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Eberron: Rising from the Last War Coming For D&D In November

A new D&D camapign setting has appeared on Amazon -- Eberron: Rising from the Last War. It's slated for November 19th, at $49.99.

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Explore the lands of Eberron in this campaign sourcebook for the world’s greatest roleplaying game.

This book provides everything players and Dungeon Masters need to play Dungeons & Dragons in Eberron—a war-torn world filled with magic-fueled technology, airships and lightning trains, where noir-inspired mystery meets swashbuckling adventure. Will Eberron enter a prosperous new age or will the shadow of war descend once again?

• Dive straight into your pulp adventures with easy-to-use locations, complete with maps of floating castles, skyscrapers, and more.

• Explore Sharn, a city of skyscrapers, airships, and noirish intrigue and a crossroads for the world’s war-ravaged peoples.

• Include a campaign for characters venturing into the Mournland, a mist-cloaked, corpse-littered land twisted by magic.

• Meld magic and invention to craft objects of wonder as an artificer—the first official class to be released for fifth edition D&D since the Player’s Handbook.

• Flesh out your characters with a new D&D game element called a group patron—a background for your whole party.

• Explore 16 new race/subrace options including dragonmarks, which magically transform certain members of the races in the Player’s Handbook.

• Confront horrific monsters born from the world’s devastating wars.

There is an alternate cover for game stores:

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WotC's Jeremy Crawford confirmed that "The book incorporates the material in "Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron" and adds a whole lot more."
 
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Comments

Parmandur

Legend
I am not sure if I am following the coherence of your argument here, @Paul Farquhar. First, you argued that archaeology was a major feature of every D&D setting, which I do not believe is true. Then your response to that was to equate "the presence of ancient ruins to investigate" with 'archaeology," which is also false. When I challenged the idea that these things equated, your response was a curt re-quote of something I had previously said. So I invited you to provide your own counterargument, which brings us to this above quote, which leaves me scratching my head because you first make an unsupported appeal to definition that fails to connect the definition with your thesis and then equivocate on that definition so that the activity of PCs in D&D constitutes "archaeology" by liberally stretching that definition. There are a number of problems with this argument, many of which involve the arguments shifting from one goal post to another.

If you want to argue that grave-robbing and plundering tombs is a major part of every D&D setting, I'm still not sure I would agree (e.g., Spelljammer, Planescape, Dark Sun, etc.), but that seems like a more defensible position than saying "archaeology is a major feature in every D&D setting ever" as a way to marginalize the greater prevalence of archaeology in Eberron in comparison with other D&D settings.

I believe he also said that archaeology was somehow more FRs' "turf" than Eberron's, and he has so far appealed to the use of "forgotten" in the setting name, the fact that it has history and libraries, and that grave-robbing is something that the Harpers occasionally do. Do you agree with him then that Forgotten Realms has more of an archaeological theme than Eberron? I do not doubt that Forgotten Realms has archaeology, but we are arguing about its prevalence in comparison with Eberron and the extent to which it can be considered a prevalent feature of FR as it is with Eberron.
Oh, heavens, no, I don't agree with that position. While grave robbery is pretty core to the entire concept of D&D, archeology as a social justification is not, with Eberron being rather exceptional in that regard.
 

Paul Farquhar

Adventurer
Which other settings have universities with faculties dedicated to archaeology? Because Eberron's Morgrave does. Plus, Indiana Jones was a tenured professor, not merely a grave robber.
I don't buy this idea that for graverobbing to be archaeology it must be backed by a university. Lord Carnarvon payed for his expedition with Howard Carter with his own money and had nothing to do with any university. Belzoni, the closest RL Indiana Jones, was not connected to any university. And I could list off dozens of others.

However, the Forgotten Realms (e.g. Waterdeep, Suzail) and Planescape (Sigil) have universities. Golarion (Pathfinder FR) has several.
 

doctorbadwolf

Adventurer
It's also true of literally every setting, from the Wilderlands of High Fantasy on.
What is?
I don't buy this idea that for graverobbing to be archaeology it must be backed by a university. Lord Carnarvon payed for his expedition with Howard Carter with his own money and had nothing to do with any university. Belzoni, the closest RL Indiana Jones, was not connected to any university. And I could list off dozens of others.

However, the Forgotten Realms (e.g. Waterdeep, Suzail) and Planescape (Sigil) have universities.
Having universities doesn’t make archeology a theme of the setting.

Digging up/entering old ruins for the purpose of academic discovery is archeology as such. Some people want to view it is indistinguishable from “grave robbing” other than social stigma, but I’m happy to just roll my eyes at that. The actual distinction is academic discovery.

This may exist in FR, but it isn’t a major theme of the setting. It is in Eberron.
 

lowkey13

I'm sorry, Dave. I'm afraid I can't do that.
Having universities doesn’t make archeology a theme of the setting.

Digging up/entering old ruins for the purpose of academic discovery is archeology as such. Some people want to view it is indistinguishable from “grave robbing” other than social stigma, but I’m happy to just roll my eyes at that. The actual distinction is academic discovery.

This may exist in FR, but it isn’t a major theme of the setting. It is in Eberron.
Oof. So ... there is a distinction between basic graverobbing (I loot graves and sell what I find for personal gain) and modern archaeology (I carefully record the presence of items at, um, gravesites and, under the color of law of the national authority for the area, return the items to the national authority and publish my results to further my academic career and/or to advance knowledge) ....

But the difference can often be muddled, especially when dealing with the past. And maybe that's not a great topic of discussion?

Esp. when we're are talking about made-up campaign settings? :)
 

Paul Farquhar

Adventurer
Having universities doesn’t make archeology a theme of the setting.
I believe I said that. I wasn't the one who claimed that archaeology required universities.

Digging up/entering old ruins for the purpose of academic discovery is archeology as such. Some people want to view it is indistinguishable from “grave robbing” other than social stigma, but I’m happy to just roll my eyes at that. The actual distinction is academic discovery.
Even if you insist on Archaeology only having the purest motives, I can attest from personal experience that there are plenty of eccentric gnome scholars in pretty much any D&D setting wanting pure research.

This may exist in FR, but it isn’t a major theme of the setting. It is in Eberron.
It's a theme that occurs in Eberron. It's not the major theme in Eberron - I thinking you are letting your experience of particular adventures colour your view of the setting.

And it's a theme in most other D&D (and D&D ajacent) settings.

The is an archaeological dig in the Baldur's Gate CRPG. A companion in Pillar's of Eternity is an archaeologist. Pathfinder has an archaeologist subclass for bard, as well as several university archaeology departments that feature in Golarion adventures.
 

doctorbadwolf

Adventurer
Oof. So ... there is a distinction between basic graverobbing (I loot graves and sell what I find for personal gain) and modern archaeology (I carefully record the presence of items at, um, gravesites and, under the color of law of the national authority for the area, return the items to the national authority and publish my results to further my academic career and/or to advance knowledge) ....

But the difference can often be muddled, especially when dealing with the past. And maybe that's not a great topic of discussion?

Esp. when we're are talking about made-up campaign settings? :)
They are wholly distinct fictional themes. Only cynical “hot take” critics and old Cracked videos refer to Indiana Jones as a grave-robber, because that is a separate archetype from the one he is an example of.

This is directly relevant to the discussion of whether archeology is a theme of a setting.
 

Aldarc

Adventurer
What I think is worth noting is that the academic distinction between treasure-hunting/grave-robbing and archaeology is also one that exists in Eberron, something that gets discussed in various sourcebooks. While these things can be muddled, especially when it comes to the process of recovering antiquities, the point is that archaeology exists as a named, prominent academic discipline within Eberron (e.g., Morgrave University) and therein it conscientiously grapples with those issues by archaeologists and academics in the setting.
 

Paul Farquhar

Adventurer
They are wholly distinct fictional themes. Only cynical “hot take” critics and old Cracked videos refer to Indiana Jones as a grave-robber, because that is a separate archetype from the one he is an example of.

This is directly relevant to the discussion of whether archeology is a theme of a setting.
Actually, characters in Indiana Jones movies refer to Indiana Jones as a grave robber. And it's an archetype he finds it difficult to separate himself from.
 

lowkey13

I'm sorry, Dave. I'm afraid I can't do that.
They are wholly distinct fictional themes. Only cynical “hot take” critics and old Cracked videos refer to Indiana Jones as a grave-robber, because that is a separate archetype from the one he is an example of.
Eh ... not really? I mean, I don't think I'm either being cynical or having a "hot take" to say that taking artifacts from one country/culture and appropriating them to another country/culture is not exactly ... considered purely awesome sauce anymore.

And yeah, Indy is kind of a grave robber.

This is directly relevant to the discussion of whether archeology is a theme of a setting.
Um ... well, I'd probably keep it to the setting, than try to analogize it to modern practices. Because if Eberron is close to the 30s (or before) and if the antiquities actually have some real power (magic) then I'm guessing the funders of the Eberron universities likely have a vested interest in seeing a few of those artifacts themselves.
 

doctorbadwolf

Adventurer
I believe I said that. I wasn't the one who claimed that archaeology required universities.



Even if you insist on Archaeology only having the purest motives, I can attest from personal experience that there are plenty of eccentric gnome scholars in pretty much any D&D setting wanting pure research.


It's a theme that occurs in Eberron. It's not the major theme in Eberron - I thinking you are letting your experience of particular adventures colour your view of the setting.

And it's a theme in most other D&D (and D&D ajacent) settings.

The is an archaeological dig in the Baldur's Gate CRPG. A companion in Pillar's of Eternity is an archaeologist. Pathfinder has an archaeologist subclass for bard, as well as several university archaeology departments that feature in Golarion adventures.
You may want to mentally review the difference between the term “a major theme” and “the major theme”, because they don’t mean the same thing.

Further, while there are the occasional archeologists in dnd games, it just isn’t a noticeable part of the world building. What FR campaign guide mentions archeologists of renown or institutions that support them? Who are the powerful who fund archeology in FR, and what game supplements are they discussed within? Are they in primary supplements or obscure deep dive books from the end of 2e’s setting book extravaganza?

The point is, something existing in a setting doesn’t make it a theme or important aspect of that setting.

Pulp archeological adventure is a theme of and inspiration for Eberron, to a much greater extent than any other published dnd world.
 
Actually, characters in Indiana Jones movies refer to Indiana Jones as a grave robber. And it's an archetype he finds it difficult to separate himself from.
All archaeologists are grave robbers, but not all grave robbers are archaeologists. Relatedly, all pulp hero archaeologists are adventurers, but not all adventurers are pulp hero archaeologists. Indiana Jones, Lara Croft and Nathan Drake would all be perfectly fitting Eberron characters.
 

Urriak Uruk

Explorer
However, the Forgotten Realms (e.g. Waterdeep, Suzail) and Planescape (Sigil) have universities. Golarion (Pathfinder FR) has several.
Overall this "who has more archaeology" debate is silly, but using frickin Pathfinder's world as evidence for Forgotten Realms has got to be the most ridiculous point yet. Their not the same worlds, much less the same game system!
 

doctorbadwolf

Adventurer
Eh ... not really? I mean, I don't think I'm either being cynical or having a "hot take" to say that taking artifacts from one country/culture and appropriating them to another country/culture is not exactly ... considered purely awesome sauce anymore.

And yeah, Indy is kind of a grave robber.



Um ... well, I'd probably keep it to the setting, than try to analogize it to modern practices. Because if Eberron is close to the 30s (or before) and if the antiquities actually have some real power (magic) then I'm guessing the funders of the Eberron universities likely have a vested interest in seeing a few of those artifacts themselves.
There are museums. Into which archeological finds go. Where the public can view and learn from them.

It really seems like y’all are being intentionally obtuse, here, or have lost track of where this discussion began.

Eberron has, as a theme, 19th/20th century style pulp inspired archeology as such, by that name, in a form directly recognizable to anyone familiar with media depicting real world 19th/20th century archeology.

Claiming that archeology is more FR’s turf is entirely absurd.
 

lowkey13

I'm sorry, Dave. I'm afraid I can't do that.
There are museums. Into which archeological finds go. Where the public can view and learn from them.

It really seems like y’all are being intentionally obtuse, here, or have lost track of where this discussion began.

Eberron has, as a theme, 19th/20th century style pulp inspired archeology as such, by that name, in a form directly recognizable to anyone familiar with media depicting real world 19th/20th century archeology.

Claiming that archeology is more FR’s turf is entirely absurd.
Here's the salient part of what I wrote-
"But the difference can often be muddled, especially when dealing with the past. And maybe that's not a great topic of discussion?

Esp. when we're are talking about made-up campaign settings? "


Again, looting tombs in another country and putting that stuff in your museum is kinda sorta controversial today.

Didn't say anything about FR. Don't really care about the moral valence in your campaign (Orcs are just bags of XP, etc.).

Just pointing out you might want to avoid statements about the nobility of 1920s archaeologists. And that's before getting to the amount of material that magically ended up in collectors' hands. :)
 

Aldarc

Adventurer
Again, looting tombs in another country and putting that stuff in your museum is kinda sorta controversial today.

Just pointing out you might want to avoid statements about the nobility of 1920s archaeologists. And that's before getting to the amount of material that magically ended up in collectors' hands. :)
But these are also issues that the setting of Eberron actively engages as part of the setting, and it is that in-setting controversy consciousness that largely sets it apart from its fellow settings.
 

lowkey13

I'm sorry, Dave. I'm afraid I can't do that.
But these are also issues that the setting of Eberron actively engages as part of the setting, and it is that in-setting controversy consciousness that largely sets it apart from its fellow settings.
How does Eberron handle the controversy in-setting?
 

Bitbrain

Explorer
How does Eberron handle the controversy in-setting?
Morgrave University basically gives the excuse that even though they are little more than treasure hunters, they are still bringing relics of the long-lost past back into public knowledge.

To be fair, they don’t have the best of reputations in academic circles.
 

Aldarc

Adventurer
How does Eberron handle the controversy in-setting?
It explicitly deals with the fact that there are "claims that [Morgrave University's] archaeological activities are infested with smugglers and treasure hunters" (ECS, p. 243) and that the founder of Morgrave University supposedly "made his fortune selling Dhakaani artifacts on the black market, and some claimed that the true purpose of the university was to assist him in his treasure hunting." The current head of the university, "Master Larrian has vowed to put an end to these acts of smuggling and profiteering,..."

This is just in the Eberron Campaign Setting segment on Morgrave University. So it shows that there is an in-setting awareness of the issues and controversies, and that NPCs are grappling with the issues.
 

doctorbadwolf

Adventurer
Here's the salient part of what I wrote-
"But the difference can often be muddled, especially when dealing with the past. And maybe that's not a great topic of discussion?

Esp. when we're are talking about made-up campaign settings? "


Again, looting tombs in another country and putting that stuff in your museum is kinda sorta controversial today.

Didn't say anything about FR. Don't really care about the moral valence in your campaign (Orcs are just bags of XP, etc.).

Just pointing out you might want to avoid statements about the nobility of 1920s archaeologists. And that's before getting to the amount of material that magically ended up in collectors' hands. :)
Oh, I don’t care about any perceived nobility of any dead figure from the past.
I am literally just pointing out the fact that there is a distinction, and that 19th/20th century style archeology is a major theme in one dnd world, not in any other published world. Putting stuff in museums for public edification is distinct from selling stuff to private collectors so they can show them off to their rich friends, regardless of any moral argument.
 

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