D&D 5E Princes of the Apocalypse as source material

Purchase PotA purely as a game resource?

  • No

    Votes: 25 54.3%
  • Yes

    Votes: 21 45.7%

Savage Wombat

Adventurer
I liked the looks of PotA as an adventure, and I'd probably buy it IF I were going to run it. But I'm not, at least right now. And since these APs are supposed to be game support as well as campaigns ...

Would you (or have you already) purchase Princes of the Apocalypse if you have no intention of running it?
 

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Mercule

Adventurer
Nope. Not much there besides adventure material. About 75% of the "support" can be found in the free download.

Only a couple of new magic items that are suitable for other use. Ditto for monsters. You could probably adapt the others, but it still isn't worthwhile.

If you're running in the Realms, in that particular region, there's probably enough info to make it a consideration, but that's a pretty significant corner case and still a very dubious return.
 



DEFCON 1

Legend
Supporter
Haven't yet but probably will. Stuff like this I will always find a reason to pull stuff out of to use elsewhere if I don't run a game from it as-is.
 

77IM

Explorer!!!
Supporter
Several dungeons and side-treks can be lifted wholesale and transplanted directly into some other campaign. The haunted keeps in particular; replace some of the cultists' elemental spells with more generic stuff (or necromantic, or whatever) and nobody will even realize that, say, Rivergard Keep or Sacred Stone Monastery are part of Elemental Evil. The Temple levels can also be pulled out and used separately. You can even have them as isolated cults of fire-worshippers or whatever.
 


jamesjhaeck

Explorer
Several dungeons and side-treks can be lifted wholesale and transplanted directly into some other campaign. The haunted keeps in particular; replace some of the cultists' elemental spells with more generic stuff (or necromantic, or whatever) and nobody will even realize that, say, Rivergard Keep or Sacred Stone Monastery are part of Elemental Evil. The Temple levels can also be pulled out and used separately. You can even have them as isolated cults of fire-worshippers or whatever.
Seconding this. A lot of the dungeons (especially the surface-level Haunted Keeps) are evocative enough to be used as a standalone challenge.
 


vandaexpress

First Post
It depends on what you're looking for (I know, helpful, right).

I'm running Tyranny right now, and probably will for some time, so I don't get any immediate use out of it. However I bought it for a couple reasons:

1. I enjoy encounter design, so I like seeing what professionally designed encounters they have, and I *really* appreciate the monsters these adventures bring to the table, I use them as benchmarks for my own creations and they sometimes have cool traits or powers that I can repurpose. I like dissecting the encounter budgets and looking at all the underlying math.

2. I like to have stats for major players in the realms - although not technically realms, the elemental princes are big enough baddies that I don't mind having stats for them. This is particularly important to me until Wizards gets around to releasing an official conversion guide for older stats. (BTW... are there any good unofficial guides floating around here that you guys would recommend?) In particular, anything that approaches what used to be called "epic level" I like having stats for. I also enjoy seeing what level the NPCs are given their position or role within the world. For example, how powerful does one need to be to be an elemental prophet in the Realms? I sometimes have a hard time placing big time NPCs at the appropriate power level in 5e, especially when they were in prior editions. Bounded accuracy is throwing me off in that regard.

3. I want to show my support to WotC so that D&D can continue to grow. I'm fortunate to be in a position where I have enough discretionary income to do this, so the old adage "Vote with your money" applies here.

4. Any tidbit of information about the 5e Realms is of great interest to me, given the relative paucity of information about its current state. Any adventure that takes place there in 5e gets points because of this.

Having said that, what others have said is essentially true - unless you're a diehard D&D fan, I'm not sure its worth it strictly as source material unless your interests are along the same lines as mine, in that you enjoy seeing how professional game designers apply the rules to creating monsters, encounters, and skill checks, knowing that these specific interpretation and applications of those concepts has been approved by WotC.

If you don't plan to run it and don't have an interest in that stuff, pick up the player's companion for free and you should be in good shape.
 

Agamon

Adventurer
I've hacked parts and pieces of published stuff for use in my own games for years. As a sandbox adventure, this sure fits the bill as easy to drag and drop. So, yes, recommended both for use in full, or for use in pieces.
 

HobbitFan

Explorer
I like the adventure. I'm running it right now for my Monday D&D group.
Despite that, I wouldn't recommend it be picked up to loot for ideas, etc.
If you're not running the campaign, there's not enough reusable stuff or additional material to justify purchasing it to loot for ideas.
 

BoldItalic

First Post
I've bought it, and I'm running it, but chopping it about to suit the players because they like to sandbox. For example, I transplanted a lot of the early stuff that's written for Red Larch to Beliard instead and reflavoured it to link into the PC's backstories, which transferred over from LMoP. I'm ignoring anything faction-related, because the players are not faction-joining type people. Things like that. The whole thing is malleable.
 

Cadriel

First Post
I am running it as well, and I think it would be useful but maybe not $50 useful. Maybe for the Amazon price. There is a detailed town, a small regional gazetteer, the main adventure path (the water and earth keeps are solid locations and would stand alone very well), a lot of mini-adventures as side treks, 32 pages of monsters and NPCs, and four pages of magic items that aren't in the Player's Companion.

I certainly would rank it over the Tyranny of Dragons material as far as an adventure path that could be mined for ideas. If you wanted, you could strip out the Elemental Evil plot and run Trouble in Red Larch as an introduction to a totally different campaign.
 

fewilcox

First Post
Nope. Not much there besides adventure material. About 75% of the "support" can be found in the free download.

Only a couple of new magic items that are suitable for other use. Ditto for monsters. You could probably adapt the others, but it still isn't worthwhile.

If you're running in the Realms, in that particular region, there's probably enough info to make it a consideration, but that's a pretty significant corner case and still a very dubious return.
That's definitely one of those books that I wouldn't purchase unless I had every intention of making full use of it. GURPS world books are frequently purchased by players of other systems, even some who hate GURPS, simply because they have a reputation of being very well researched and written and have little crunch. These books, on the other hand, are focused fairly tightly on the railroad and not so much on the scenery, and that makes them pretty useless unless you plan to run the actual adventure. I was lent a copy of Hoard of the Dragon Queen to run last season, but I have no interest in actually owning a copy since I'll never run it again.

No. Published dungeon crawls aren't worth my time to read--my sandbox diverges too much from the base assumptions. Easier to just invent stuff.
There is that, too. For my very first campaign (GURPS) a decade ago I did hours of prep, trying to guess everything the players might do and account for it. When game time came they ignored 90% of what I prepared and forced me to improvise most of the session. Since then the only prep I've done is pre-creating monsters and coming up with a couple of very vague outlines of evil plots they could get entangled with. The rest I make up during the session. On both sides of the screen I find modules frustrating and actively encouraged my Encounters players to diverge from it if so inclined.

The only exception is my steam-punkified Warehouse 13/23-inspired GURPS campaign. For it PCs are sent out on specific recovery missions and that has so far enabled us to have adventures that could have actually taken place in the real world (less so now that I'm adding more steam stuff and thus diverging from history). Since part of the PCs' job is to suppress knowledge of artifacts, only the few people affected by each one are aware of it, so the events surrounding them are forgotten by everyone outside of the Warehouse, meaning they may have really happened but no one remembers them. That may be my favorite campaign ever, probably in part because of the total lack of combat. I actually have some suitable pre-gens and my research around one of the previously-recovered artifacts on hand in case anyone ever wants a GURPS demo.
 

Herobizkit

Adventurer
I voted 'no'. There is far too much material "floating" around in my own library and elsewhere that I wouldn't need PotA as yet another resource, even if it is 5e.
 



Rod Staffwand

aka Ermlaspur Flormbator
Nope. I don't need to pay for ideas--I've got tons of my own and a limitless supply from older games, TV shows, movies, books, comics, and the world around us.

The same goes for encounters, dungeons, NPCs, monsters, magic items, etc. Really, the only thing from PotA I'm vaguely interested in they gave away for free. Thanks, Wizards!
 

Rhenny

Adventurer
I bought it not knowing if or when I'd run it. It just so happens that I will start a new campaign using it next week. I was pretty sure I'd use it in part or whole.
 

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