More Tricks and Traps, Less Combat

Endur

Visitor
I'd like to see a greater emphasis for tricks and traps when exploring ancient tombs, and less combat.

AD&D put a lot of emphasis on tricks and traps (see the charts in the AD&D DMG, Tomb of Horrors, etc.).

Also, certain monster opponents such as Green Slime, Yellow Mold, have been around since AD&D but their family of monsters (molds, slimes, etc.) has not expanded as much as other monster families from AD&D (think of all the giants, humanoids, undead, we have now, but we still just have the basic slimes and molds).
 

Aloïsius

Visitor
I'd like to see a greater emphasis for tricks and traps when exploring ancient tombs, and less combat.
I would like to see less emphasis for exploring ancient tombs. :D


Also, certain monster opponents such as Green Slime, Yellow Mold, have been around since AD&D but their family of monsters (molds, slimes, etc.) has not expanded as much as other monster families from AD&D (think of all the giants, humanoids, undead, we have now, but we still just have the basic slimes and molds).
Well, I guess fighting the giant sorcerer who threatens to conquer the land and ask for child sacrifices to his dark god is somewhat more motivating than fighting a mindless purple pudding that ooze through some random corridor, looking for some organic material to digest.
Giants, humanoids and undead have motivations, they are dangerous adversaries. You can hate them, you can fear them, you can respect them or even befriend them. Slimes and molds, on the other hand...
 

Kynn

Adventurer
I'd like to see a greater emphasis for tricks and traps when exploring ancient tombs, and less combat.

AD&D put a lot of emphasis on tricks and traps (see the charts in the AD&D DMG, Tomb of Horrors, etc.).
Only if the entire party is going to have meaningful ways to interact with and in participate in dealing with those traps.

If it's all a case of the thief dealing with them (or the wizard/cleric with thief-obsoleting spells), then no, we don't need more of that.
 

Ahnehnois

Visitor
I think the 5e equivalent of Dungeonscape should be released pretty fast. A supplement for "old school" dungeon crawling is absolutely necessary.

But I don't support that approach for the core game. The Dungeon is to me an anachronistic concept that represents only a small part of the scope of what the game can be. I hardly ever use any kind of traps or puzzles, and when I do I find them silly and distracting.

I don't really believe that D&D needs to focus on tactical combat or miniatures, either, FWIW.
 

BobTheNob

Visitor
I do strongly agree with less combat. As the editions have progressed it seems to me like combat has become the reason for the game and I think Im ready for something else. I sincerely hope 5e has more "meat" outside of the combat arena than just "make a skill roll". Its becoming make or break for me for 5e.

Im not sure about more "traps and tricks". I think there is alot of design space for more than that, but if that is what takes your fancy more power to you.
 
I do strongly agree with less combat. As the editions have progressed it seems to me like combat has become the reason for the game and I think Im ready for something else. I sincerely hope 5e has more "meat" outside of the combat arena than just "make a skill roll". Its becoming make or break for me for 5e.
That has much to do with the departure of treasure = XP
Used to be you'd avoid combat and grab loot, which is why Thiefs weren't too bad as needing to be good in combat was a secondary worry.
 

DEFCON 1

Legend
AD&D put a lot of emphasis on tricks and traps (see the charts in the AD&D DMG, Tomb of Horrors, etc.).
But don't forget... the reason why AD&D did was because at the time the book was released, we as players were not so accustomed to them that their appearance was a big deal and a big shock. However, once the concept and execution of them became so commonplace, Dungeoneering Standard Operating Procedures became universally known among the gaming community. Once it no longer even needed to be said to the DM that the PC in front was tapping the floor in front of him with a 10' pole, and that every character had a personal supply of 100' rope, pitons, hammer, caltrops etc. etc... the 'magic' of tricks and traps was dampened, if not outright lost.

Players nowadays have seen or heard almost every form of dungeon trap known to man. 'Surprising' us with a trick or trap is exceedingly hard and rare.
 

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