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5E How should be the future Oriental Adventures.

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
That's kind of the point of anastrophe. It makes you parse the sentence more slowly to give you more time to dwell on the idea being presented.

Anastrophe can be used for rhetorical effect; just like chiasmus.

But if someone is doing it every single time, there is no effect because there is no emphasis or delineation. So it's better to ignore.
 

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BookBarbarian

Expert Long Rester
Anastrophe can be used for rhetorical effect; just like chiasmus.

But if someone is doing it every single time, there is no effect because there is no emphasis or delineation. So it's better to ignore.
I agree. Any rhetorical device when overused loses effect. It's always best to keep mix it up.

(If my high school English teacher could see me talking about this now he would be so proud or maybe mildly amused)
 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
I agree. Any rhetorical device when overused loses effect. It's always best to keep mix it up.

(If my high school English teacher could see me talking about this now he would be so proud or maybe mildly amused)

Strangely, the one "weird" one almost everyone remembers is onomatopoeia, but every time I think of that, I immediately think of Batman (BAM!).

I always loved chiasmus as the best-est form of parallelism, but there is a fine line between a bad chiasmus and a good antimetabole.
 

BookBarbarian

Expert Long Rester
Strangely, the one "weird" one almost everyone remembers is onomatopoeia, but every time I think of that, I immediately think of Batman (BAM!).
For me it's whizzing. I don't know what that says about my mind though.
I always loved chiasmus as the best-est form of parallelism, but there is a fine line between a bad chiasmus and a good antimetabole.
Chiasmus is one I remember more from religious classes than English classes. And I agree. Simplify it too much and you've got a yokelism.

I'm realizing now how many I use day to day but forgot the terms for like antiphrasis.
 

TaranTheWanderer

Adventurer
(If my high school English teacher could see me talking about this now he would be so proud or maybe mildly amused)
I'm actually curious how many high school English teachers - or Professors are actually taking part in this conversation. FWIW, I have an English degree, so the concept of taking books out of circulation because of content feels wrong to me.
 

ART!

Adventurer
Just a quick question (sorry, I didn't read the whole thread yet) but how come "non-Western" cultures need to be portrayed accurately and respectfully, while "vanilla" western fantasy happily mixes (Celtic) druids, late-medieval Knights (Paladins), Renaissance-era tech, pseudo-Vikings, Barbarians, and generally is all over the place in terms of geography and time-period when it comes to Europe, with not the slightest pretense of accuracy?
I'm not begging the question "Shouldn't Europeans also be offended?" I'd just like to point out that if "vanilla" fantasy is already a pastiche, nobody should bat an eyelash at "exotic" fantasy also being a pastiche.
Answered before this was.
Writing of the other things have been from Caucasians. Written by Caucasians.
Other matters have been traditionally written by Caucasians. Writing for other cultures. This is not balanced.
Involvement of cultural consultants would be a start.

This exactly. "A dominant culture producing cultural content that reinforces their own dominant culture" is very different from "a dominant culture producing cultural content about marginalized cultures", which is very different from "a marginalized culture producing cultural content about their own marginalized culture"

Wasn't one reason for the CCA to head off the implied threat of government mandated censorship? Bringing your congressmen in to legally enforce censorship seems a lot different than lining up a boycott of a product. (I'm not saying the Satanic Panic was a good thing!!! but it feels a lot different than the government threatening to make the game take material out).

IIRC, the CCA came about because other publishers didn't like how successful EC Comics had become by the early '50s. EC produced a lot of horror comics, so the other publishers lobbied to have that kind of content censored. By 1956, EC had stopped publishing everything but Mad Magazine.
 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
For me it's whizzing. I don't know what that says about my mind though.

Chiasmus is one I remember more from religious classes than English classes. And I agree. Simplify it too much and you've got a yokelism.

I'm realizing now how many I use day to day but forgot the terms for like antiphrasis.

I'm not surprised that you hit chiasmus in a religious class; it's very Old Testament (ahem).

Like I was saying, figures of speech are fun.

Of all of the figures of speech and/or other literary devices, it's hard to pick a favorite.

Visually, there are some that work better than others ....

Even though others (like chiasmus) work better in terms of meaning.

When I think of the more basic ones, like alliteration, I tend to not care as much.

On the other hand, fatal foes fighting find fun frequently in figures of speech.

Regarding the best literary device, when I really think about it ....

Depending on the type of mood I am in .....

Seems that a good acrostic should fit the bill.
 

Cadence

Legend
Supporter
IIRC, the CCA came about because other publishers didn't like how successful EC Comics had become by the early '50s. EC produced a lot of horror comics, so the other publishers lobbied to have that kind of content censored. By 1956, EC had stopped publishing everything but Mad Magazine.

I don't remember reading anything where the other publishers were happy about the CCA. They might certainly have been happy to throw the horror companies under the bus to stay in business - but I think Wertham (and the surge he helped build and/or capitalized on) had a wider aim.


I need to read more to see how much Kefauver actually wanted.

 

If we stop to think a little we should notice Chineses had to be angry becasue the famous manga "Dragon Ball" is a mash-up what destroy totally the classic tale "Journey to the West" and Son Goku is a ersatz of the monkey king Sun Wukong.

I miss the "oriental" classes: samurai, ninja, sohei. These archetypes shouldn't be only subclasses.

A future Kara-Tur should be ready to can add psionic powers, martial adepts and maybe a remake of incarnum game mechanic.

The steps I advice are first as an advance to publish in DM Guild some tiles about "heroes from the far lands", the PC races (korobokuru, shen/spirit-folk, vanara, hengeyokai..)to know the feedback. After these races to be added to the SRD and wait to be used by the fandom and 3PPs for their own stories. About to add new classes I don't know what to opine because I ignore WotC's plans about possible new classes (with or without special game mechanics).

And we clear up despite all our efforst to be nice D&D has got its own mark of identity. One of them is different people working together for a common goal. This isn't common in the best of manga franchises, even in the subgenre sentai. D&D, even the "wuxia" version is very "cosmpolotiona. And it neither a musou (one against complete squads) neither a 1 vs 1 fights. D&D is more team vs team or squad vs (boss + minions). D&D is more "choral" or hiperlink plot.

I was Hasbro I would talk with companies from different countries (China, Korea, Taiwan, Japan) about to produce new franchises could be enough popular within and out of the different Asian markets. Of course it should be ideologycally neuter.

Before the return of Kara-Tur we will see a "wuxia" new world for Magic: the Gathering. Kamigawa isn't enough to be a "sandbox".


 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
I don't remember reading anything where the other publishers were happy about the CCA. They might certainly have been happy to throw the horror companies under the bus to stay in business - but I think Wertham (and the surge he helped build and/or capitalized on) had a wider aim.

So an interesting issue with private censorship, such as this, is that of transparency- to creators and to the public (I am speaking of America).

Let's assume that the Comics Industry would have been regulated. I think that's not a given, but assume that. Here's the thing- any regulation would have been transparent and open, subject to published procedures that were known to all (since, you know, the government). In addition, those procedures could have been challenged in court, and would have been ... and eventually would fall as prior restraints.

The perniciousness of this type of private censorship is that we have many of the drawbacks of government censorship (not all, private companies can't throw you in jail ... yet) without any real procedural means of challenging it. The rules are set privately, they are opaque, they are chilling to creators, and they cannot be challenged. In addition, these types of private arrangement will tend to linger on; the CCA was not completely defunct until 2011 (although it was severely weakened when Marvel left in 2001).

I'm not trying to make this more than what it is, but at the same time, it pays to be vigilant on this issue.
 

I miss the "oriental" classes: samurai, ninja, sohei. These archetypes shouldn't be only subclasses.

Counterpoint: Yes they should, and no amount of "missing" them justifies them being full classes.

All of them fit very well inside subclasses in 5E. In the original OA, the only justification for their existing as separate classes was that it was 1E, and 1E didn't have a mechanical option that allowed for proper subclasses. In 2E, they had Kits, and that moved all of them to being Kits, which made sense. Since then, every edition has had a suitable mechanical vehicle. In 5E, it is subclass. Samurai is indeed close enough to a broader archetype of "educated courtly warrior" (which occurs in countless cultures, including some Western ones) that it probably shouldn't even be called Samurai as a subclass (we've had this discussion at some length in another thread, I believe - someone came up with a killer suggestion but I forget what it was).

Ninjas do deserve a subclass, but only for "ninja magic". Sohei doesn't even need to be a subclass. It's just a Cleric RP'd in a specific way in 5E terms.

I'm not trying to make this more than what it is, but at the same time, it pays to be vigilant on this issue.

The issue here is, I think one of "crying wolf". People haven't "cried wolf" on private censorship being a "huge problem" once or twice. Or dozens of times, or even hundreds of times. They're in fact constantly "crying wolf" every day, all over the internet. And you can say "ignore them, they're idiots!" and I do, and they are, but it means that an actual discussion on private censorship and any real problems it entails is vulnerable to being derailed into specific discussions of extremely reasonable "censorship" which had the full consent of the artist being "censored", yet are we, we are told, "inherently wrong".

Also, the primary opposition to government regulation of, I dunno, virtually any industry in any country will always be that industry itself. So the idea that it is ever a realistic option seems far-fetched. And if it's not the government, it's not really going to be possible to challenge in court.
 
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Cadence

Legend
Supporter
So an interesting issue with private censorship, such as this, is that of transparency- to creators and to the public (I am speaking of America).

I'm not trying to make this more than what it is, but at the same time, it pays to be vigilant on this issue.

Interesting point, and definitely.

The perniciousness of this type of private censorship is that we have many of the drawbacks of government censorship (not all, private companies can't throw you in jail ... yet) without any real procedural means of challenging it. The rules are set privately, they are opaque, they are chilling to creators, and they cannot be challenged. In addition, these types of private arrangement will tend to linger on; the CCA was not completely defunct until 2011 (although it was severely weakened when Marvel left in 2001).

It feels like it had most of its teeth pulled back in 1971 though.

 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
It feels like it had most of its teeth pulled back in 1971 though.

But did it? There were revisions, but one of the major points was (for example) sexuality.

That's why (and I wish I was making this up) the first same-sex character in Marvel was in .... 1992, and he wasn't actually seen, you know, kissing until 2011.

Enforcing orthodoxy through private means has a long and unhappy history. I don't doubt that the moral guardians who seek to do this always have the best of intentions. And sometimes, maybe they are right. Maybe this time, those who are seeking to enforce a code upon people as to what is, and isn't, acceptable really are correct. I personally agree with the aims (if not the means).

But one thing history shows me is that the principle of non-censorship is worth so much, because I am not wise enough to be the arbiter for other people.
 

ZeshinX

Adventurer
I do miss the 1e OA classes, though I find they all fit perfectly well into the existing 5e classes as subclasses, though perhaps with some form of callback to at least one feature the original OA class contained (since all OA classes had a 'kiai' power of some kind).

*Note: I'm using the spelling of how the 1e class appeared in the 1e OA book (whether they are correct or not)

OA Barbarian: Well...works without doing much at all.
Bushi: Fighter subclass
Kensai: I find this works best, flavour-wise, as a Monk subclass (as shown in XGE)
Samurai: Fighter subclass works best (the XGE version I'm ambivalent about, but it does work)
Monk: Already very well represented in 5e.
Ninja: The Rogue Assassin and Monk Way of Shadow cover this pretty well.
Shukenja: Very clearly a cleric subclass, but also could feel a bit Sorcerer Divine Soul at times.
Sohei: This could easily fit as a cleric, monk or even fighter subclass. I'd try it as a Fighter subclass first, using the Eldritch Knight as a template...swap out the arcane casting with divine (to reflect its 1e half-caster style) and tinker with the subclass abilities to reflect a more defensive/protection set of abilities
Wu Jen: A wizard or sorcerer subclass (or one for either, though at first blush, it strikes me as a better fit for sorcerer...or perhaps even warlock would be better)
Yakuza: Rogue, all the way.
 

Mercurius

Legend
But did it? There were revisions, but one of the major points was (for example) sexuality.

That's why (and I wish I was making this up) the first same-sex character in Marvel was in .... 1992, and he wasn't actually seen, you know, kissing until 2011.

Enforcing orthodoxy through private means has a long and unhappy history. I don't doubt that the moral guardians who seek to do this always have the best of intentions. And sometimes, maybe they are right. Maybe this time, those who are seeking to enforce a code upon people as to what is, and isn't, acceptable really are correct. I personally agree with the aims (if not the means).

But one thing history shows me is that the principle of non-censorship is worth so much, because I am not wise enough to be the arbiter for other people.

I mostly agree, except I do doubt that the "moral guardians"--at least all of them--always have the best intentions. Sometimes they want to sow division or do harm to those they consider "offenders." My suspicion is that the guy who started the latest round with his tweet didn't have the best intentions in mind.

I think the vast majority of us agree with the aim, if the aim is to increase inclusivity. But, yes, there are different ways to Rome. One that doesn't seem to work is accusing those who disagree with the One True Way to be gate-keepers and perpetrators of racism. It just further divides and prevents real understanding.
 

So, YOU don't see any issue with it. The Idea of invading a nation and taking those who don't agree with a specific ideology (that undead is a better state of being than alive - hence the lich) and taking those who fight against it and putting them into work camps until they die is, pretty much, most people's idea of evil. The fact that someone can make a parallel to work camps in WWII and that killing people who don't believe in your ideas for a 'better world' isn't an impossible idea.

It's there even if you have to dig for it. Some people might see that parallel because they've experienced it or have family who have. I could see it as a sincere complaint and you wouldn't be able to just write it off as 'overly sensitive complaining'. People on this board have legitimate complaints about specific content and others have dismissed their complaints. It's a thing, even when it doesn't fit your view of what warrants a complaint.

So, the question is, how do you publish anything when you risk having to pull your books off the shelf? Why pull the books off the shelf at all? This has been raised before about books outside of D&D: Tom Sawyer, To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice & Men. People asked that those books be pulled from libraries and schools. Is it right to do that? Is that how people want their society to function? Or maybe there should be a forward added to new prints of those books to put them into context? Chances are, the rules for what is PC today won't be PC tomorrow, so do we just get rid of all the content from the past or do we educate people about it and continue to release new, up to date material?

It would not be hard to edit a copy of the PDF of Oriental Adventures and add a forward and to add addendums in the book. They release erratas all the time to PDFs that do exactly that.

I agree, release better material but you can't crucify every artist for their material or prevent people from reading it if it eventually suddenly becomes outdated.


Well, people have managed for centuries. I'm sure they will manage for longer.

Seriously, this is exhausting. Was anybody beating down the doors to get the 1e version of the rules? Anybody calling for blood to be spilled?

Yes, some people are calling for the PDF to be no longer sold. No one on this site has agreed with them, not even once that I have noticed. The people behind the books aren't receiving death threats to my knowledge.

And, like you said, this has happened with library books for years.

And calls to do better in the future aren't demands that no one ever read the past ever again.
 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
I mostly agree, except I do doubt that the "moral guardians"--at least all of them--always have the best intentions. Sometimes they want to sow division or do harm to those they consider "offenders." My suspicion is that the guy who started the latest round with his tweet didn't have the best intentions in mind.

I think the vast majority of us agree with the aim, if the aim is to increase inclusivity. But, yes, there are different ways to Rome. One that doesn't seem to work is accusing those who disagree with the One True Way to be gate-keepers and perpetrators of racism. It just further divides and prevents real understanding.

I think that focusing too much on the intentions of the people ends up being a mug's game. It's pretty obvious to me that there is often (but not always) a generational divide; that some (but not all) of the people suddenly finding OA offensive were not old enough to play OA or even 1e, and that many of the misunderstanding that they have come from not understanding either the game or the cultural context of that time.

I can't know what is in another person's heart, and while they might not be accurate in everything, I have no reason to doubt that they find it offensive.

....moreover, I also recognize that times change. "Oriental" is an outdated term. That book (and most of the books for D&D in the 70s and 80s) would not be published today. I respect everything people are doing to make the game more inclusive!

....well, everything short of this campaign to get rid of past books. I just .... well, that's one thing I can never support.
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
Counterpoint: Yes they should, and no amount of "missing" them justifies them being full classes.

All of them fit very well inside subclasses in 5E. In the original OA, the only justification for their existing as separate classes was that it was 1E, and 1E didn't have a mechanical option that allowed for proper subclasses. In 2E, they had Kits, and that moved all of them to being Kits, which made sense.

This is not true. In 2e, ninja was it's own class, belonging to the rogue group. In the same way a paladin was it's own class, but belonged to the warrior group. And why? Because of the varied specialties of the ninja (the warriors, the spies, the magic users, etc--which were what the actual kits were within the ninja class). Which is the best justification for it having it's own class in 5e because 5e's subclass system is made for it perfectly. I.e., a core ninja class of core features, then a subclass for the front line ninja warriors, a subclass for the spies and espionage, and a subclass for the arcane magic users.
 

Ninja as base class had got its own handbook in AD&D, and with kits, the equivalent to subclasses. If I am sincere I imagine them as "martial adepts", classes with (ki) maneuvers, special powers in the middle between at-will and once-encounter, from "Tome of Battle: Book of the Nine Swords". How to explain it better? it helps to sell more the samurai and ninja as martial adept classes than the swordsage or the warblade. It's about the concept of the archetype. A good archetype should to create a fiction story without gameplay at all, or you could notice what class it's with only watching the picture of the PC.

* I start to wonder maybe this is not about how to produce D&D to be sold in the Asian market, but how to create the right pieces to be used by the own Asian fandom or 3PPs to produce Wuxia for D&D players.

* Sohei is like a monk, but with armour and "ki frenzy". It could be a martial adept.



* WotC could work with Asian companies for coproductions, but we know they would rather to keep complete control about the new IPs could be created.

* J-Horror has got a rich mythology. Ravenloft had got some dark domains with "silk & jade" cultures. Why not a J-Horror version of game-live shows as Critical Role?

* Hasbro could produce a new TV conquest show. The contestants are young applicant mangaka and they have only to play D&D as in Critical Role. The DM take turns, and the winner will be hired to publish a manga. The "losers" could find some patron to publish webcomics.
 
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This is not true. In 2e, ninja was it's own class, belonging to the rogue group. In the same way a paladin was it's own class, but belonged to the warrior group. And why? Because of the varied specialties of the ninja (the warriors, the spies, the magic users, etc--which were what the actual kits were within the ninja class). Which is the best justification for it having it's own class in 5e because 5e's subclass system is made for it perfectly. I.e., a core ninja class of core features, then a subclass for the front line ninja warriors, a subclass for the spies and espionage, and a subclass for the arcane magic users.

I stand corrected - I still don't think it needs to be a class in 5E though.
 

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