FGUnity), I've not been playing. I have, however, picked up a few rule sets to play around with, most notably the second edition of Demon Hunters and the new releases of TORG, both of which are pretty cinematic in style, though in markedly different ways.

My D&Ding has increased during the pandemic. Before COVID I had an in-person gaming group, but our get-togethers were irregular. The pandemic dissolved that group. But I then became part of a Roll20 group that meets every week. The end result is that my gaming is much more regular and frequent. One of my kids is also now in a virtual D&D campaign that was started by another parent to increase socialization.
 

Ryujin

Hero
My D&Ding has increased during the pandemic. Before COVID I had an in-person gaming group, but our get-togethers were irregular. The pandemic dissolved that group. But I then became part of a Roll20 group that meets every week. The end result is that my gaming is much more regular and frequent. One of my kids is also now in a virtual D&D campaign that was started by another parent to increase socialization.
I was wondering if that might not be the case for some people. My own usual group hasn't gotten together in more than 5 years now, because life got in the way. It became impossible for most to get together on a regular basis and things just sort of fell apart. Back then I even set up a computer for remote access via Skype, with camera, so that two of the players who could only be remote at the time would have a virtual "seat" at the table. Two sessions and they were pretty much done, despite the remote access working very well.

I did mis speak earlier, when I said that I hadn't been playing at all. There were a couple of months, December through January, in which I was playing via Roll20 with some folks I met on the Zombie Orpheus Discord channel. The DM was from Cannes, FR and the other two players were from Knoxville, TN, US. Made for some pretty interesting sessions but, unfortunately, the DM travels a fair bit for work and things have fallen by the wayside.
 

Cadence

Legend
Supporter
I thought of starting a new thread for this question, but it didn't seem right when this one already existed. How is everyone maintaining their sanity, more than a year into this mess? What hobbies have you been practicing? Have you been making use of online gaming tools? Other things?

On-line has made it easy to get a game going for my 11yo and two of his friends (in person with driving in a non-COVID year might have been trouble). Google meet.

Got back into a D&D for the first time in quite a while. Discord (Avrae) and zoom for sharing a map and video/audio. The players are in multiple states so this game wouldn't have fired without the on-line things.

MtG has been saved by not-quite-weekly commander games using zoom (video) and discord (sound). [Spelltable didn't work well]. Really miss being able to go to the shop for that.
 

Ryujin

Hero
On-line has made it easy to get a game going for my 11yo and two of his friends (in person with driving in a non-COVID year might have been trouble). Google meet.

Got back into a D&D for the first time in quite a while. Discord (Avrae) and zoom for sharing a map and video/audio. The players are in multiple states so this game wouldn't have fired without the on-line things.

MtG has been saved by not-quite-weekly commander games using zoom (video) and discord (sound). [Spelltable didn't work well]. Really miss being able to go to the shop for that.
Zoom has been a minor saviour in these times. I haven't been able to visit the West Coast, however, I've been able to meet with friends there via Zoom. I have a witchy friend there who does occasional meets on the Celtic festival days, and such. Usually just 4-8 of us for an hour or two.
 

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
Employers can indeed ask about symptoms, C19 vaccination status, and related questions. But they also have to safeguard that information- there are strict limits to how and with whom they can share such info.

(Caveat: if the employee overshares information with the employer, the employer isn’t required to toss/disregard such information. The employer must still treat it with the same safeguards as the employee’s other information, though.)




COVID-19: What Employers Need to Know About HIPAA

I read this article today.

 

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