Define Problem

In relation to an RPG - how do you define "problem"


  • Total voters
    40
So there's alot of threads where someone states that X is a problem. There's a lot of the same people that typically reply that X is not a problem. So I'm wondering if the nuances behind how each of us individually define problem is one of the biggest drivers of those differences in opinion.

I think the best place to start there is to get an idea of what everyone thinks a problem is in relation to an RPG.

So how do you define problem? (Pick all that apply)
 

TwoSix

Lover of things you hate
A lot of the definitions here are unclear; ask 10 posters here as to what "unbalanced" means in relation to an RPG (or even specifically 5e D&D) and you're going to get 11 different answers.

That's a problem. :)
 
So I'm wondering if the nuances behind how each of us individually define problem is one of the biggest drivers of those differences in opinion.
I suspect there's also nuances behind "not a problem."

For instance, if the problem is something I, as a powergamer, can ruthlessly exploit at chargen, it's Not A Problem! ;D

Or, if it's a problem with a prior edition, it was definitely a problem that the new edition fixed, while if it's a problem with the new edition, it's a problem with the complainant who just can't get over the old edition.
 
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aco175

Adventurer
It is kind of like Magic TG where there are cards that everyone wants in their deck and each edition that comes out has similar cards that are a bit more powerful to make people want them more.
 

Jacob Lewis

The One with the Force
It's a problem only if your table thinks it's a problem. It's not a crisis. You don't need to rally the other tables and make a stand about every little thing that peeves you. Stop worrying so much about what is going on every place else that you are not playing, then focus on what affects your games and resolve them with your group for your table.

The good news is you're free to decide whatever a problem is to you. Just stop trying to convince everyone else that it's a problem for them, too. Because if they aren't already thinking it, then it's probably not. And that becomes the problem.
 
It's a problem only if your table thinks it's a problem. It's not a crisis. You don't need to rally the other tables and make a stand about every little thing that peeves you. Stop worrying so much about what is going on every place else that you are not playing, then focus on what affects your games and resolve them with your group for your table.

The good news is you're free to decide whatever a problem is to you. Just stop trying to convince everyone else that it's a problem for them, too. Because if they aren't already thinking it, then it's probably not. And that becomes the problem.
Hmmmm… Can something be a problem in general without being a problem for you specifically?
 
A lot of the definitions here are unclear; ask 10 posters here as to what "unbalanced" means in relation to an RPG (or even specifically 5e D&D) and you're going to get 11 different answers.

That's a problem. :)
The point of this thread is the definition of problem. I fully believe everyone is capable of answer the question with respect to what balance or any other word means personally for them.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
I’m afraid I don’t understand the question. Are we talking about “problem” like “so-and-so is a problem player?”
 

ccs

39th lv DM
Pretty much unfun & unplayable. After that comes too complex (this usually leads directly to the first two)
Possibly too simple as well.
 

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