D&D 5E How long are you willing to wait for a build to "turn on?"

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
I don't mean to sound snarky, but I make characters, not builds. A build comes only as the character evolves and gains experience, and I rarely have even a subclass in mind when I start play (except when that comes at first level, of course).
Same here. By the time I start rolling stats, my character is more or less "built" already. I've got the backstory written, the background, race, and class already selected, and I've probably already started working on the character sketch and mini over at HeroForge. I know their personality, my DM and I have already talked about where they came from, where they live, and whether or not they have any NPC friends/enemies/family in the world. Filling out the character sheet is my last step.
 

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TwoSix

Uncomfortably diegetic
Same here. By the time I start rolling stats, my character is more or less "built" already. I've got the backstory written, the background, race, and class already selected, and I've probably already started working on the character sketch and mini over at HeroForge. I know their personality, my DM and I have already talked about where they came from, where they live, and whether or not they have any NPC friends/enemies/family in the world. Filling out the character sheet is my last step.
If I go to that level of detail first, I definitely don't want to roll stats! I don't even start thinking about concepts until stat generation method is decided (and rolled if it's random), as well as starting level and starting magic items (if any).
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
Supporter
but you have to admit that there are concepts that you can pitch and then not be able to play at level 1.

Sure. But being able to play anything you can pitch is not a reasonable expectation. I mean, even using the word "pitch" implies this: The game has a strike zone. If your pitch doesn't at least get in the general vicinity of the zone, that's not the zone's fault. The zone isn't hidden from you.

Every game has its limits and benefits. Part of the cooperative nature of the game is playing the game you are playing, and taking its limits into account.
 

Same here. By the time I start rolling stats, my character is more or less "built" already. I've got the backstory written, the background, race, and class already selected, and I've probably already started working on the character sketch and mini over at HeroForge. I know their personality, my DM and I have already talked about where they came from, where they live, and whether or not they have any NPC friends/enemies/family in the world. Filling out the character sheet is my last step.
do you ever have issues where the rolls don't allow for your concept?
 

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
If I go to that level of detail first, I definitely don't want to roll stats! I don't even start thinking about concepts until stat generation method is decided (and rolled if it's random), as well as starting level and starting magic items (if any).
It's not really a problem. I've already decided "my highest stat goes here, the next highest goes there," etc.

I'm never thinking "Okay, I need at least a 15 here, and this one can't be less than 13, because I need a 13 in order to get this, which I need to get that other thing," and so forth.

Just a different (and for my copper, a less stressful) way of doing it.
 



payn

He'll flip ya...Flip ya for real...
I'll reply within spirit of the discussion! I usually try and build characters that I can at least tolerate and play at any given level. If I have to take X amount of levels in something that's going to stall effectiveness now, for optimal performance later, I at least have to be able to enjoy the ride. So, Id say I have to have at least a base of my build idea online by 3rd level.

For those rare builds that have require lackluster leveling, I usually save those builds for games that start higher than level 1.
 

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
I'm glad that works for you, but for me, that feels more stressful, not less. If I only get one high stat, I'm going to want to play something different than if I have 3 or 4.
I didn't mean to imply that there's something wrong with a math-forward character concept. It's just hard for me to relate to.

What constitutes a "high stat" is going to vary from player to player, and from table to table. For me and mine, I consider anything above average to be "high," and that would basically be anything over 11. So by rolling 4d6 for my stats, I usually have at least 4 "high stats." (shrug)
 

I'll reply within spirit of the discussion! I usually try and build characters that I can at least tolerate and play at any given level.
Same here.

I have to admit though, I do pick different characters if I am absolutely certain a game will get to a certain level. If I'm not, I only pick ones I'll be happy with even if they're only ever low-level.

So for example, in games where I have no idea how far it's going to go, it'll be Bards, Paladins, Warlocks and the like. Classes which are fun at all levels, and fun even if they don't get anywhere. But if I expect to get to say, level 5 or more it opens up a bit, and I consider stuff like Druid, maybe Ranger, and some others.
 

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