D&D General "I have Played in or Run a Campaign Set in the Forgotten Realms" (a poll)

True or False: "I have Played in or Run a Campaign Set in the Forgotten Realms"

  • True.

    Votes: 182 84.3%
  • False.

    Votes: 34 15.7%

Lanefan

Victoria Rules
Being perfectly honest, I think FR is massively over-hyped, and rather substantially under-delivers in terms of flavor, quality, and interest. I'm dead sure Mr. Greenwood's personal work is much better, but most implementations I see of FR are so shallow and generic, you'd never know it was FR if you just altered the names.
The late 1e-era box set (i.e. FR Mark I) was pretty good, and the 3e hardcover version was pretty good, but that's it. With having those two, I can happily ignore all the rest of it. :)
 

log in or register to remove this ad



jgsugden

Legend
Heh. My old homebrew had a similar set up. "The Pillar of Hell" (in which resided the Nine Hells) existed within the Abyss.
Yeah - in the current interpretation of my lore, the Far Realm collided with the Prime Universe and left a crack in the center of Hell that goes to the Far Realm - the only true connecting point. The influence of the Far Realm corrupted Devils into Demons, created aberrations, shattered the Prime Material Plane to create the transitive planes, etc...

Now, the forces of the Abyss Wage their Blood War in order to capture the Gate to the Far Realm and Asmodeus does everything to protect it from them.

It really works for my setting as core lore.
 

el-remmen

Moderator Emeritus
The influence of the Far Realm corrupted Devils into Demons

Ha! The opposite of my idea. . . where some demons, chaotic expressions of evil in the Abyss, turned towards law and order and built the Pillar of Hell, which the demons are always trying to tear down.
 

Hex08

Adventurer
Yes, some of my favorite campaigns are from ones I ran using 2nd Edition in the Forgotten Realms. My most fondly remembered one was based on a group of heroes who hailed from Corm Orp. I preferred Greyhawk as a setting though. In 3.x I ran some in the Realms but not nearly as much, after that I moved on to other games and settings.
 


The late 1e-era box set (i.e. FR Mark I) was pretty good, and the 3e hardcover version was pretty good, but that's it. With having those two, I can happily ignore all the rest of it. :)
I was more referring to the campaigns and stories set in it, rather than the published guidebooks or the like. For example, the Baldur's Gate series has barely anything to do with being in the Forgotten Realms, for example. There probably aren't many fans of FR who know nothing about the game series. But if there are, I suspect they would not be able to tell it was an FR story if they got a "names changed to protect the innocent" version told to them.

The Forgotten Realms is just so terribly, terribly bland in the implementations I've seen. Being a fantasy kitchen sink doesn't mean a setting needs to be unflavored oatmeal. My own home setting, for example, is very much a kitchen sink (though Arabian Nights/Golden Age of Islam-flavored, rather than pseudo-medieval faux-European) and I would say it is not at all bland.
 

jdrakeh

Front Range Warlock
True, but familiarity breeds contempt. It has become my least favorite D&D setting by a large margin and, when I am forced to DM a game set there, I use the original grey box only and a handful of the FR accessories. Nothing else if I can help it.
 


Lanefan

Victoria Rules
The Forgotten Realms is just so terribly, terribly bland in the implementations I've seen. Being a fantasy kitchen sink doesn't mean a setting needs to be unflavored oatmeal. My own home setting, for example, is very much a kitchen sink (though Arabian Nights/Golden Age of Islam-flavored, rather than pseudo-medieval faux-European) and I would say it is not at all bland.
Of course you'd say that. :) It's your setting, and you're invested in it.

Same for mine. I'd personally say it's not at all bland; but that's because I made it, I know it well, and I know what it has going for it. That said, were I to bang my setting together, put it in a box, and sell it for all I know many might think it just as bland as FR.
 



Gradine

Final Form (she/they)
I came close to it, playing in the initial session of a LMoP campaign, but that campaign fizzled after the first session. Otherwise, to my actual shock, I can't say that I have played in a FR campaign.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
I played a lot of FR back in AD&D 2nd times. I played a bard, but every other player at the table I joined knew so much more about FR because they had read a bunch of novels and such. I really worked to up my FR knowledge.

Then I played it with other DMs in later editions, and found that knowing a lot of the lore was a trap. Because if the DM doesn't know a specific piece of lore it's not true, and you don't know what exactly the DM knows. You look at big plots with big NPCs, and find out later that because you had knowledge the DM didn't, you've been looking in the wrong direction. Combined with not having information the DM expected everyone to have so you also couldn't connect the real dots.

I played Fr in 3e, 3.5, 4e and 5e. I've grown to hate it. It has too much lore, a real barrier to entry. You can't effectively use "I'm running in the FR" as a shortcut to a shared understanding with people you haven't gamed with, it's actively misleading. And I've grown to actively despise the thrice damned kitchen sink nature of it. Take races like the Warforged which have a rich and connected history in Eberron where they come from, and just snip it off until you have just the mechanics of the race and dump it in with a minimal explanation and localization.

I hope never to have to play in the Forgotten Realms again. Ever. But I probably will, with a DM wanting to run a hardcover campaign set there.
 

I ran FR pretty extensively after I played Pool of Radiance in 88. But somewhere around 3.5E I branched off and just did homebrew settings, with the occasional Athas.
 

Ath-kethin

Elder Thing
Simple question. . .

True or False: "I have Played in or Run a Campaign Set in the Forgotten Realms"

By campaign, I mean any ongoing multi-session game with the same characters - so mini-campaigns are fine, but not one-offs.

If you want to add details about which edition/version/changes you made (or were made in the version you played a character in), go for it!
If we count Al-Qadim, which I absolutely do not, then my answer is yes.

But since I do not count Al-Qadim, and have always both run and viewed it as completely distinct from the Realms, my answer is a solid "no."
 

wicked cool

Adventurer
I have played in multiple games set in the Forgotten Realms. When I was running campaign settings straight I mostly did Greyhawk and Ravenloft and left the Realms to be my friends' domain to run.

I like a lot of elements of the Realms, but mostly just incorporate stuff into my mashup homebrew setting as a DM. I particularly like a lot of god elements and include them as distinct pantheons in my setting. Red Wizards are some of my favorite D&D villains although I have not used them a lot in my games (Hazlik in Ravenloft came up occasionally).
How did you use hazlik?
 

I have done both. I played in a Fae'run game (set in the Lake of Steam) and ran Waterdeep Dragon Heist. To be honest I don't really like the setting, but I've come to enjoy it a bit more after doing Dragon Heist.
 

Voadam

Legend
How did you use hazlik?
When I was running Ravenloft he mostly came up as a reference about a magocracy in the south east. When the wizards in the two groups I ran through Ravenloft campaigns asked about known wizards he would come up along with the Wizard-King of the North. They never followed up by going to Hazlan's realm, instead focusing on hooks in other domains.
 

Dungeon Delver's Guide

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top