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Eberron: Rising from the Last War Coming For D&D In November

A new D&D camapign setting has appeared on Amazon -- Eberron: Rising from the Last War. It's slated for November 19th, at $49.99.

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Explore the lands of Eberron in this campaign sourcebook for the world’s greatest roleplaying game.

This book provides everything players and Dungeon Masters need to play Dungeons & Dragons in Eberron—a war-torn world filled with magic-fueled technology, airships and lightning trains, where noir-inspired mystery meets swashbuckling adventure. Will Eberron enter a prosperous new age or will the shadow of war descend once again?

• Dive straight into your pulp adventures with easy-to-use locations, complete with maps of floating castles, skyscrapers, and more.

• Explore Sharn, a city of skyscrapers, airships, and noirish intrigue and a crossroads for the world’s war-ravaged peoples.

• Include a campaign for characters venturing into the Mournland, a mist-cloaked, corpse-littered land twisted by magic.

• Meld magic and invention to craft objects of wonder as an artificer—the first official class to be released for fifth edition D&D since the Player’s Handbook.

• Flesh out your characters with a new D&D game element called a group patron—a background for your whole party.

• Explore 16 new race/subrace options including dragonmarks, which magically transform certain members of the races in the Player’s Handbook.

• Confront horrific monsters born from the world’s devastating wars.

There is an alternate cover for game stores:

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WotC's Jeremy Crawford confirmed that "The book incorporates the material in "Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron" and adds a whole lot more."
 
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Comments

Aldarc

Adventurer
I think the archeology theme is more FRs turf.
Archaeology is part of "FRs turf"? Hardly. FR dabbles in it. Eberron swims in it.

It's one of the things the Harper's do.
One of the things they do? Cute. It's what Sharn's Morgrave University specializes in.

The "Archaeologist" background is in (Forgotten Realms set) Tomb of Annihilation.
In a book that was published before either Wayfarer's Guide or the Eberron book? You don't say? I guess that background completely invalidates archaeology being a greater presence in Eberron and proves that it is part of "FRs turf."

It's right in the name, Forgotten Realms.
Seriously? That's the argument you are coming up with as evidence that archaeology is more prevalent in FR than Eberron?
 

gyor

Adventurer
Archaeology is part of "FRs turf"? Hardly. FR dabbles in it. Eberron swims in it.

One of the things they do? Cute. It's what Sharn's Morgrave University specializes in.

In a book that was published before either Wayfarer's Guide or the Eberron book? You don't say? I guess that background completely invalidates archaeology being a greater presence in Eberron and proves that it is part of "FRs turf."

Seriously? That's the argument you are coming up with as evidence that archaeology is more prevalent in FR than Eberron?
The Forgotten Realms has dozens, upon dozens of ancient civilizations and historical periods to explore, it also has universities and Librabraries like candle keep.

FR doesn't dabble in it, its the basic style of the setting, FR is filled with ruins from ancient civilizations.
 

Paul Farquhar

Adventurer
In a book that was published before either Wayfarer's Guide or the Eberron book? You don't say? I guess that background completely invalidates archaeology being a greater presence in Eberron and proves that it is part of "FRs turf."
No, it means that this is a baldy stupid argument, archaeology is a major feature in every D&D setting ever, and Indiana Jones has had a significant influence on D&D ever since 1981 (and D&D was itself an influence on Raiders of the Lost Ark).
 

Aldarc

Adventurer
The Forgotten Realms has dozens, upon dozens of ancient civilizations and historical periods to explore, it also has universities and Librabraries like candle keep.
"The Forgotten Realms has dozens, upon dozens of ancient civilizations and historical periods to explore" isn't an argument that Forgotten Realms has a pervasive archaeology scene. It's an argument that FR has history. These are obviously not equivalent thesis statements.

Likewise, having universities and libraries does not mean that Forgotten Realms has a pervasive archaeology theme. Candlekeep, for example, is not defined by archaeology. We are told of its extensive libraries and lore, but archaeology, treasure-hunting, and lost antiquities are not a forefront element. Contrast this with Morgrave University, where archaeology is a forefront element that defines the activities of the university. It's what they do. Morgrave University has a museum of antiquities that is even open to the public. Eberron has a fairly clear conscientious awareness of archaeology as we think about it and how it exists in the popular imagination of pop pulp adventure.

FR doesn't dabble in it, its the basic style of the setting, FR is filled with ruins from ancient civilizations.
Rather it seems that you are asserting that it is "the basic style of the setting" because you want FR to be the omni-setting for all things and for some reason can't accept the fact that other settings may do certain things better than FR. I'm not sure why you are so insecure or sensitive about this issue.

No, it means that this is a baldy stupid argument, archaeology is a major feature in every D&D setting ever, and Indiana Jones has had a significant influence on D&D ever since 1981 (and D&D was itself an influence on Raiders of the Lost Ark).
Except that's not even remotely true.
 

Aldarc

Adventurer
You are welcome to make an actual counter argument that "the presence of ancient ruins to investigate = archaeology" or even that "the presence of stars in a setting = a theme of astrophysics," but I suspect that you are just blowing smoke at this point.
 

Paul Farquhar

Adventurer
You are welcome to make an actual counter argument that "the presence of ancient ruins to investigate = archaeology" or even that "the presence of stars in a setting = a theme of astrophysics," but I suspect that you are just blowing smoke at this point.
Dictionary:
Archaeology, or archeology, is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture
But the truth is, the difference between archaeology and treasure hunting has always been pretty thin, the terminology was invented to try and make the profession seem more respectable.

If you want to make a distinction at all, then it really boils down to the objective of archaeology is knowledge, not the artefacts themselves (yeah, right, Lord Elgin!).

But it is a common D&D trope in any setting for an NPC to engage the party to bring back some piece of ancient knowledge, and that makes it archeology.
 

doctorbadwolf

Adventurer
It's right in the name, Forgotten Realms.
That doesn’t even make sense. You’re making a leap and expecting everyone to follow with no explanation.
It's one of the things the Harper's do.
Okay? In Eberron it’s a common adventuring type that gets articles in the papers written about you.

And far as I know, Harpers don’t run museums or universities that fund expeditions.
 

PsyzhranV2

Explorer
Dictionary:
But the truth is, the difference between archaeology and treasure hunting has always been pretty thin, the terminology was invented to try and make the profession seem more respectable.

If you want to make a distinction at all, then it really boils down to the objective of archaeology is knowledge, not the artefacts themselves (yeah, right, Lord Elgin!).

But it is a common D&D trope in any setting for an NPC to engage the party to bring back some piece of ancient knowledge, and that makes it archeology.
Which other settings have universities with faculties dedicated to archaeology? Because Eberron's Morgrave does. Plus, Indiana Jones was a tenured professor, not merely a grave robber.
 

Parmandur

Legend
While that’s true, archeology, as such, is an actual thing in Eberron. With wealthy patrons and notoriety for discovering lost stuff from bygone eras and uncovering secrets thought lost forever and the everything else you expect from an Indiana Jones style story.

I can’t recall any mention in any FR book of any of that. I’m sure it’s there, it just never made the most remote impression on me while reading FR books.

But in Eberron is explicitly a reasonably common source of adventuring money. Morgrave, the Twelve, etc, fund archeological expeditions.

That, actual 19th and 20th century style archeology as such, isn’t all that common in dnd worlds.
Respectable, socially sanctioned grave robbing is much more an Eberron thing, absolutely.
 

doctorbadwolf

Adventurer
Which other settings have universities with faculties dedicated to archaeology? Because Eberron's Morgrave does. Plus, Indiana Jones was a tenured professor, not merely a grave robber.
Exactly this. The harpers paying adventurers to keep items of power out of the hands of the Zhentarim isn’t the same thing. Going into tombs to steal the loot isn’t the same thing.

All dnd settings have treasure hunting. Eberron explicitly has archeology as such.
 

Parmandur

Legend
That doesn’t even make sense. You’re making a leap and expecting everyone to follow with no explanation.

Okay? In Eberron it’s a common adventuring type that gets articles in the papers written about you.

And far as I know, Harpers don’t run museums or universities that fund expeditions.
I think what @gyor is saying is that the FR has layers of ancient civilizations and empires that are "Forgotten" waiting to be discovered. And the Harper's do have an organized grave-robbing operation, to discover information and magical artifacts to move their political program ahead.
 

doctorbadwolf

Adventurer
Giving
Respectable, socially sanctioned grave robbing is much more an Eberron thing, absolutely.
If you think the only difference is social sanctioning, this discussion is useless. DnD “grave robbing” (gods I’m glad I never played in the sort of games that seem to have formed a lot of y’alls concept of what dnd is) isn’t generally about academic discovery. “It belongs in a museum!” Doesn’t fit every dnd setting as a perfectly reasonable thing to say.
It does fit Eberron. That whole scene does. Because Eberron has actual archeologists who work for academic institutions, whose funds end up in museums.
 

Aldarc

Adventurer
Dictionary:
But the truth is, the difference between archaeology and treasure hunting has always been pretty thin, the terminology was invented to try and make the profession seem more respectable.

If you want to make a distinction at all, then it really boils down to the objective of archaeology is knowledge, not the artefacts themselves (yeah, right, Lord Elgin!).

But it is a common D&D trope in any setting for an NPC to engage the party to bring back some piece of ancient knowledge, and that makes it archeology.
I am not sure if I am following the coherence of your argument here, @Paul Farquhar. First, you argued that archaeology was a major feature of every D&D setting, which I do not believe is true. Then your response to that was to equate "the presence of ancient ruins to investigate" with 'archaeology," which is also false. When I challenged the idea that these things equated, your response was a curt re-quote of something I had previously said. So I invited you to provide your own counterargument, which brings us to this above quote, which leaves me scratching my head because you first make an unsupported appeal to definition that fails to connect the definition with your thesis and then equivocate on that definition so that the activity of PCs in D&D constitutes "archaeology" by liberally stretching that definition. There are a number of problems with this argument, many of which involve the arguments shifting from one goal post to another.

If you want to argue that grave-robbing and plundering tombs is a major part of every D&D setting, I'm still not sure I would agree (e.g., Spelljammer, Planescape, Dark Sun, etc.), but that seems like a more defensible position than saying "archaeology is a major feature in every D&D setting ever" as a way to marginalize the greater prevalence of archaeology in Eberron in comparison with other D&D settings.

I think what @gyor is saying is that the FR has layers of ancient civilizations and empires that are "Forgotten" waiting to be discovered. And the Harper's do have an organized grave-robbing operation, to discover information and magical artifacts to move their political program ahead.
I believe he also said that archaeology was somehow more FRs' "turf" than Eberron's, and he has so far appealed to the use of "forgotten" in the setting name, the fact that it has history and libraries, and that grave-robbing is something that the Harpers occasionally do. Do you agree with him then that Forgotten Realms has more of an archaeological theme than Eberron? I do not doubt that Forgotten Realms has archaeology, but we are arguing about its prevalence in comparison with Eberron and the extent to which it can be considered a prevalent feature of FR as it is with Eberron.
 

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