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D&D 5E D&D 'frequently asked' questions?

R_J_K75

Hero
invisibility?
Agree. Can a caster cast invisibility on themselves? As a DM I'd rule yes but RAW I'd say no. Greater Invisibility says you or a target...little things like this really confuse things sometimes.

 

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aco175

Legend
What each skill allows and when. When you use Athletics over Acrobatics, or Perception instead of Investigation. How certain classes have one on their class list and not the other and how to handle this.

How to choose a race and what that means. Is race just a set of abilities on a human frame? Does an elf look at the world differently than a orc or human? I know a lot of books are just giving set bonuses now, but should they?

Spells. Help choosing spells at each level and how to get more versatility out of non-combat stuff. Why take burning hands and not magic missile or visa-versa.
 

Lanefan

Victoria Rules
Agree. Can a caster cast invisibility on themselves? As a DM I'd rule yes but RAW I'd say no. Greater Invisibility says you or a target...little things like this really confuse things sometimes.

"A creature you touch..." - you the caster are a creature, right? You are, one must assume, always within your own reach, right? You thus can always cast "touch" range spells on yourself, end of story.

Any other interpretation is beyond ridicule.
 

R_J_K75

Hero
"A creature you touch..." - you the caster are a creature, right? You are, one must assume, always within your own reach, right? You thus can always cast "touch" range spells on yourself, end of story.

Any other interpretation is beyond ridicule.
Correct and thats what I would think too. Its a rule under the magic description for touch attacks/spells and not the spell description and I just feel its poorly worded. So the Greater invisibility is stating you and target to say this spell effects more than one creature. Its the way the book is laid out that you have to hunt and peck for information to get the whole story that confuses things imo.
 



Stormonu

Legend
Casting two spells - in that you can cast two spells in a round only if one is a bonus action AND one of the spells is a leveled spell (1st - 9th) and the other is a cantrip.

For example, you can cast Healing Word, a 1st level spell that uses a bonus action, and also attack with Poison Spray as a cantrip using an action in the same round.

It took me a good long while to understand how that was feasible, and then explain it (several times) to others.[/I]
 

Stormonu

Legend
Oh, and properly using Hit Dice over in-combat magical healing). A lot of people gloss over using HD to heal between encounters takes a lot of pressure off the healer, and saves tons of money on healing potions.
 

"What's Session Zero?"
"Does it matter if we surround an enemy?"
"How does passive perception work?"
"How many spells can I cast in a round?"
"How do you stack advantage and disadvantage?"
"What Bonus Actions can I do?"
"How does the Multi-attack action work? How does it stack/interact with Extra Action or Haste or...?"
"What is the difference between Rules and Rulings?"
"Do I have to take an action to be hidden?"
"If something is hidden, do I have to take an action to perceive them?"
"What's the difference of being hidden and being out of sight?"
"Can I target a creature if I can't see them? What about with an Area of Effect?"
"If a spell 'targets a creature' can I target a door/object?"
 



ECMO3

Explorer
"A creature you touch..." - you the caster are a creature, right? You are, one must assume, always within your own reach, right? You thus can always cast "touch" range spells on yourself, end of story.

Any other interpretation is beyond ridicule.
Mage Armor is worded the same way and that is obviously something intended for a caster to cast on himself.
 

Zaukrie

New Publisher
More questions:
Can I move before and after I attack?
Why can't I do that (which was really, why can't I do more than 1 opportunity attack, or reaction, or bonus action on someone else's turn)
Can I shoot at someone I can't see (which was really them trying to shoot at someone that was around a corner, or in another room, just not understanding the context of walls and stuff at all)
How do I calculate that (anything D&DBeyond didn't do, or if they wanted to know how to apply proficiency bonuses on their own)
 

Laurefindel

Legend
Recently.for me, there has been a lot of "when I conjure a creature, summon a familiar, find a steed, ride a horse, direct an animal companion, or just release my hounds...

does that creature take it's own place in the initiative or acts on mine?
which action can it take on it's own?
do I have to take an action to command it, or a bonus action, or does it requires no action from me?
if I gave it a command the previous round, does it keep doing it this round?
if it's acting on its free will, do I play the creature or is the DM playing it?
who decides if the creature refuses to obey my command, or acts against my will or that of my group?
when I fall unconscious, do I still have to command it or does it acts on it's own? Does it disappear?
can someone else command my creature?


While I know most of it, it takes an effort to make sense of it all. I can't wait for 6e's unified theory of sidekick/summons controlling.
 
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Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
Agree. Can a caster cast invisibility on themselves? As a DM I'd rule yes but RAW I'd say no. Greater Invisibility says you or a target...little things like this really confuse things sometimes.

RAW Says,

"TARGETING YOURSELF
If a spell targets a creature of your choice, you can choose yourself, unless the creature must be hostile or specifically a creature other than you. If you are in the area of effect of a spell you cast, you can target yourself."

A creature you can touch is also a creature of your choice. The difference in wording is just one more example of 5e being vague and inconsistent.
 


R_J_K75

Hero
A creature you can touch is also a creature of your choice. The difference in wording is just one more example of 5e being vague and inconsistent.
I think Invisibility is a good example of the sometimes poor and confusing writing of 5E. If the spell description opened with "The target...it would be alot clearer. I would never have even considered "wait the caster has to pick a target and cant cast it on themselves?"

For me 5E is difficult to remember the rules sometimes because as someone who played previous editions the subtle changes they made were hard to even recognize on first reading.
 

What are the areas of D&D that new players would find a short article explaining how it works useful?

Like -- "How do Opportunity Attacks work?" and so on. What are the pain points for new players, which they might google an answer for?

(I ask, because I plan to commission an article series doing exactly this - already lined up are opportunity attacks, exhaustion, concentration, and stealth).
Really, how combat goes in general. They Player's Handbook does an extremely poor job of explaining this.
 

R_J_K75

Hero
Really, how combat goes in general. They Player's Handbook does an extremely poor job of explaining this.
IDR, does the PHB give an example? Pretty sure in previous editions they usually include a " DM, and players x, y, & z" step by step example of what their players do and how their players describe it.
 


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