OneDnD How much would you spend on monthly subscriptions for dnd?

How much would you spend on monthly subscriptions for dnd?

  • $0

    Votes: 92 61.3%
  • $10 or less

    Votes: 44 29.3%
  • $25 or less

    Votes: 13 8.7%
  • $50 or less

    Votes: 1 0.7%
  • More than $50

    Votes: 0 0.0%

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
The Forge allows you to host online your foundry games. I beleive its like 40 bucks a year for the entry tier which gets you a few game worlds. I have put a ton of art and journals into my Traveller game.

WotC sub system would have to offer at least that much. I know some folks are freaking out because they dont think you will be able to play 5E anywhere but on WotC system, but Foundry has proven to be pretty easy to use. Affordable to boot. So there is definitely levels of survival I am ready to accept.
Yeah, WotC may be able to make it more difficult to import their content from DDB into non-WotC VTTs, but there's nothing they can really do to stop people from using their VTT of choice. I tend to run third-party published adventures anyway, so am already doing most of my own VTT prep. If they made it impossible for me to import my paid-for content into Foundry, that would just make DDB that much less valuable to me. WotC should focus on making their VTT the best experience for running D&D online rather than trying to make it more difficult for everyone using other VTTs. If they took the later approach that would certainly get me looking seriously into switching to Pathfinder 2e.
 

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Clint_L

Hero
So if the results so far and my own vote are any indicator, if they do not want to lose more than half their players, they better not do this.
They've already done it, and DnDBeyond is incredibly popular. So are various non-WotC subscriptions, such as Roll20. So, yeah. They didn't lose more than half their players. I suspect that votes on a forum like this bear very, very little relationship to the vast population of D&D players.
 

UngainlyTitan

Legend
Supporter
At much as I like DDB, I never liked using it as a character sheet when playing in person. I find having everything in front of me on paper is still more convenient than tapping around on a phone, tablet, or laptop. I also find electronics take me out of the game.

One thing DDB sorely lacks is good printable versions of the character sheets. The PDFs it generates are crap. When I was playing in person in the early days of 5e, I used Hero Lab. I would print my character sheets from Hero Lab which were very well laid out to easily reference even very complicated characters, had tick boxes for expendables like spell slots and ammo and many other nice touches.
Each to their own but I have an uncanny ability to loose paper.
 

I guess it depends on what your live table play is like. When I ran games in person, I was printing out battlemaps with a plotter printer and also had a lot of terrain and 2d and 3d minies. I have a paper cutting machine and made lots of paper terrain and paper standee minis. My D&D group is decidedly more on the tactical wargame side of the spectrum, more than TOTM. Actually, I first started using VTT or VTT like setups for my live game to save time and money. I bought an LCD TV and put it in a case to lay horizontally and display maps with fog of war, first in RealmWorks and then with Map Tool.

When a new job made it so I had to run my games remotely, at first I tried to run it via Google Meet. It just didn't feel like live table play to me. Once I started using VTT it felt a lot more like our games when we played in person.

My live table play is mostly theater of the mind (with occasional miniature use for things like very large battles), so that does affect the outcome here for me. That said, when I have used VTT or other online platforms that make use of battlemats, I find the process to be a lot slower than at a regular table. That might just be me or the people I game with. Either way, I discovered pretty quickly I didn't enjoy gaming with VTT and that if I shifted to all theater of the mind for online play, it was basically 95% like a real session for me.
 

DEFCON 1

Legend
Supporter
They've already done it, and DnDBeyond is incredibly popular. So are various non-WotC subscriptions, such as Roll20. So, yeah. They didn't lose more than half their players. I suspect that votes on a forum like this bear very, very little relationship to the vast population of D&D players.
And of course the other point about all of this... it is very easy for all of us to make our declarations here and now when there's no actual demand or requirement for us acting out our choices. But if/when the situation postulated ever actually came to be... who knows whether we'd actually stick with the answer we gave? Thus it's kind of pointless for any of us to even bother "making a choice" right now. We can all say one thing in this thread, but can easily change our answers once we find ourselves actually in the situation for real.
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
Each to their own but I have an uncanny ability to loose paper.
Which is why I like the best of both worlds. Make the character online and print it before the game. I have an uncanny ability to forget to charge my phone.

Then again, I still print out copies of my boarding passes when possible. Just in case. :)
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
And of course the other point about all of this... it is very easy for all of us to make our declarations here and now when there's no actual demand or requirement for us acting out our choices. But if/when the situation postulated ever actually came to be... who knows whether we'd actually stick with the answer we gave? Thus it's kind of pointless for any of us to even bother "making a choice" right now. We can all say one thing in this thread, but can easily change our answers once we find ourselves actually in the situation for real.
And then we can enjoy defending out actual decisions on the interwebs as much as we enjoyed arguing about what we would or should do before we had to make a decision. :)
 

Mistwell

Crusty Old Meatwad (he/him)
How much would you spend per month on subscriptions related to dnd? This could be from dndbeyond, your VTT of choice, or even patreon subscriptions for things you use in your games.
I don't subscribe to the tier on DNDBeyond that gives you unlimited characters but I've been thinking about it. Our DM subscribes to the sharing option on DNDBeyond and that has been a lifesaver as he has the "all books" library which means all his players can access all the books. Extremely valuable to our groups.
 

UngainlyTitan

Legend
Supporter
Which is why I like the best of both worlds. Make the character online and print it before the game. I have an uncanny ability to forget to charge my phone.

Then again, I still print out copies of my boarding passes when possible. Just in case. :)
It I bring my tablet then I will bring the charger.
 

$0 monthly and this is a hill I will die on. I am one of those "whales" that Wizards is wanting to exploit. Tabletop games are one of my biggest hobbies and I spend at least a couple thousand dollars each year on rpg products between offical stuff, miniatures, dice, 3rd party products, and other stuff, and my wife is a avid Magic the Gathering fan. Neither of us is fond of the idea of Wizards turning DnD into a "live service digital" experience.

I am openly opposed to using DnD Beyond already, have no desire to use a virtual tabletop that I have to pay for, and will refuse to give wizards a single cent of money EVER again if they dare try to force a) force everyone to use a subscription service to play their game, b) implement any sort of microtransactions in order to play their products, or c) take any steps that outright destroy the ability for creators to release 3rd party products without using their oppressive DMsguild.

I already refuse to purchase apple products for similar reasons with their app store for taking absurd cuts from creators, and refuse to play any video game labeled a "live service" or purchase any sort of lootboxes, so why would I not be consistant with DnD?

No matter what happens I'll still be willing to play the new ruleset if I feel it's superior as a gaming experience. I'm just not allowed mention how as it's against forum rules. I just fear a handful of out of touch Wizards executives need a reminder of what happened with they tried this stuff last time. Pathfinder is still around after all.
 

Clint_L

Hero
I'm not sure how the Paizo situation relates? That was caused by WotC releasing a version of D&D that swerved sharply from the traditional game while simultaneously making it possible for Paizo to create a game that was more like traditional D&D than 4e was.

Here's what interests me: you seem willing to spend a ton on this hobby. That's cool; shout-out to a fellow miniatures and terrain enthusiast! Why does it bother you if Hasbro is trying to find ways to increase their share of that pie? You seem to feel that their actions would be exploitative, yet they aren't who you are currently giving most of your money to. How are they treating you like a "whale"? For that matter, in the discussion that spawned this and other threads, they already addressed the fact that they are too reliant on the most hardcore fans (DMs) and are primarily concerned with diversifying beyond their current base.

I'm also not sure why you seem annoyed by DnDBeyond. It is, and has always been, free to use. Most folks with accounts on it pay $0. I have a Master's Tier subscription, which costs me $7/month, and in addition to all the tools that save me hours of prep time every week, that allows me to share all of my resources with every player in all of my campaigns. I think that is an incredible bargain! And the micro-transactions are great - if a new book comes out and all you want from it is a new playable race, you can buy just that for a few bucks instead of having to pay for the whole book.

There is also no indication that Hasbro intends to make virtual play mandatory. How would they even do that? Offering a VTT is them arriving rather late at the party - millions of players already choose to use a VTT such as Roll20. As for 3rd party creators, WotC has been incredibly generous with allowing 3rd party creators to make products for its IP. Since you are a miniatures person like myself, consider Reaper. Half of their monsters are thinly disguised versions of WotC IP ("Floating Eye Beast," etc.) and WotC haven't said "boo" about it.

When I think of RPG vendors that treat me like a "whale," the first one that comes to mind is Wizkids, releasing highly coveted miniatures like the Tarrasque for upwards of $400! I can't think of one time that Hasbro/WotC has treated me like a "whale."

Here's my experience with WotC and DnDBeyond: they run a programme where, if you are using the game for educational purposes, they will gift you an entire set of every sourcebook and adventure and allow you to share them with your students. I applied for it because I run the D&D Club at my school. It was easy to do, they checked out my bona fides quickly with no fuss, no muss, and with a few days we received access to every single text on DnDBeyond. Well over $1000 worth of stuff (and they also kicked in a bunch of Magic bundles)!

From my perspective, these are not corporate villains.
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
$0 monthly and this is a hill I will die on. I am one of those "whales" that Wizards is wanting to exploit. Tabletop games are one of my biggest hobbies and I spend at least a couple thousand dollars each year on rpg products between offical stuff, miniatures, dice, 3rd party products, and other stuff, and my wife is a avid Magic the Gathering fan. Neither of us is fond of the idea of Wizards turning DnD into a "live service digital" experience.

I am openly opposed to using DnD Beyond already, have no desire to use a virtual tabletop that I have to pay for, and will refuse to give wizards a single cent of money EVER again if they dare try to force a) force everyone to use a subscription service to play their game, b) implement any sort of microtransactions in order to play their products, or c) take any steps that outright destroy the ability for creators to release 3rd party products without using their oppressive DMsguild.

I already refuse to purchase apple products for similar reasons with their app store for taking absurd cuts from creators, and refuse to play any video game labeled a "live service" or purchase any sort of lootboxes, so why would I not be consistant with DnD?

No matter what happens I'll still be willing to play the new ruleset if I feel it's superior as a gaming experience. I'm just not allowed mention how as it's against forum rules. I just fear a handful of out of touch Wizards executives need a reminder of what happened with they tried this stuff last time. Pathfinder is still around after all.
I'm sure that Wizard's will continue to happily sell you physical books and take their license fees from Whiz Kids, Beadle & Grimm, and other making D&D branded physical assets. You'll never HAVE to pay a subscription just to play D&D.
 

We use Dndbeyond and pay nothing. I use it to update the kids character sheets and print them so it's a hybrid of pen and paper and Dndbeyond. I've purchased books too. I also bought a single adventure from Yawning Portal. Using Dndbeyond while running a game is so much easier since all the monsters are hyperlinked and even pull of a preview with the necessary stats for a quick look.
 

pogre

Legend
I am not sure what to choose.

I do run a game online for far flung friends, but we do not play D&D. We play lots of other games and a few that are D&D-like, for example we're playing DCC right now.

I could envision an online service getting a subscription from me. If it were say a patreon which featured STLs for monsters and a few unusual PC races.

Years ago I subscribed to a service that released an adventure every couple of weeks which allowed you to input your party numbers and level and it would automatically adjust the adventure. Sadly, it did not make it. I cannot for the life of me remember what it was called. It was during the 3.X era. One of their main adventure writers was a prolific poster on ENWorld.

A Dungeon magazine type of subscription would bring me in.

Right now it is zero for subscription services. I use Owlbear Rodeo for most of our online stuff.

For the right materials I would throw down $50 a month or more.
 

aco175

Legend
I'm older like most of us here and do not like subscriptions. My new laptop kept wanting me to get Microsoft365 and ended up buying Office2018 so I would not have a subscription. I would not but a DDB subscription unless it had a Dungeon/Dragon type magazine with it. I look at that like a few of the other magazines I get each month.

My son though has some online things already and seems like his generation is fine with them. Seems like government programs starting in schools so the kids become used to them and do not complain and grow up with it.
 

HaroldTheHobbit

Adventurer
I have no problem with subscriptions, but I hate micro transactions. I did happily sub to Beyond, just like I now sub to The Forge to house Foundry.

Since me and my table have quit 5e and won't play D&D in the foreseeable future, I'm not gonna spend a cent on it. There are lots of other games out there that doesn't throw monetization and micro transactions in the face of their consumers and that manage to combine sales figures with actually good and fun gaming products.
 

Remathilis

Legend
Right now, I play Elder Scrolls Online with their Plus subscription. ESO+'s biggest selling point is access to all the smaller dlc zones and dungeons plus every annual chapter but the latest one. (So right now, plus gives you all chapters but the 2022 one and all dlc.) In addition, I get special subscription perks (dyeing costumes, slight boost to xp, and an unlimited craft bag) as well a stipend of premium currency that you can use in the cash shop for cosmetics and QoL updates. I pay $15 per month (less due to bulk discount) for this.

I would love to do the same for D&D Beyond. A single cost subscription to give me access to all (or maybe all but the most recent one) books in the Database, plus the master-tier subscription perks (unlimited PCs, share sources) for about $15 per month. The biggest hurdle to DnDB is that the book cost is expensive to start with. $90 for the core books, another $90 for the rule expansions (Xanathar, Tasha, Mordenkainen), plus a $5/month subscription to make more than a handful of PCs or share books. Toss in that VTT and I'll go as high as $20. (Twenty is what I pay for YouTube Music streaming access with all the YouTube plus features like no ads).

But buying each source separately, especially playing catch up, is financially out of my reach. WotC needs to allow a subscription to content or lower the buy-in cost for me to seriously consider using it.
 

I have no problem with subscriptions, but I hate micro transactions. I did happily sub to Beyond, just like I now sub to The Forge to house Foundry.

Since me and my table have quit 5e and won't play D&D in the foreseeable future, I'm not gonna spend a cent on it. There are lots of other games out there that doesn't throw monetization and micro transactions in the face of their consumers and that manage to combine sales figures with actually good and fun gaming products.
When did that happen with D&D?
 

Clint_L

Hero
When did that happen with D&D?
That's what I keep wondering. Folks seem very annoyed with Hasbro/WotC, but I can't for the life of me identify anything they've done that seems egregious. Their books have always been well priced. DnDBeyond is incredibly cheap, and the micro-transactions on it actually save you money by letting you choose to buy part of a book instead of the whole thing (plus, if you change you mind later and do want the rest of it, they discount what you already paid).

All the expensive stuff in the hobby is sold by third parties like Wizkids, Dwarven Forge, Beadle&Grimm, etc.

I don't understand what is driving the anger towards WotC. They've always been straight shooters, in my experience. They've got a good reputation with their staff, ex-staff, and business partners. They've done much better by their creatives than TSR ever did, that's for sure!

Maybe that will change, but it doesn't seem fair to judge them for stuff that might or might not happen. Given their history, I am inclined to give them the benefit of the doubt.
 

nevin

Hero
Not anymore than my Hulu or Netflix subscription. They get used every day. DND beyond gets used only when I can get my gaming group together. So 2 to 4 times a month. maybe 10 or so if you count looking up things for campaigns.
 

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