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General I'm reading the Forgotten Realms Novels- #080 The Simbul's Gift by Lynn Abbey (Nobles 6)

Alzrius

The EN World kitten
This is another book I haven't read in a very long time, so I'm having to dig through some rather dusty memories of my impression of this book.

I think the biggest one was that I didn't care very much for Elaine Cunningham's writing style. While it's far more disciplined than Ed Greenwood's, and the characters somewhat rounder, I vaguely recall being somewhat frustrated with how the plot progressed. Everyone just seemed to be spinning their wheels for a large portion of the book, investigating people and advancing agendas that felt like they should have taken a fraction of the time. There was also a lot of tiptoeing around sensitive topics that were probably meant to be political intrigue, but came across as needless posturing around stakes that didn't seem nearly as high as everyone acted like they were. The villain's scheme felt overly elaborate and the method used to enact it hinged upon being ill-defined; when the answer to the mystery turns out to be "some bit of magic that you've never heard of (until it's just about to be revealed)" then it honestly feels like the rules are being made up as we go along.

It wasn't the worst Realms novel I've read, but it wouldn't make my top ten or even top twenty either.
 

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Goonalan

Adventurer
Supporter
This is another book I haven't read in a very long time, so I'm having to dig through some rather dusty memories of my impression of this book.

I think the biggest one was that I didn't care very much for Elaine Cunningham's writing style. While it's far more disciplined than Ed Greenwood's, and the characters somewhat rounder, I vaguely recall being somewhat frustrated with how the plot progressed. Everyone just seemed to be spinning their wheels for a large portion of the book, investigating people and advancing agendas that felt like they should have taken a fraction of the time. There was also a lot of tiptoeing around sensitive topics that were probably meant to be political intrigue, but came across as needless posturing around stakes that didn't seem nearly as high as everyone acted like they were. The villain's scheme felt overly elaborate and the method used to enact it hinged upon being ill-defined; when the answer to the mystery turns out to be "some bit of magic that you've never heard of (until it's just about to be revealed)" then it honestly feels like the rules are being made up as we go along.

It wasn't the worst Realms novel I've read, but it wouldn't make my top ten or even top twenty either.
There's a bit of me thought that the spinning wheels, plates in the air style ongoing plot/sub-plot-plottings and schemes was all to do with something that'll be along next... in Songs & Swords #2- Elfsong, but I'm prepared to be wrong. It's a way of being.

I didn't mind the writing style, because a change is as good as a rest, and besides (for me) a large chunk of this endeavour is about learning new things about the people and the places of the Realms, as long as the text is palatable then I'm in for a penny.

It was an easy read, the last page always made me want to read the next page- there was a bit of the twisty-turny stuff but not enough to make me lose my page. A lot of it, wouldn't you know, was just fluff on it- but, again, that's to be expected.

I said in my write up that I guessed the end of level villain pretty early, part of the reason I didn't swap horses as I read on was down to the fact that Kymil (SPOILER) was being deliberately distanced from the action by the author. A case of 'nothing to see here', which is often a good sign- the potential fall guys for the Harper assassin gig (an assassin of Harpers, just to make clear) were too much front and centre, kinda 'here they are...' jiggle-jiggle.

That said I loved the Serpent's off-hand, '...and by the way, I've put a price on your head, you may want to get a hat. Have a nice day y'all', to Danilo as the best line in the book, or at least the best line delivered in dialogue.

Part of this, again- for me, is about stocking my DM NPC cupboard with characters (as well as places & things & plots &...). So, I'm gonna get me some Elaith Craulnober, although I'm going to have to refer to the guy as the Serpent, or Elaith, because the 50-something year old kids I GM are going to get leery (and juvenile) with anyone calling themselves Craulnober (Crawl(or Cruel)-knobber etc.). But I'm having this guy in one of my future productions, same for Khelben- I wish I knew about these folk earlier.

That kind of thing, in essence, is what I'm doing here.

Also, I didn't mind that Khelben (like Big Ellie) had set himself up as the arbiter of what's right and proper- sacrifices may have to be made, sure a few people got killed but- the greater good. A bit of hubris here and there makes the world go around, and reinforces a few of my own real-world views.

Thanks for reading & commenting, always appreciated.

Cheers Goonalan
 

Beleriphon

Totally Awesome Pirate Brain
Also, I didn't mind that Khelben (like Big Ellie) had set himself up as the arbiter of what's right and proper- sacrifices may have to be made, sure a few people got killed but- the greater good. A bit of hubris here and there makes the world go around, and reinforces a few of my own real-world views.
Khelben has always been portrayed as such. Elminster is that crazy, but fun great-uncle, that you didn't know is actually John Wick. Khelben is a politician that "understands" realpolitick, sure he has your best interests at heart but he'll make the "hard" decisions.
 

Goonalan

Adventurer
Supporter
#053 Red Magic by Jean Rabe (Harpers 3)
Read 22/2/20 to 26/2/20


Forgotten Realms Red Magic (Harpers 3) a.JPG

Book 3- and... I'm really not sure about this one. I just don't see it- it seems awfully contrived, but let's just get the caveats in at the start.

Another Harper story (obv), Galvin is a Harper Druid- he doesn't like cities, civilisation and, well... people. Wynter is a Harper Centaur, the pair hang out (perhaps) somewhere close to Thay. Brenna is an Aglarond politician (and Sorcerer) with seemingly no experience of adventuring, and the various hardships that it entails- one could ask how she came by all those Sorcerer levels but... I'll leave it for now.

Aglarond (and Brenna) think that a/some Red Wizards are looking to expand their operations, building an army (perhaps) to invade Aglarond. The three somehow come up with the ruse of travelling to Amruthar (in Thay) to do a little spying. Tbh Wynter is ex-of the district, so the Centaur's suited to the operation, although he's also mostly a pacifist, and absolutely against slavery (and Thay is full of slaves) so... not entirely ideal for an undercover op. Oh, and did I mention that Galvin hates cities (and people), and Brenna isn't an adventurer. So, if you could pick three people not to do this job then, well- these would be the three, particularly in their present configuration.

An example of this occurs when the trio get to Amruthar, the trio (every where they go) stand out like a sore thumb- Galvin (in the role of slave to Brenna) is constantly acting otherwise, and doing things that you figure your average slave would be punished ten times over for. Wynter buys a mixed bag of Dwarf slaves, who then treat the three heroes as figures of fun, constantly jeopardising the mission. It's the idiocy of some it that I can't stand. It comes across as action from around the gaming table, but not in a good way- with the DM just letting the PCs continue to get away with it.

Oops, I was upposed to be telling you about the things I liked about this one before I started digging in to it.

So, I like Thay- I dig the Red Wizards, Maligor (the bad guy) and in particular Szass Tam, the Lich is the coolest guy in the book by some distance. But the things he does... I don't get it.

I'll explain some more.

Maligor the Red Wizard is out to grab himself a bigger chunk of the action (mostly at the expensive of Tam), pretending to get his army of Gnolls together while secretly building a second army of Darkenbeasts, the real target are the gold mines of Thay.

So, the adventuresome trio nose around Amruthar, they're Mr. Bean-esque at keeping their head down, they make three Gather Information checks (although mostly unseen) and find out what they need to know. It doesn't seem that credible- the Red Wizards constantly at war amongst themselves, a world of falsehood and intrigue and they just bowl in and get the lowdown.

The trio are so bad at it however they eventually get captured by Szass Tam, and keep in mind this guy has Vampires to pick up his socks, so what does he do- he gives our heroic trio a force of (over 100) undead troops to play with and orders them to go fetch Maligor.

The Druid's not a general (I doubt he's even had any experience), Wynter's actually an ex-slave plantation boss (sorta) so he might know what he's doing but he doesn't, and soon after for no easy to explain reason gets attacked and Feebleminded (don't worry, he gets better) by a Yellow Musk Creeper. Brenna has never been adventuring before, I may have already mentioned this.

But anyway, the trio get an army to play with- on pain of death, and worse- Szass is threatening to invade Aglarond. So, okay, I'll buy it- a little bit, but... but, oh it just doesn't get any better.

I'll not worry you with the rest of it, just a few highlights-

Galvin nearly loses it when he discovers that Maligor has been using innocent woodland creatures to make the Darkenbeasts, there's a scene in which he cries over a dead mole/bunny and then swears to kill Maligor. I get that he's a Druid but just out of the window two thirds of the population of Thay are slaves, beaten and broken, and... save the bunnies!

There's a Spirit Naga, tres tough- she gets killed by in three rounds, without the heroes breaking sweat.

The second coolest kids in the book are the Wraiths, I'd read a book about these guys, they sound like a barrel-of-laughs.

In truth I can't think of any more highlights, it's just... an incredible (by which I mean absolutely unbelievable) story that could have only played out around a gaming table, aided by a slew of natural '20's.

I'm not even sure I'm that convinced by the location- if Thay's all that- a paranoid playground for high powered (archmage) Red Wizards then how come our three heroes can march around the place looking (and acting) like they're doing their best not to fit in, and still keep their lives. Is Thay some sort of grand conspiracy- the Red Wizards are all evil bastards, while the populace merrily whistle happy tunes and help the kind folk on their way.

Oh, and Brenna falls in love with Galvin, because... he's such a hero/nice guy.

And of course they all escape to do it again, probably.

I'm really starting to dislike the Harpers. Greenwood's guys seem like they're born again bad, and about Level 12 when they're first sent in to action. This duo (like a couple of the other semi-flakes in this series (so far)) seem ideally suited to other occupations, they survive and thrive against all the odds- they're not particularly adept, or clever, or... they're the kids with 'A' for effort on their reports, but no actual qualifications.

I didn't like it.

Read.
 
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Alzrius

The EN World kitten
It's entirely possible that I'm overemphasizing this, but every depiction of Szass Tam I read seems to be different from the others. It's like none of the authors can quite agree on his character, and while the various appearances he makes aren't wildly different, the takes on him are all subtly dissimilar.

In this story (Red Magic), he comes across as your stereotypical lich necromancer, going on about how "death is my domain" and comes across as treating everyone with an austere sort of cruelty, a sort of "you'll do what I order you to, or you'll die in agony and then serve me for eternity" take to dealing with things.

In The Crimson Gold, he seems much more (for lack of a better term) affable. He tries to kill Tazi (the heroine of the novel) with kindness, presenting himself as being an almost-benevolent figure. More than that, he seems almost like a jaded romantic, appreciating her presence to a degree that even he finds surprising. (As always, this is what I remember years after reading the book, so take this with a grain of salt.)

In the Haunted Lands trilogy, Tam comes across as pragmatic without being unemotional. He's laser-focused on his goals and treats his underlings with respect even as he's killing them. He doesn't engage in wanton cruelty, but doesn't hesitate to do whatever he has to in order to win, using raw power and honest conversation in accordance with whichever he thinks will serve him best.

All three are interesting characters, but they don't feel like the same character.
 

Dire Bare

Legend
Supporter
It's entirely possible that I'm overemphasizing this, but every depiction of Szass Tam I read seems to be different from the others. It's like none of the authors can quite agree on his character, and while the various appearances he makes aren't wildly different, the takes on him are all subtly dissimilar.

In this story (Red Magic), he comes across as your stereotypical lich necromancer, going on about how "death is my domain" and comes across as treating everyone with an austere sort of cruelty, a sort of "you'll do what I order you to, or you'll die in agony and then serve me for eternity" take to dealing with things.

In The Crimson Gold, he seems much more (for lack of a better term) affable. He tries to kill Tazi (the heroine of the novel) with kindness, presenting himself as being an almost-benevolent figure. More than that, he seems almost like a jaded romantic, appreciating her presence to a degree that even he finds surprising. (As always, this is what I remember years after reading the book, so take this with a grain of salt.)

In the Haunted Lands trilogy, Tam comes across as pragmatic without being unemotional. He's laser-focused on his goals and treats his underlings with respect even as he's killing them. He doesn't engage in wanton cruelty, but doesn't hesitate to do whatever he has to in order to win, using raw power and honest conversation in accordance with whichever he thinks will serve him best.

All three are interesting characters, but they don't feel like the same character.
Such is the perils of shared world fiction . . . .

I totally agree, and have vague memories of this from back in the day, although I read each of those novels (and novel series) years apart and many years ago.

While it wasn't true character progression within the context of the stories and setting, I did enjoy how Szass Tam's character evolved and really liked the portrayal in the "Haunted Lands" trilogy.
 

Goonalan

Adventurer
Supporter
#054 The Night Parade by Scott Ciencin (Harpers 4)
Read 27/2/20 to 29/2/20


Forgotten Realms The Night Parade (Harpers 4) a.JPG

Book 4- and where to start...

Myrmeen Lhal is a right royal pain in the backside, a bit spoilt, a bit childish (and arrogant) and bit like a crazy tornado of (often conflicting) emotions that spins in and out of control. She's hard to like, at times, and yet... there's something here, and I don't just mean the fact this she is (according to the author) the God's gift to all men (et al). Myrmeen's sexual allure (Charisma), is a straight '18', possibly with a few enhancements. But that's not it- the reason I decided to like Myrmeen, in the end, is because she finally does the right thing with regard to her long lost daughters Krystan (not her daughter) and Lynelle.

The amount of folk that get killed along the way to the finale must run into the thousands, not that Myrmeen is to blame for this, she (mostly) only kills bad guys and her Harper friends.

But I get this- she's all over the place at the start, and in the groove by the end- it's all arc, so to be expected, move on.

It's a dark number this novel, in Calimport where the Night Parade lives, and lusts, and gathers for the coming storm. The 'coming storm' being a Herod-like affair in which every newborn is collected, and sacrificed at the altar of the extra-dimensional (Foulspawn? Or else some earlier edition aberrant variant) being that fuels the Night Parade's fire. The sacrificed are born again- made into new monstrosities. The Night Born then are mostly Human in shape (by day) but perhaps carved from a cruder/crazier clay- all sinew, muscle and ooze; or else bloody feathers and bone- they're mutant emotional vampires, often with super-powers (just one each). They reminded me of the mutant/beastmen (et al) I so loved from early editions of Warhammer FRP.

So, Myrmeen is in search of her lost daughter in Calimport, taken (sold) to the last Night Patrol 'storm' fourteen years previously- or so she thinks. There's a mystery to unravel- there always is, and in the red corner is Lord Sixx (the Night Patrol head honcho) who is remarkably reasonable for the super-villain, content at various times to just let Myrmeen and pals live, and leave. There are lots of bit part players- for the good guys and the bad, and we get to glimpse a myriad of their stories, although if the characters are Harpers then you might want to toss a coin, to see if they survive.

It's a mess of a book in places, not because its badly written (specifically) because there's a lot to keep tabs on, and the action meanders, and the amount of added histories, or backstories, or reveals keeps piling up all of the time. Too much for me to report here, certainly.

But just to say, Lucius the happy magic user who mostly doesn't want what Myrmeen is selling (sex) is an absolute mystery to me. Why's he here, and why does he have to die... it's beyond me. Is the lesson- good folk, that behave bravely/well/sensibly/intelligently etc. who don't simply 'fall' for the hero/ine, and who are supremely content with their own lives, and their own families, well... they have to die. Or rather to sacrifice themselves so that the emotional gadabout (heroine) can finally figure its time to grow up, and stop just going with an emotional response (women!).

Again, some of it left me unsure of quite how to respond to it.

How the hell has Myrmeen ruled Araby for the past I don't know how long, she tells us at various stages about the kind of things that she has experienced as a city ruler- the schemes and ventures of other powerful men, trying to get one over her (and her people- but mostly 'over her', its a sex thing). And yet she's a spiralling disaster area (at times)- single-minded, and prepared to see it through to the end (and give her life) but... There was a time, early on- admittedly, when I started to think of her Harper companions as sword-wielding nannies for the brattish Myrmeen.

Therefore skip to the end- the 'storm' comes, the last decent Harper standing Reisz goes away and then come back again- just in time. The other Harper still standing- Ord, gets killed doing the right thing (at last) and then he too comes back again, fingers-crossed, he wasn't dead. The second coming of the Night Patrol is parading, the citizens of Calimport enthralled, and queuing around the block to start their suffering. Into the weird maelstrom comes our heroes- to give their lives, and hearts, and... all the usual heroic traits and tropes, to stop the party.

Which they do! What a shocker.

Myrmeen, Krystan and Reisz (and Ord) win through in the end- these four have gone the furthest on their journeys (although perhaps not Reisz) and remain steadfast to the end.

It's about Love, stupid!

There's some stuff here which I still don't get, or like, or... that just keeps me from liking it more.

To recap, I liked the idea(s) more than the execution, I struggled with the central character but came out in favour of her by the finale (just). There's plenty here to take away, other bits seemed like a bit lazy stereotype (women), other parts as if the author was just trying to hard to keep burying (and then revealing) various red herrings, plot asides, sub-plot intrigues, new and strange characters (that serve no actual purpose)- a bit of a sprawling mess, but y'know- readable.

Read.

Read.
 



Goonalan

Adventurer
Supporter
#055 The Ring of Winter by James Lowder (Harpers 5)
Read 1/3/20 to 4/3/20


Forgotten Realms The Ring of Winter (Harpers 5) a.JPG

Book 5- and the best of the Harper's yet, and for a variety of reasons.

Here's the thing... I love me some Chult, I did a lot of DMing (back in the day) in the Amedio Jungle (Greyhawk) and then when Tomb of Annihilation came out, and I read it- I wanted to head right back to it, in-game. Alas the opportunity has not arisen thus far, but I'm keen... very keen, and keener still now I've read this one.

So, Artus Cimber and his side-kick mage Pontifax (great name) are after the Ring of Winter, but the search is only the pointer, the journey is everything. The boat trip to Chult was okay but once we arrived in Chult I was all ears, trying to pick up as much as could to use in my game.

There are a bunch of bad guys in this one- the Batiri Goblins and Queen M'bobo, very nice- and well developed in ToA. Does Chult feature in any of the other FR novels? Please say, yes.

The big bad however is Kaverin Ebonhand, who's suitably Bond Villain- although also haunted by the spirits of Cyric, so that's good too. Skuld is a crazy good hench-bastard, terrifyingly effective and almost impossible to kill- and with good (simple) lines, he's going to turn up somewhere in one of my games- promise.

Then there's Mezro itself, hidden city/civilisation, and once there the living embodiments of the one Chultan god- Ubtao, the immortal paladins/protectors of the hidden realm/jungle- the Bara (including Ras Nsi).

It was great when Rayburton turned out to be not at all like the Rayburton you imagined (or else I imagined).

There's a lot to like here, and yet- why do I always have to complain? I'd like more- more time with the Batiri (and other villains), more time with dinosaurs and the dangers of the jungle, more time in Mezro (and with the Bara). There's just a pile of stuff in this one that's just hinted at, or else not explored in any great depth (I get why- page count) but I am gagging for more info. I want to spend more time in Chult and with all of the above.

Oh, but the story- Artus (eventually) finds the Ring of Winter and thusly wins the war, obviously it's a lot more complicated than that- we get to go places, meet new people (most of whom are actually quite nice, even the villains) and see lots of cool things. There's a bit of action (fighting) although its not a massive chunk of the tale, there's a ton of exploration (people and places), and... that's mostly it.

I didn't get Lugg and Byrt- talking Wombats, for some reason my brain went to the Phanatons (is that right) from X1- kinda token cute furry-folk with a simplistic (sorta) way of looking at the world. I love Lugg and Byrt's names, and their chatter, but not the idea of wombats- don't ask me, I'm not sure why not. I get that they're not native to Chult but they were (imho) Dwarf/Ivan & Pikel replacements. I think I would have preferred just plain old Dwarves, again- I get why that would be difficult, you can't keep having comedy Dwarf double acts, but... Wombats. It's just difficult for me to do in-game, or else I just don't wanna. Nice idea- under the confusion wall, but not my fave characters.

The rest... satisfying, and great detail (although I really did want more)- I loved the chatter with Ibn Engaruka "do you see?" I could have spent another 20-30 pages right here with Artus making plans... lots to admire, but over too soon, much too soon.

Is there more Chult to look forward to? Anyone know?

Read.
 

Alzrius

The EN World kitten
Insofar as I'm aware, there aren't any further novels set in Chult. But then again, I haven't read all of the available Forgotten Realms novels, so take that for what it's worth.

This one was a decent enough book, and I think that James Lowder is a very talented writer (I love love love Knight of the Black Rose), but this story never quite hit on all cylinders for me. And in all honesty, that's less the story's fault than how it never quite seemed to fit with literally everything else across the spectrum of D&D that tried to connect with it:
  • The people of Chult are a human ethnicity called tabaxi? Huh, I thought that was the name of jaguar people from the Monstrous Manual (Lowder would try to reconcile the distinction in FRM1 The Jungles of Chult, but it didn't really work).
  • The idea of a back-and-forth between gods over getting to decide your afterlife is funny, but the wider implications are problematic. Nothing else suggests that where you die has any bearing on what gods get to decide what happens to your soul, save for one minor point that I recall being in the Player's Guide to Faerun (I think it was that book) in D&D 3.5, where it was casually dropped that there were four different cosmologies - for Faerun, Kara-Tur, Zakhara, and Maztica - and which ones you could access with planar magic depended on where you were when you used your spell/magic item.
  • So Artus had a major artifact, one which gave him ridiculously-potent powers over cold, immortality, and boosted all of his magic items...and then he disappears from the world. Seriously, after this novel, we don't see him again (insofar as I know) until Tomb of Annihilation, over a century later.
  • Maybe it's because I didn't read FRM1 The Jungles of Chult closely enough, but the focus on the Batiri goblins in this novel (and that one necromantic Bara) never stuck with me nearly as much as the entry for Ubtao's evil alter-ego deity Eshowdow and the eshowe people from Powers & Pantheons. But I don't recall those being in the novel at all.
A few other thoughts: Skuld, for some reason, always made me think of an evil, humorless version of the genie from Disney's Aladdin. I can practically hear him giving a song and dance about how "you ain't never had a slave like me." The wombats, likewise, were so low-impact that I can't actually remember them at all, though I suppose that's partially because I don't know what a wombat actually looks like. Also, I think Cyric is a really cool deity, so having his presence be limited to Kaverin's backstory struck me as kind of disappointing.

Overall, I think of this one as maybe a 6 out of 10, but it's not one that I've felt any need to go back and flip through over the years.
 

Goonalan

Adventurer
Supporter
  • The people of Chult are a human ethnicity called tabaxi? Huh, I thought that was the name of jaguar people from the Monstrous Manual (Lowder would try to reconcile the distinction in FRM1 The Jungles of Chult, but it didn't really work).
I thought this but I couldn't go check on my copy of ToA because it's wrapped in bubble wrap in a box in the loft.
  • The idea of a back-and-forth between gods over getting to decide your afterlife is funny, but the wider implications are problematic. Nothing else suggests that where you die has any bearing on what gods get to decide what happens to your soul, save for one minor point that I recall being in the Player's Guide to Faerun (I think it was that book) in D&D 3.5, where it was casually dropped that there were four different cosmologies - for Faerun, Kara-Tur, Zakhara, and Maztica - and which ones you could access with planar magic depended on where you were when you used your spell/magic item.
I'm much less canon when it comes to the gods, I'm a terrible DM- or else my players have no concerns about any of this.
  • So Artus had a major artifact, one which gave him ridiculously-potent powers over cold, immortality, and boosted all of his magic items...and then he disappears from the world. Seriously, after this novel, we don't see him again (insofar as I know) until Tomb of Annihilation, over a century later.
Bugger, I quite liked his Indiana Jones style, I thought we'd see him some more.
  • Maybe it's because I didn't read FRM1 The Jungles of Chult closely enough, but the focus on the Batiri goblins in this novel (and that one necromantic Bara) never stuck with me nearly as much as the entry for Ubtao's evil alter-ego deity Eshowdow and the eshowe people from Powers & Pantheons. But I don't recall those being in the novel at all.
I've never read any of the FR modules alas, perhaps I should.

Thanks for the comprehensive reply, I think I should probably get a hold of the FR novels (buy the PDFs) and have a gander.

Thanks again Goonalan
 

Alzrius

The EN World kitten
Thanks for the comprehensive reply, I think I should probably get a hold of the FR novels (buy the PDFs) and have a gander.
Assuming you meant the sourcebooks and/or modules, I'd recommend the "gods trilogy" of sourcebooks from AD&D 2E: Faiths & Avatars, Powers & Pantheons, and Demihuman Deities. They're truly excellent books, and still represent among the very best works of religions in D&D.

If you want to see what those books are like, check out Auld Dragon's Monster Mythology Update project, where takes other canon D&D deities (mostly from DMGR4 Monster Mythology, which used a much less fleshed-out entry for its deity listings) and rewrites their information into the more expansive F&A-style.
 

Goonalan

Adventurer
Supporter
Assuming you meant the sourcebooks and/or modules, I'd recommend the "gods trilogy" of sourcebooks from AD&D 2E: Faiths & Avatars, Powers & Pantheons, and Demihuman Deities. They're truly excellent books, and still represent among the very best works of religions in D&D.

If you want to see what those books are like, check out Auld Dragon's Monster Mythology Update project, where takes other canon D&D deities (mostly from DMGR4 Monster Mythology, which used a much less fleshed-out entry for its deity listings) and rewrites their information into the more expansive F&A-style.
Apologies, I meant the FR modules.

I'll maybe have a look at the religions, my issue is- as stated above, my players universally really couldn't give a damn about the size and shape of the various deities in the pantheon, the gods- thinking back on it, have never really played much of a role in my games.

Impetus maybe- go help the Church of...

Bad guys, lots of times... they're all dastardly worshippers of...

Don't get me wrong, some of the Players and NPCs/Bad Guys et al have got religion but it's all just surface work, or else (name of deity) is just a handy source of spells and/or ethos.

We're very religion light (good vs evil, rather than specifics) always have been.

Example, Pete (one of my regular players) likes a good Paladin- but that's just because he gets to be a stat heavy, armour wearing, sword-wielding, shouty (self-righteous) thug- with a heart of gold. In the game I'm writing up atm here on ENWorld (ToD) three of the five PCs are ex-Dragon Cultists that have seen the Light of Lathander and are supposedly adherents, I doubt that any of the Players has read anything to do with the Lord of Light (including Lummins- who often describes himself as the High Priest of Lathander, or THE Lord of Light), they've improvised once or twice.

Note, Pete played Ray the Zealot in ToD (a Paladin of Lathander) he was killed by Kobolds, boy was everyone glad to see the back of him.

Odd, maybe, I'm not sure- I'm more interested in the geography, history, flora and fauna et al; I may read some of the sourcebooks for detail, as and when, but I think I'm more interested in the FR modules/sourcebooks for the lay (and the play) of the land.

Thanks again, its very definitely good to talk, always a pleasure sir, and your knowledge of this land is to be admired, and then stolen and passed off as my own...

Cheers Goonalan
 


Iry

Adventurer
Except for a few big league characters, Harper is basically just a substitute for "Random Adventurer."
Why is this person here? Don't have the word count for a proper background? Harper.
1-2 Main Characters. 1-2 Joke Characters. Some Harpers.
 

Goonalan

Adventurer
Supporter
#056 Crypt of the Shadowking by Mark Anthony (Harpers 6)
Read 5/3/20 to 7/3/20


Forgotten Realms Crypt of the Shadow King (Harpers 6) a.JPG

Book 6- and this series is really starting to swing by, I'm having a great time... this one was another to be admired, nothing flashy just a nice idea, some twisty turny stuff- that's easy to spot (so very satisfying) and a genuinely well told tale. I liked it a lot.

It helped that the writing was good, not stop the world I want to get off- but simply put, well crafted and it just got on with it. It also helped that it read like an adventure, a hardback- to save Iriaebor, the City of a Thousand Spires, from the grasping Zhentarim- or so you'd think, but what's the novel called again.

The Shadowking, when he shows himself is more than worthy of the climax, as is his final resting place- a suitable locale for the grand showdown, in my mind I could see the film playing out.

So, the action's mostly in Iriaebor, which comes over (during the dark times depicted) as some rat-infested city corrupt at the heart, similar to those featured in a variety of WFRP campaigns. There's also a side-trek in here to the final resting place of a long lost bard, in the Fields of the Dead- there's some nice details that I'm going to steal from both locations for my own Realmsian wanderings (or else the wanderings of my players).

Also to admire is the adventuring party, the good guys- Caledan the world weary, cynical (I hate the Harpers) Bard/Ranger (?) the central figure for this campaign- I like that he's a little older, a bit (a lot) of a curmudgeon and a shoe-in for a (younger) Harrison Ford. Then there's Mari, the Harper with a secret (there are lots of secrets here), who of course hates/strongly dislikes Caledan for a good while- a sure sign of romance. Then there's Estah, the Halfling healer, and keeper of the folksy wisdom. But best of all are the remaining trio- Morhion the Wizard, cold (heartless?) and a serial betrayer of his friends, he's a character I have encountered many times before at my gaming table. What is it with folk that play mages, they always think (know) they're so much smarter than all of the other players. Then comes Tyveris, ex-Fighter-turned-Monk and adherent of Oghma, too cool for school this guy, certainly more so than the emoting Caledan.

And then, the real hero- the man that pulls no punches, takes more lives (in pursuit of the next bit of the adventure), who knows more secrets and dodgy folk, and in the end (Noooooooooooooooooooooooo ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo!) gives his life so his friends can live- Ferret. I swear I cried, I don't want to live in a world without Ferret.

The good guys are the A Team.

Team Bad Folk has a few big hitters too, Ravendas- the sister (and killer) of Caledan's former lover, and as it turns out SPOILERS mother of Caledan's child. She's a wicked witch alright, and a suitably vamped femme fatale. Snake is Ravendas' right-hand man, almost right up until the end- the affected Rogue also commands (for a while) an ancient immortal (well, not quite) shadow-killer.

The bad guys are a touch Disney, but bolder towards the finale.

The rest is the story, which pretty much visits all the usual places, but it fair swings by- and makes you smile at times, of course there are clumsy moments- and some stuff so obvious as to provoke more than the odd sigh, but that's okay.

This is fantasy fiction, not Dostoevsky and a way to live the rest of your life, it ticks boxes- left and right, I'd recommend it to my friends, and I would definitely DM the adventure.

Read.
 

Alzrius

The EN World kitten
I mostly remember this book for how it made for yet another ancient evil from the dawn of Creation. By that point, that particular archetypal niche was starting to get crowded. We already had Shar, the goddess of loss and nihilism whose split with her sister Selune is part of the Realms' creation story. We had elder evils like Dendar the Night Serpent and Kezef the Chaos Hound. Now we also had the shadevari. Tying them all together in the sourcebooks would be a chore, and I don't think there were too many more of these guys after that (and, to my knowledge, we don't see the shadevari again until this novel's sequel, Curse of the Shadowmage, after which point they're near-totally forgotten).

Beyond that, I don't recall much about the book. The character who made the strongest impression on me was Ravendas, but I seem to recall that her short story in Realms of Infamy was more impressive. Here, she was largely notable for how (from what I remember) she came across as crazy but charismatic, like a female version of Cobra Commander. Oh, and the wizard who made that pact with that shadowy ghost-figure; that sort of "being treated as a pariah for doing something necessary to save everyone, and letting everyone think the worst about you for it" bit seemed cool to me before. Now, it just seems overwrought; I can't remember if there was a reason he couldn't just explain to Caledan why he did what he did, but if not then he really should have done so. Drama tends to work better when it's driven by more than just a years-long fit of pique.
 
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Goonalan

Adventurer
Supporter
#057 Soldiers of Ice by David Cook (Harpers 7)
Read 7/3/20 to 8/3/20


Forgotten Realms Soldiers of Ice (Harpers 7) a.JPG

Book 7- and that was quick, truth be told I couldn't put it down- I finished the last book early yesterday morning (7.30 AM), went out to do my chores- got back 2 PM and picked up this little guy- 120 pages in by 4 PM. Got back around to it at about 11.30 PM and saw it to the end (just short of the 3 AM). It's a little cracker.

The neophyte Harper (Martine) is sent to close a rift to the para-elemental plane of ice (all in a days work), she meets Vil (Ex-Paladin of Torm, he's lost his religion and gone native) and the Vani (bunch of Gnomes- everything you need to GM a lair of these little bad boys). She impresses neither (much). So, Martine, without help, heads on to the rift- she messes up (although she closes the rift)- or else the big bad guy is already on the scene (and now he can't go home). Vreesar, the self-proclaimed Prince of (Evil) Ice (Cream? Dance? -Ice-Baby?) is from this moment on after our heroine (or else the magic stone she's carrying which seals the rift).

Martine flees the scene, all the while telling tall-tales (everything is going great!) to her scrying Harper mentor (Jazrac, Wizard ninny). Soon after the Harper Ranger is captured by Gnolls, swiftly married to Hakk the Chief (nice work) and then quizzed (and later kept alive) by Krote (Shaman/Word-Maker Gnoll, best character in the book, although Vil's good too).

Then it's chase-capture-escape-chase-capture-escape time, or else something very similar. Vreesar turns up, slaughters Hakk (Gnoll Chief) and makes himself head-honcho. The Vani (Gnomes) are chief suspects for closing the rift- Vreesar wants it open again, if only to invite more of his para-elemental brothers to the party.

Martine escapes, with help (sorta), and then the chase really gets going.

There are lots of good combat sequences, Vreesar really packs a punch, Vil goes superhero and the Vani turn out to be made of the right-stuff, particularly Jouka in Badger-slayer gimp-suit. Jazrac (Harper Wizard ninny/Mentor) turns up, as it transpires the mage is yeller, although later (somehow) he turns in to a superfly war wizard.

So, there's a bit of that- some things, off-screen, seem to happen/change/multiply overnight. To begin with there are a dozen to twenty Gnolls, by the time we get to the end three times as many have already been accounted for- that's odd, but I guess Vreesar's been recruiting. Jazrac has no offensive spells, next stop- Fireballs, Thunderwaves and Magic Missiles (or similar). There's a few of these moments, when things don't quite add up.

But, it's well written- we don't spend a warbling age inside the mind (and emotional rag-bag) of anyone in particular, Martine frets- later she gets the bit between her teeth and turns all Sgt-Major, but I like that- she's a tough (strong) lady. Vil, the other half of the love interest (did you guess), likewise does a little light soul-searching, but mostly just gets on with it (falling in love, turning back into a Paladin). It's all very neat, nothing much unexpected but it sails by, and like I say... I was pretty much gripped from start to finish.

Nice cliff-hanger chapter endings, much more noticeable here (a common occurrence in this sort of literature after all) but I would keep on telling myself- just finish this chapter and I'll go and peel the spuds, make tea, or bloody-hell-I'm-knackered- I'll go to bed. But I couldn't, I just kept on having to find out what happened next...

Really liked it, and there's also lots here to take away.

SPOILER- Vil gets killed, and I liked it all the more for it.

SPOILER- Krote pals up with Martine in the epilogue- they wander off into the sunset, and I liked it all the more for it.

Read.
 

Mythological Figures & Maleficent Monsters

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