OneDnD How much would you spend on monthly subscriptions for dnd?

How much would you spend on monthly subscriptions for dnd?

  • $0

    Votes: 91 61.1%
  • $10 or less

    Votes: 44 29.5%
  • $25 or less

    Votes: 13 8.7%
  • $50 or less

    Votes: 1 0.7%
  • More than $50

    Votes: 0 0.0%


log in or register to remove this ad


Clint_L

Hero
I have a master tier subscription on DDB and I consider it incredible value. It costs me 5-6 bucks a month, I think? Easily the best entertainment dollars I have ever spent. If there was a really good virtual tabletop that was easy to use (much easier than Roll20) I would pay for that, maybe a nominal subscription ($5-10/month) but I assume I'd also be making in-app purchases of terrain/creature modules.

I spend several hundred dollars/month on average for physical miniatures and terrain, so subscription fees are a drop in the bucket.

Edit: building on the "renting" vs. "owning" discussion folks were having, I am all for renting! Less wasteful and I don't wind up with crap cluttering up my house - I do enough of that with my miniatures.
 

I don't know what's included in the subscription.

I pay $100/year for a Roll20 Pro subscription, but then I also buy the Roll20 version of some books. List price is the same as the hardcopies. I've been averaging a couple products a year, so figure another $100 for content. According to my Roll20 stats, I've averaged over 500 hours a year there since 2014, though that includes time that I'm "in the game" prepping for the next session. But still, maybe 50 cents an hour spent on my favorite hobby for the past 42 years, so it feels like a pretty good value. Oh, I do buy the occasional item from DMs Guild, but not often and the cost is negligible.

I could imagine myself paying $500/year for D&D, but I'd need more value out of it than what I have now (basically VTT, character builder, and content).
 

I used to pay the $6 per month for D&D Insider, and that more than made the subscription worth it. I currently pay for the big DM tier currently for D&D Beyond and find it to be not at all onerous. I also throw Morrus a few sheckles every year for whatever tier it is I'm subscribed to EN World (Copper level or something?) as this place has given me hours of entertainment.

I personally find the comments about not wanting to "rent" material to be a bit overblown myself... seeing as how I've literally bought RPG material for good money, glanced through it for an hour, and then have NEVER gone back to it in however many years it has been and its just sat on my shelf. So those products might as well have been things I "subscribed to" then "lost" when the "servers got shut down" for all the results I got out of them. And the fact that I still technically "have them" is meaningless if I don't use them.

Owning something you don't use is not intrinsically better than renting something you do, as far as I'm concerned.

True, though if you buy something physical like a book you could always sell it later
 

If you and your players have good internet bandwidth, you might consider Foundry. One time $50 cost. You get best-on-market dynamic lighting, much more easily prepped maps, access to a dizzying number of community mods. If hosting on your own computer, your only storage limits are those of your machine.

I do use a hosting service to host my instance of Foundry, but that mostly because I'm usually running games from an location with not-great bandwidth and my players are in another country. There are other benefits to the hosting service I use, but if I were back working in, and running games from, the United States, I would likely just self-host on my computer. All of my content is fully portable. No lock in.
I've been a player in a Foundry game, and I found it to be a really good system. However, not only would I be unable to host it on my 10 year old laptop, I'm not computer savvy enough to know how. I think of all the paid options, it's almost certainly the best choice, but as I said... as long as I can successfully use Roll20 for free, it's unlikely I'll make the switch. If I have to switch, Foundry will almost certainly be my new system.
 

payn

Legend
I've been a player in a Foundry game, and I found it to be a really good system. However, not only would I be unable to host it on my 10 year old laptop, I'm not computer savvy enough to know how. I think of all the paid options, it's almost certainly the best choice, but as I said... as long as I can successfully use Roll20 for free, it's unlikely I'll make the switch. If I have to switch, Foundry will almost certainly be my new system.
The Forge allows you to host online your foundry games. I beleive its like 40 bucks a year for the entry tier which gets you a few game worlds. I have put a ton of art and journals into my Traveller game.

WotC sub system would have to offer at least that much. I know some folks are freaking out because they dont think you will be able to play 5E anywhere but on WotC system, but Foundry has proven to be pretty easy to use. Affordable to boot. So there is definitely levels of survival I am ready to accept.
 

Literally nothing. Print books and purchased PDFs only. Too many free resources to bother buying services.
These are generally my feelings too. Depending on what's offered on D&D Beyond and WotC VTT come the 2024 1D&D release I may be inclined to throw down some money for a month trial to give it a shot depending on the cost.

Edit: I think $25 is a realistic price for both, but again all depends on what is included.
 





MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
Owning something you don't use is not intrinsically better than renting something you do, as far as I'm concerned.
All depends on one's expected use case. When I see arguments about subscription services, versus purchased digital content, versus buying the physical material, I tend to see a lot folks talking past each other and not understanding where different people are coming from. When I really love a book, I will want a physical copy, even if that means I have to buy it twice in two different formats. I'm very glad I bought Volo's Guide in paper. It my favorite 5e book published by WotC. I'm also glad I bought it on DnD Beyond, because even though nobody can buy it now on DDB, I still have access to it and can share it.

My one concern with "renting" is that if they decide to make a book legacy and no longer support it, I suspect it may no longer be available. I prefer the current model where I can buy the digital books on DDB and still have access to them whether I pay for a subscription or not. My DDB subscription is more like a friends-and-family plan where I can share all my books with players in my campaigns, my son, and my son's friends. But I am also fully cognizant that WotC can change or remove my purchased content at any time. I still buy it because I the having errata automatically updated is mostly a good thing and I am pretty confident that I (and a number of people I share my content with) will get at least several years of use out of it.

But for the books I really like, I buy physical copies.
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
I mostly play online these days but just do so over Skype or discord with no miniatures or grid. If you take out the battle mat, online play feels a lot more like live table play
I guess it depends on what your live table play is like. When I ran games in person, I was printing out battlemaps with a plotter printer and also had a lot of terrain and 2d and 3d minies. I have a paper cutting machine and made lots of paper terrain and paper standee minis. My D&D group is decidedly more on the tactical wargame side of the spectrum, more than TOTM. Actually, I first started using VTT or VTT like setups for my live game to save time and money. I bought an LCD TV and put it in a case to lay horizontally and display maps with fog of war, first in RealmWorks and then with Map Tool.

When a new job made it so I had to run my games remotely, at first I tried to run it via Google Meet. It just didn't feel like live table play to me. Once I started using VTT it felt a lot more like our games when we played in person.

But if I were to run other systems, I would probably use Role or some other gaming-focused video conferencing system with character sheets, dice rolling, and very light map and image sharing.
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
There’s still a pandemic. I play 100% online. There are too many free tools online to ever bother paying for things you can get for free, do yourself, or don’t need.
What free tools do you use? If you don't want a full-featured VTT, sure, very easy to run TOTM games for free.

But once you get into VTT territory, many people would find it too much of a hassle to configure the technology to host the games themselves. I'm a huge fan of Map Tool, but I would never recommend someone run remote games using it unless I know they have a technical bent.

Roll20's free trier is a better alternative, but many game masters will hit the limitations of the free tier very quickly.
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
I think if I was playing in person I would switch to D&DBeyond for my character sheet.
At much as I like DDB, I never liked using it as a character sheet when playing in person. I find having everything in front of me on paper is still more convenient than tapping around on a phone, tablet, or laptop. I also find electronics take me out of the game.

One thing DDB sorely lacks is good printable versions of the character sheets. The PDFs it generates are crap. When I was playing in person in the early days of 5e, I used Hero Lab. I would print my character sheets from Hero Lab which were very well laid out to easily reference even very complicated characters, had tick boxes for expendables like spell slots and ammo and many other nice touches.
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
I have a master tier subscription on DDB and I consider it incredible value. It costs me 5-6 bucks a month, I think? Easily the best entertainment dollars I have ever spent. If there was a really good virtual tabletop that was easy to use (much easier than Roll20) I would pay for that, maybe a nominal subscription ($5-10/month) but I assume I'd also be making in-app purchases of terrain/creature modules.

I spend several hundred dollars/month on average for physical miniatures and terrain, so subscription fees are a drop in the bucket.

Edit: building on the "renting" vs. "owning" discussion folks were having, I am all for renting! Less wasteful and I don't wind up with crap cluttering up my house - I do enough of that with my miniatures.
Curious as to what you think of services that now rent terrain and minis. I've found them to be more expensive than I'm willing to pay. Even in-person, much cheaper and easier to just use digital battlemaps. But given how much you spend on terrain per month, perhaps you would save money renting--though I suspect that the painting and collecting are part of the appeal to you.
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
I could imagine myself paying $500/year for D&D, but I'd need more value out of it than what I have now (basically VTT, character builder, and content).
For $500 a year, it would have to be character building, rules and adventure content, full featured VTT with fully prepped maps and notes for the adventures, AND:
  • a decent encounter builder
  • good tools for making it easy to create custom actors and items that will work properly in the VTT
  • AND a fairly robust world-building / campaign management functionality.
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
True, though if you buy something physical like a book you could always sell it later
Well, in my experience, more like donate or give away. Even with board games, I've never found the money made worth the effort to sell them. TTRPG books are even worse. I feel much better, and it is much easier, to give to people who you know will enjoy them. Also my LFGS has a community game library. I've donated a lot of stuff to it over the years and it is nice to know that quite a bit of it will continue to be enjoyed by many other people. Donating to Goodwill or another charity may give me a tax write off, but never enough to make the extra effort and bookkeeping worth it. Besides, I think supporting the ability of the local community to enjoy games for free is a net good, even if that is a service provided by a pro-profit company.
 

overgeeked

B/X Known World
What free tools do you use? If you don't want a full-featured VTT, sure, very easy to run TOTM games for free.

But once you get into VTT territory, many people would find it too much of a hassle to configure the technology to host the games themselves. I'm a huge fan of Map Tool, but I would never recommend someone run remote games using it unless I know they have a technical bent.

Roll20's free trier is a better alternative, but many game masters will hit the limitations of the free tier very quickly.
I use the free tier of Roll20 but I’m not a pack rat with files. I don’t need to keep dozens of maps and tokens on their drives. A generic wilderness background, a generic town background, and a generic dungeon background are good enough. Any important details you can hand draw. Draw a few circles and tag them as enemies. It’s only when you get silly like thinking you need exactly the perfect map for every room, every hall, every town, and tokens for every NPC and monster that you run into trouble. Spending hours setting up dynamic lighting or worrying about whether the VTT has doors that open? Come on. You can run with butcher paper, markers, and tokens. No reason to get any more involved online simply because fancy tools exist. Save the time, save the money, and save the headache. The players can exercise a little imagination.
 

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top