D&D 5E Magic Items, Gold, and 5e!

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
Supporter
If Wishes Were Gold, then Dead Bards Would be Fort Knox

So I've been thinking about how it's more common for people to use Wish as a meta spell to cast other spells than to, you know, WISH ... along with all the different comments people have made about the lack of utility of gold in 5e, and I thought that there might be a commonality on these issues that I had previously missed.

And if there isn't a commonality, I'm gonna create one! That's my superpower! To paraphrase the single best example of that Bard in your campaign, Air Supply....

I know how to make different things seem the same
I know all the rules and then I know how to break 'em
And that D&D is the name of the game
But I don't know how to stop these bad jokes
And I'll always be a know-it-all
And I can't stop myself from doing it...

Making meaning ....out of nothing at all
Out of nothing at all, out of nothing at all
Out of nothing at all, out of nothing at all
Out of nothing at all
Making meaning ... out of nothing at all


So I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that the issues people have with this is related to the concept of the paradox of choice - the idea that an abundance of choice is not necessarily a good thing, and can cause anxiety and unhappiness and, on occasion, paralysis in terms of decision-making. (Okay, this concept is actually more nuanced than the popular version that's been presented, but it's close enough for horseshoes, hand grenades, and my essays).

A long time ago, in a D&D edition far, far away, I ran a campaign where I gave the party a "deus ex machina" magical item. Essentially, it was a "get out of jail free" card that could be used one time, and only one time, as kind of an unlimited-powered wish as a failsafe for the party. You may already know where this is going. The party had encounters. Characters died. There were numerous opportunities to "use" the magic item that would have saved the party untold suffering and grief.

But they didn't. Afterwards, the players told me that while it was a cool campaign and idea, they absolutely HATED having that one use magic item, because they always thought there might be a better use for it .... and then they felt robbed because they never used it! They would have preferred to not have it, and not stress about the perfect use of it!

Which is similar to how I always felt about wishes. ESPECIALLY in 1e. I mean, sure, it was nice to have the whole "use a wish to raise a score one point up to 16" rule that was fairly common. But other than that specific example .... the sheer limitlessness of the power in so many ways (except those ways, like ability scores, in which it was limited) made them nearly unusable - at least, for me. Even putting aside the caveat that powerful wishes tended to bring out sadistic DM interpretations, the nearly-unlimited scope of the wish made it less likely that I would use it. Which is why I think later editions specified more particular uses for the wish- after all, it's easier to select from a menu of choices, that to be told you can have anything you want.

I mention this because I was thinking about the different threads on gold and its uses (or lack thereof) in 5e. More often than not, there is a discussion (and/or argument) between those who want more detailed rules for spending gold, and those who argue that gold has so many uses you don't need more rules. Even with publication of more material (such as Tasha's) there simply doesn't seem to be enough uses under the rules to soak up all the gold in a standard D&D campaign- which is why you'll see suggestion for moving to a silver standard (for example).

Personally, I tend to fall in the camp of not needing rules for gold, as my campaigns always have uses for gold. This is most likely because I am used to campaigns that spend gold on things other than magic items, and I have rules and heuristics for doing so, and my players usually have well-defined goals for their PCs that involve the use of gold. And maybe the reason I have these heuristics is because I started playing long ago, when there were rules and goals ... for using gold!

But I'm putting it out there for general discussion. Is spending gold in your campaigns a big issue? Do you think that the best solution is to reduce the amount of gold (either by reducing the amount, raising prices, or move to a silver standard), or to have additional rules for spending gold that go beyond what we've already seen? Is the additional material we've seen so far sufficient, or insufficient, for the gold problem in your campaign?
 
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Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
Supporter
I always want to build a stronghold and hire minions, so I never run out of uses for gold (more minions!), but that might be because I started playing back under AD&D 1st edition, where that was a major assumption of what you'd do with gold.

Same! As a player, I am constantly coming up with ideas to spend the gold- towers, keeps, wards, or crazy stuff in general.

When in doubt, why not an army?

But I do think it's that baleful 1e influence .... ;)
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen (She/Her/Hers)
Well first of all, I think the issue with your one-use super-wish was not analysis paralysis but the classic healing potion problem. In RPGs, players are often hesitant to use consumable items for fear that they might not have them at some hypothetical point in the future where they need them more, and end up not spending them at all. This is a very common phenomenon, but I don’t think it’s what’s going on with gold in 5e. I’ve never heard a player complain that they don’t want to spend their gold because what if there’s something better to spend it on later. What I do hear players complaining about is having so much gold and nothing to spend it on.

Now, to some, the idea that there’s nothing to spend gold on seems like complete nonsense. Of course there’s stuff to spend your gold on! Strongholds, mage towers, hirelings, boats, a spyglass… How could anyone feel like there isn’t anything to spend gold on when there are tables and tables of big-ticket items to do exactly that?

I think the real culprit is the shift in the game’s focus over time. As the game has moved away from troupe play in a shared sandbox and towards following the exploits of a particular group of characters, the things PCs used to spend their gold on has lost its value to most players. What do I care that my character owns a house if the gameplay entirely takes place away from that house? What use is a mage’s tower when I’m off on an adventure? And a boat is only useful if you’re specifically playing a nautical adventure, and if you are, you’ll get a boat anyway because otherwise the adventure can’t happen.

This is also why no one pays any attention to the rules for Lifestyle Expenses. Who cares if I’m theoretically living an aristocratic life style? When the actual game is happening, I’m gonna be eating canned rations and sleeping on a bedroll in some haunted forest anyway.

Hirelings can at least be useful on an adventure, but… They also take up mental bandwidth on managing them in combat, table time executing their turns, and spotlight time while exploring and socializing - or if they don’t, they’re boring and get forgotten about. Not worth it.

So what does that leave to spend gold on after you’ve all chipped in to buy your party tank a set of full plate armor? Some ridiculously expensive poisons that will be useful for exactly one attack? Potions that I’ll just end up saving for some hypothetical future time when I’ll need them more? (Ooooooohhh, there’s the Wish connection!) No. All this gold feels useless despite the game giving you plenty of things to spend it on, because none of those things are useful in the game as it’s typically played nowadays.

So, what’s the solution? Let players buy magic weapons and armor. Seriously, that’s the only thing that’s going to be valuable enough to the folks who finds gold useless for them to want to spend it on.
 


payn

I don't believe in the no-win scenario
What do I care that my character owns a house if the gameplay entirely takes place away from that house? What use is a mage’s tower when I’m off on an adventure? And a boat is only useful if you’re specifically playing a nautical adventure, and if you are, you’ll get a boat anyway because otherwise the adventure can’t happen.
This. The players only needed gold in the past for XP and magic items. Folks have become accustomed to needing to collect gold to open new levels of crap for their characters. It's not a problem if you just get back to adventuring and forget about it.
So, what’s the solution? Let players buy magic weapons and armor. Seriously, that’s the only thing that’s going to be valuable enough to the folks who finds gold useless for them to want to spend it on.
Who really wants to go back to that?
 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
Supporter
So, what’s the solution? Let players buy magic weapons and armor. Seriously, that’s the only thing that’s going to be valuable enough to the folks who finds gold useless for them to want to spend it on.

See, I'm going to disagree with that last bit. That's an option, but not necessarily the option.

Just like OD&D / 1e people all have the kneejerk, "There's plenty of things to spend money on," I think that there's a 3e style which is always, "Sure, and those plenty of things are ... MAGIC ITEMS!"

Not that there's anything wrong with that, but ... well, there is. :)

(In my opinion ... obviously, others can shop smart, shop S-Mart.)
 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
Supporter
Gold can be used to hire assassins to kill Bards. And the world never runs out of Bards.

....just like I thought. Bards are like the mosquitoes of D&D, you can never be completely rid of 'em.*

Doesn't mean you shouldn't try!

*Also? They suck! Thank you! Don’t forget to tip your server…
 
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Mort

Legend
Supporter
In my campaigns, as the players get more gold, there always seem to be many more options to spend gold on. Whether it's magic items or land or building on the land - or expert craftsmen to build stuff for the party etc.

As for the wish problem? I don't think that's the same problem as with gold - it's as @Charlaquin said more the fear that sometime later the item/wish will be more useful. In a prior campaign I gave out a potion of giant strength (fire giant? can even remember at this point) at 2nd level. The campaign got to 8th, there were MANY situations where it would have helped greatly - yet it was never used.
 


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