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Is there life on Maaaaaaars! (er, Venus)

Moon_Goddess

Adventurer
Supporter
I read an article about how Venus was likely much more habitable till it's orbit got messed with by Jupiter swinging in and out. And how if there is life in the clouds, it could be the last dying examples of a once larger ecosystem.

That got me thinking. Say we find life there, and we find it's life not of earth origin, (different chemistry for dna maybe) but we find it is threatened, not by us, but by natural processes and say another 1000 years venus would be a dead world. Do we help it?
 

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Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
That got me thinking. Say we find life there, and we find it's life not of earth origin, (different chemistry for dna maybe) but we find it is threatened, not by us, but by natural processes and say another 1000 years venus would be a dead world. Do we help it?

The ethical question is rather moot, in that right now we lack the resources and technology to support such a program, nor do we have the scientific understanding of Venus' processes to be of any help.
 

ART!

Adventurer
I read an article about how Venus was likely much more habitable till it's orbit got messed with by Jupiter swinging in and out. And how if there is life in the clouds, it could be the last dying examples of a once larger ecosystem.

That got me thinking. Say we find life there, and we find it's life not of earth origin, (different chemistry for dna maybe) but we find it is threatened, not by us, but by natural processes and say another 1000 years venus would be a dead world. Do we help it?

...and by trying to help it, wind up ruining it?

I'm serious, joking, and sad as I type this.
 

Nikosandros

Golden Procrastinator
One thing that it important to consider is that the presence of phosphine is yet to be confirmed. A certain rotational transition has been observed and it is compatible with phosphine , but in order to confirm we need other measurements.
 



Janx

Hero
The ethical question is rather moot, in that right now we lack the resources and technology to support such a program, nor do we have the scientific understanding of Venus' processes to be of any help.
Except that as noted by arguments about going to Mars to stave off a catastrophe on Earth would foster tech advancements.

Big goals lead to big advancements.

Heck, I think you floated that concept back then.

Same thing here. If we set our hearts and minds to saving a planet's lifeforms. Maybe we could.

Granted, we don't have a good track record of getting those aforementioned hearts and minds into the right place.

That'd be the real roadblock. Not that we don't have the technology now.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
Except that as noted by arguments about going to Mars to stave off a catastrophe on Earth would foster tech advancements.

Big goals lead to big advancements.

Heck, I think you floated that concept back then.

Yep. But then, I recognize the difference between apples and oranges - Mars and Venus are completely different environments. And building a colony on the surface of Mars is not comparable to trying to enact ecological change on Venus.

Same thing here. If we set our hearts and minds to saving a planet's lifeforms. Maybe we could.

"Maybe we could," is too open ended. Maybe we could get to the galactic core, too.

Given how we seem unable to manage something so simple as our own carbon emissions? I am dubious about changing ecological conditions on Venus is within our grasp for the next few centuries.
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
Yeah. If we somehow become able to basically terraform planets, its much easier to do it here. There’s plenty of inhospitable bits of Earth even without taking climate change into account.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
One thing that it important to consider is that the presence of phosphine is yet to be confirmed. A certain rotational transition has been observed and it is compatible with phosphine , but in order to confirm we need other measurements.
For some reason, I just had this mental image of hotboxing Venusians getting mad at one of their buddies for venting the phosphine where the humans could detect it...

”DUUUUUUDE! You want them to come here and harsh our vibe?”
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
The way that our species is if we do actually find life on Venus, some group of us will just kill it on spec.
Between xenophobes, trophy hunters and ugly tourists? Yeah, they’re toast.

Especially the ugly tourists.

”Do not touch the Grishnak, earthlings.”

”You mean this thing?” poke poke

“AAAARRRGH!”
 

Khelon Testudo

Cleric of Stronmaus
Right now we have no capacity to rescue it. But we could conceivably preserve it, create a sample biome and keep some alive here on earth. But would we? Cui bono?
 

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