D&D General D&D memes thread discussion…


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deadman1204

Explorer
how to guilt-trip your players
The dark side of dnd. Players are literally the most evil people on the planet. We go around and murder everything just to take its stuff. Murder century old dragons for the loot, and then enslave their children as pets and mounts. Its only evil if we do this to people we like, but since we don't like those races (yet we are not racist) its not only ok, its virtuous...
The most lawful good player is truely a dark terror on the world.
 

Oofta

Legend
The dark side of dnd. Players are literally the most evil people on the planet. We go around and murder everything just to take its stuff. Murder century old dragons for the loot, and then enslave their children as pets and mounts. Its only evil if we do this to people we like, but since we don't like those races (yet we are not racist) its not only ok, its virtuous...
The most lawful good player is truely a dark terror on the world.

At least some people don't play that way. Of course you can always massage just about any scenario into "it's evil", but I think the motivation of "storm the castle to get the fat lootz" is very old school. 🤷‍♂️
 

deadman1204

Explorer
At least some people don't play that way. Of course you can always massage just about any scenario into "it's evil", but I think the motivation of "storm the castle to get the fat lootz" is very old school. 🤷‍♂️
We like to dress it up and pretend to be social justice warriors, but at the end of the day, advancing your character is about getting the loots - aka new and better magic items and exp. You get experience and level via killing things.
The entire game system is desiged around combat, with skill stuff a throwaway second place where any problem can be solved with a single dice roll.
 

Oofta

Legend
We like to dress it up and pretend to be social justice warriors, but at the end of the day, advancing your character is about getting the loots - aka new and better magic items and exp. You get experience and level via killing things.
The entire game system is desiged around combat, with skill stuff a throwaway second place where any problem can be solved with a single dice roll.
The motivations and reasons matter. People are messy and complex, things are rarely black and white. But I haven't played in or run a murder hobo game for a very long time.
 

Vaalingrade

Legend
We like to dress it up and pretend to be social justice warriors, but at the end of the day, advancing your character is about getting the loots - aka new and better magic items and exp.
Welp, 'social justice warrior' has finally lost the last clinging scrap of meaning left to its all too long history of terrible use cases.

I didn't expect it to end in 'doesn't use XP', but here we are.
 

CreamCloud0

One day, I hope to actually play DnD.
The motivations and reasons matter. People are messy and complex, things are rarely black and white. But I haven't played in or run a murder hobo game for a very long time.
i don't think it even needs to go so far as to be murderhoboing that is happening, but can you really deny the vast majority of character progression for most people's games is typically based in a cycle of combat and loot?
 

i don't think it even needs to go so far as to be murderhoboing that is happening, but can you really deny the vast majority of character progression for most people's games is typically based in a cycle of combat and loot?
I think there's a pretty significant difference between "we go fight evil, and occasionally get paid / rewarded / training / notice our skills increasing" and "lets go kill some bandits so we can practice fighting and take their stuff."

Even if the mechanics aren't really any different, it's a wildly different narrative.
 

CreamCloud0

One day, I hope to actually play DnD.
I think there's a pretty significant difference between "we go fight evil, and occasionally get paid / rewarded / training / notice our skills increasing" and "lets go kill some bandits so we can practice fighting and take their stuff."

Even if the mechanics aren't really any different, it's a wildly different narrative.
my point was the opposite, that regardless of the narrative it takes the majority of progression in games is usually tied to some form of combat and loot, be that loot be aquired in a dungeon, bought in a store or given as reward.

i don't deny that some players still level via RP and social encounters but i suspect it is a far far smaller fraction in comparison.
 

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