D&D General Iconic and Best Adventures in each Edition

B: Rahasia, Silver Princess.
X: Nomads/Temple , Amber.
1st: Cult Reptile, UK2/UK3
2nd: Never played.
3rd: Barrow/Spire/YuanTi triplet
PF1: Kingmaker, Feast Ravenmoor.
4th: only played a tiny amount
5th: SKT, CoS

Non-TSR/Paizo

Starstone by Northern Sages
Buckets Homebrew
 

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Staffan

Legend
I came here expecting to talk about Dragon's Crown as I usually do in these threads, but I see the OP already did that.
  • Dragon's Crown: captures the feeling of Dark Sun setting, epic voyage
So instead I'll give another mention to Red Hand of Doom, which I think is the quintessential 3e adventure. It does some fun stuff within the system, and uses many of the more interesting monsters from later in the release cycle (particularly dragonspawn) as well as leveled NPCs. And plot-wise, it is neat that it is separated into several smaller locations rather than a big megadungeon, and that the success of each sub-adventure has bearing on the Big Fight later on (essentially, you're trying to remove the supporting forces from the big invasion army).
 

Rabbitbait

Grog-nerd
I came here expecting to talk about Dragon's Crown as I usually do in these threads, but I see the OP already did that.

So instead I'll give another mention to Red Hand of Doom, which I think is the quintessential 3e adventure. It does some fun stuff within the system, and uses many of the more interesting monsters from later in the release cycle (particularly dragonspawn) as well as leveled NPCs. And plot-wise, it is neat that it is separated into several smaller locations rather than a big megadungeon, and that the success of each sub-adventure has bearing on the Big Fight later on (essentially, you're trying to remove the supporting forces from the big invasion army).
I loved every aspect of that adventure except the conclusion (Tiamat) which just seemed a bit generic compared to the rest of it.
 

Staffan

Legend
I loved every aspect of that adventure except the conclusion (Tiamat) which just seemed a bit generic compared to the rest of it.
I had been a bit too generous with the PC creation rules, so I was compensating by boosting the opposition a bit. And then I checked the stats of the Ghost Lord and went "Really? CR 13 and topping out at 4th level spells (plus a 5th level spell already cast)? Nope, I'm gonna have to rewrite that Blighter* prestige class." And so I did, changing it so instead of having Blighter casting replace druid casting, it would add onto it like a normal PrC. And since I was already boosting everything, I gave him another level for good measure.

And of course, the Ghost Lord utterly massacred my poor PCs. The difference between one 11d6 flame strike on one hand, and finger of death and harm on the other, was quite pronounced. I think one of them managed to run away, but that pretty much ended the campaign for my group.

I still think my initial instinct that "There's no way that that's CR 13" was correct, but I definitely overcompensated. One of many examples of how 3e's rules for CR were, well, bad.

* Blighter was a prestige class for ex-druids turning to necromancy, sort of like the Blackguard for paladins, except they started over from 1st level spells but got one spell level per class level instead of per two as usual. So ex-druid 6/blighter 5 could cast 5th level spells, but in this case the 5th level spell was create undead which had already been cast off-screen.
 

pukunui

Legend
I had been a bit too generous with the PC creation rules, so I was compensating by boosting the opposition a bit. And then I checked the stats of the Ghost Lord and went "Really? CR 13 and topping out at 4th level spells (plus a 5th level spell already cast)? Nope, I'm gonna have to rewrite that Blighter* prestige class." And so I did, changing it so instead of having Blighter casting replace druid casting, it would add onto it like a normal PrC. And since I was already boosting everything, I gave him another level for good measure.

And of course, the Ghost Lord utterly massacred my poor PCs. The difference between one 11d6 flame strike on one hand, and finger of death and harm on the other, was quite pronounced. I think one of them managed to run away, but that pretty much ended the campaign for my group.

I still think my initial instinct that "There's no way that that's CR 13" was correct, but I definitely overcompensated. One of many examples of how 3e's rules for CR were, well, bad.

* Blighter was a prestige class for ex-druids turning to necromancy, sort of like the Blackguard for paladins, except they started over from 1st level spells but got one spell level per class level instead of per two as usual. So ex-druid 6/blighter 5 could cast 5th level spells, but in this case the 5th level spell was create undead which had already been cast off-screen.
I did a similar thing with the main hobgoblin general who leads the assault on Brindol. (Can't remember his name, but he was meant to be a Talon of Tiamat.) I thought he would go down too quickly and so overcompensated by making him too OP. I think the PCs did manage to defeat him, but it was a bit of a pyrrhic victory.

The closest we got to a TPK was during the black dragonspawn assassin ambush. I think only one PC survived that.

I loved every aspect of that adventure except the conclusion (Tiamat) which just seemed a bit generic compared to the rest of it.
When I ran RHoD, I didn't bother with that last part. We were all feeling pretty burnt out on 3.5e anyway, so we stopped after the Battle of Brindol.
 



Enrico Poli1

Adventurer
1E and 2E are separate editions and cover an awful lot of time, they should probably be covered separately. I'd also say there's a huge difference between "best regarded", "must play" and "most iconic" - it's easy for an adventure only be one of those three.

I've never even heard of The City of Skulls and I've been playing since 1989 so I have difficulty believing it's that iconic. Seems to be an obscure 1993 mid-level Greyhawk module.

The biggest 2E adventures I'm aware of are probably:

Dragon Mountain

The Night Below

Dead Gods (and possibly other Monte Cook ones - definitely not Faction War though!)
Do yourself a favor and try The City of Skulls. It's the only worthy rescue mission adventure in the history of the game (that I know of).
 


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