D&D General I really LOVE Stomping Goblins

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Right. Which again shows how the alignment system is utterly useless, as people never agree what things mean.
I'll always love the Alignment system for heavily influencing D&D's take on devils to the point that a Forgotten Realms novel apparently has a granddaughter of Glasya (and therefore great-granddaughter of Asmodeus himself) worried about the imp underling of hers that has filed a formal complaint against her that'll look bad on her record.

The idea that devil society can be so Lawful that it actually somewhat impacts their ability to do Evil is just really amusing to me.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen (She/Her/Hers)
Its almost like it is a fun game mechanic that lets you know what to kill and which magic items you can use without getting a headache, rather than trying to simulate actual psychological nuances.
I’m not inherently opposed to the idea of a game mechanic that categorizes characters by their moral character. The 9-alignment system just does a poor job at it.
 



I get that sometimes you might not want to think deeply and just commit some fictional violence. But I really don't get why you would then care about the moral aspect at all? Why you need to justify it? Why can't your character just kill the goblins, why it matters who's good or bad in this scenario? We aren't thinking deeply about morals after all.
 
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Cadence

Legend
Supporter
I’m not really a comic book girl, so I can’t speak much to the relative nuance of various comic book villains. From an outside perspective, they all pretty much look cartoonishly evil, with varying levels of explanatory backstory and/or internal conflict. Are explanatory backstory and internal conflict nuance? Yeah, I guess, they’re just minor as nuance goes.

It’s also maybe not the best analogy because these are individual characters, whereas goblins are a group. It might be more apropos to ask if, like, the Ten Rings is more nuanced than Hydra.

Not defending the alignment system...

I picture the "nuanced group" as a few or all of planning and sticking to them, making alliances they keep, playing for the long term, and wanting to build things (even if they're somewhere between very self-serving and horrific). One site (looking up the alignment label I used previously) suggests Raistlin, the Malfoys, Professor Moriarty, and Johnnie Marcone.

I picture the "un-nuanced group" as not doing the first three well if at all, and not having anything we would view as coherent for what they'd like to build. This seems like the way OP described the Goblins in his world. The site suggested the Reavers from Firefly, Gregor Clegane, Apep, and most slasher flick villains.
 

Scribe

Hero
I get that sometimes you might just want think deeply and just do commit some fictional violence. But I really don't get why you would then care about the moral aspect at all? Why you need to justify it? Why can't your character just kill the goblins, why it matters who's good or bad in this scenario? We aren't thinking deeply about morals after all.
I think that this is the point of the thread?

Sometimes, you just want to get in there and start swinging for the fences to see how far you can launch your next target through the window.
 


payn

Legend
I get that sometimes you might just want think deeply and just do commit some fictional violence. But I really don't get why you would then care about the moral aspect at all? Why you need to justify it? Why can't your character just kill the goblins, why it matters who's good or bad in this scenario? We aren't thinking deeply about morals after all.
Evil Dead Ash GIF
 


Vaalingrade

Legend
I get that sometimes you might just want think deeply and just do commit some fictional violence. But I really don't get why you would then care about the moral aspect at all? Why you need to justify it? Why can't your character just kill the goblins, why it matters who's good or bad in this scenario? We aren't thinking deeply about morals after all.
Because people want to feel like they're the hero of their story. Only cartoon bad guys, edgelords and false martyrs think they're the bad guy. So everything they do must be framed as something righteous.

It's why the original I Am Legend/Omega Man had so much impact. It was a sucker punch to realize that the main character, the protagonist in fact was the terrifying monster and not the scary freaks we were told to hate via viewpoint.
 






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