log in or register to remove this ad

 

TSR Q&A with Gary Gygax

Status
Not open for further replies.
This is the multi-year Q&A sessions held by D&D co-creator Gary Gygax here at EN World, beginning in 2002 and running up until his sad pasing in 2008. Gary's username in the thread below is Col_Pladoh, and his first post in this long thread is Post #39.

Gary_Gygax_Gen_Con_2007.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Comments

Status
Not open for further replies.

Col_Pladoh

Gary Gygax
BOZ said:
caltrops, yay! :)
Spiked armor...bah!

Actually, the Romans did actually use spiked armor when fighting the Carthiginians at Zama. They armed light footmen with axes, clad them in spiked armor, so that the elephants they were to hamstring would not use theit trunks to grab them. This battle is as well the only one I know of in which the Romans used chariots as a war weapon, having lancers in them to attack the enemy elephants.

Cheers,
Gary
 

log in or register to remove this ad

So, what I'm seeing there, is that spikey armor is a historical evolution to combat larger-than-average foes that have a tendency to pick up human-sized foes? :)

I never knew that - but it's an interesting bit of ammo to have the next time someone complains about "dungeonpunk." :D

Thanks for that - and for your answer to my earlier question, Gary!
 

Col_Pladoh

Gary Gygax
Patryn of Elvenshae said:
So, what I'm seeing there, is that spikey armor is a historical evolution to combat larger-than-average foes that have a tendency to pick up human-sized foes? :)

I never knew that - but it's an interesting bit of ammo to have the next time someone complains about "dungeonpunk." :D

Thanks for that - and for your answer to my earlier question, Gary!
Not quite!

Many a force fought elephants and spiked armor was not employed. The gates of Indian fortresses were spiked to prevent elephants from pushing them down, but no spiked armor.

Maybe picked, trained soldiers in a disciplined Roman army could get away with being clad in spiked armor, but elsewhere it is a hazard to wearer and friend alike, especially in any close-quarters environment such as a dungeon. Worse still would be in a wooden building or a forest.

In my considered opinion, spiked armor is the worst sort of dungeonpunk, worse that multi-buckled designer leather costuming passing for armor :lol:

Cheers,
Gary
 
Last edited:

oldschooler

First Post
Zudrak said:
From the 1st edition PHB, p.8:
"Rules not understood should have appropriate questions directed to the publisher; disputes with the Dungeon Master are another matter entirely. THE REFEREE IS THE FINAL ARBITER OF ALL AFFAIRS OF HIS OR HER CAMPAIGN."

That should have been repeated verbatim in 3.Xe. Too many players have become rules lawyers and want to quote books at the table rather than roleplay -- when it's a roleplaying game to begin with. If someone wants to quote books all day, they should join a Shakespearean fan club. There has been a shift of power at the gaming table that could have been avoided by keeping those two above sentences in the PHB. DM's have to do a lot and becoming targets for player abuse (both in the game and of the game) should not be one of the challenges.
AMEN!
 

Col_Pladoh

Gary Gygax
A heads up:

Harold Johnson is having a memorial gathering at 6 PM (it has just begun) for Dave Sutherland at the Cactus Club here in Lake Geneva--the same place where one was held in memory of Dave Dimery who was in charge of TSR's advertising during the heyday of the company.

Anyway, do whatever you think appropriate in Dave Sutherland's memory. I am heading there in a couple of minutes :(

Salut!
Gary
 

Geoffrey

First Post
Gary, I remember you saying that while you greatly enjoyed playing Metamorphosis Alpha, you felt that Gamma World was somehow lacking. I played 1st edition Gamma World quite a bit back in the early 1980s, but I never played Metamorphosis Alpha (though I own it and have perused it). After comparing the two games, it seems that they are virtually the same except that MA is set in a starship and GW is set on planet Earth.

What is it about Gamma World that you find lacking as compared to Metamorphosis Alpha?
 

Gentlegamer

First Post
Col_Pladoh said:
A heads up:

Harold Johnson is having a memorial gathering at 6 PM (it has just begun) for Dave Sutherland at the Cactus Club here in Lake Geneva--the same place where one was held in memory of Dave Dimery who was in charge of TSR's advertising during the heyday of the company.

Anyway, do whatever you think appropriate in Dave Sutherland's memory. I am heading there in a couple of minutes :(

Salut!
Gary
Dave Sutherland has gone home . . .
 


Aelryinth

Explorer
Mr Gygax, a little history help if you will...

The rakshasa in the original Monster Manual can be killed instantly by a shot from a blessed crossbow bolt. Assuming this is based on historical Indian mythology, where did you find this weakness? It seems the original Ramayana story line has Rama using an arrow or spear to kill Ravenna, and I know someone who is interested in hearing where you got this particular weakness with crossbows from.

Thank you!

==+Aelryinth
 

MPA

First Post
Aelryinth said:
Mr Gygax, a little history help if you will...

The rakshasa in the original Monster Manual can be killed instantly by a shot from a blessed crossbow bolt. Assuming this is based on historical Indian mythology, where did you find this weakness? It seems the original Ramayana story line has Rama using an arrow or spear to kill Ravenna, and I know someone who is interested in hearing where you got this particular weakness with crossbows from.

Thank you!

==+Aelryinth
He answered something along that line sometime ago. The rakshasa was created from a monster in a TV show, and his weakness came from his head alone.
 

Col_Pladoh

Gary Gygax
Geoffrey said:
Gary, I remember you saying that while you greatly enjoyed playing Metamorphosis Alpha, you felt that Gamma World was somehow lacking. I played 1st edition Gamma World quite a bit back in the early 1980s, but I never played Metamorphosis Alpha (though I own it and have perused it). After comparing the two games, it seems that they are virtually the same except that MA is set in a starship and GW is set on planet Earth.

What is it about Gamma World that you find lacking as compared to Metamorphosis Alpha?
Actually, the rules are different, but so are the latest rules for the MA game.

The "soul" of MA did not translate into the GW game, and the settings are quite different, so that affects overall play.

I must add that I contributed to the GW game, all of the riding beasts therein being of my invention, as is one of the tables of random finds.

About the best I can suggest is for you to actually play MA with an experienced GM...

Cheers,
Gary
 

Col_Pladoh

Gary Gygax
Gentlegamer said:
Dave Sutherland has gone home . . .
Amen, Brother.

The gathering was quite large, saw a number of people U hadn't talked to in years, and it is likely that a perpetual scholarship fund for an art student will come out of it. Dave would be very pleased :)

Cheers,
Gary
 


Col_Pladoh

Gary Gygax
Aelryinth said:
Mr Gygax, a little history help if you will...

The rakshasa in the original Monster Manual can be killed instantly by a shot from a blessed crossbow bolt. Assuming this is based on historical Indian mythology, where did you find this weakness? It seems the original Ramayana story line has Rama using an arrow or spear to kill Ravenna, and I know someone who is interested in hearing where you got this particular weakness with crossbows from.

Thank you!

==+Aelryinth
Heh...

That was covered earlier, here I think, although it might have been on another board. No Matter.

I was a fan of Kolchack, the Night Stalker, when it first aired, and sure enough they had a rakshasa as a monstrous evil on that show. I liked the idea of the demon being destroyed by a blessed wooden crossbow bolt, that being akin to the stake through a vampire's heart, so I went with that in the MM.

Nowadays I'd be less prone to allowing so easy an answer to the threat of a rakshasa, although not many adventuring parties are equipped with a crossbow and blessed bolts.

Cheers,
Gary
 

scadgrad

First Post
Col_Pladoh said:
Heh...

That was covered earlier, here I think, although it might have been on another board. No Matter.

I was a fan of Kolchack, the Night Stalker, when it first aired, and sure enough they had a rakshasa as a monstrous evil on that show. I liked the idea of the demon being destroyed by a blessed wooden crossbow bolt, that being akin to the stake through a vampire's heart, so I went with that in the MM.

Nowadays I'd be less prone to allowing so easy an answer to the threat of a rakshasa, although not many adventuring parties are equipped with a crossbow and blessed bolts.

Cheers,
Gary
Gary,

Wow, yet another Night Stalker fan. Man I remember that being one of the only shows that actually frightned me as a kid. I thought the Rakshasa and the Doppleganger episodes were both truly frightening. Of course, were I to see them today, I'd probably not think so much of them; the lens of nostlagia and all that.

Care to comment on how Castle Zagyg is progressing at this point?
 

SpiderMonkey

Explorer
This isn't so much a question or a game-related comment as much as it is an opportunity to say thank you, Gary. I picked D&D up when I was younger, and it opened up a lot of doors for me, particularly with reading and history. I'm now studying English Pedagogy at the Masters level, and I suspect that if it weren't for D&D, I might not have gotten interested in reading and writing at all. I still play whenever possible, and it has probably been one of the more defining aspects of my life for the past 18 years. So thank you, for that and for things like this thread; it's an unusual and welcome gesture from an industry personality of any sort, let alone the progenitor of an entire genre!

So...er...how 'bout 'dem Packers? :p
 

Col_Pladoh

Gary Gygax
scadgrad said:
Gary,

Wow, yet another Night Stalker fan. Man I remember that being one of the only shows that actually frightned me as a kid. I thought the Rakshasa and the Doppleganger episodes were both truly frightening. Of course, were I to see them today, I'd probably not think so much of them; the lens of nostlagia and all that.

Care to comment on how Castle Zagyg is progressing at this point?
As a lad I was terrified by the events depicted in She, the Return of Frankenstein, and the old Ghost of Dracula films--that I snuck away to see. When I walked home on a winter's night after seeing The Thing, I was keeping well away from the darkly shadowed bushes along my route :heh:

As for the CZ project, the Yggsburgh maps are all done, and the Trolls plan to have it for a GenCon release. I have not been sufficiently well to work the long hours necessary to do the castle and dungeon levels, though. that project will demand long daily hours of intense concentration that I am not yet up to managing.

Cheers,
Gary
 

Col_Pladoh

Gary Gygax
SpiderMonkey said:
This isn't so much a question or a game-related comment as much as it is an opportunity to say thank you, Gary. I picked D&D up when I was younger, and it opened up a lot of doors for me, particularly with reading and history. I'm now studying English Pedagogy at the Masters level, and I suspect that if it weren't for D&D, I might not have gotten interested in reading and writing at all. I still play whenever possible, and it has probably been one of the more defining aspects of my life for the past 18 years. So thank you, for that and for things like this thread; it's an unusual and welcome gesture from an industry personality of any sort, let alone the progenitor of an entire genre!

So...er...how 'bout 'dem Packers? :p
Your kind words are greatly appreciated. It is always heartening to learn how my work aided someone in focusing their potential ;)

As someone born in Chicago, I am a Bears fan first and foremost, and I recall their glory days in the 1940. We lived near Wrigley field where they played then... I have a guilty secret, though:uhoh: I have watched and rooted for the Packers since Bart Starr was the QB, and if the Bears can't make the playoffs, than I am 100% behind the Pack. I am wondering who they can get to step into Favre's shoes, although he might have another few good seasons, he is getting old for a football player.

BTW, having been in Bear's regalia at a Bear-Packer game at Lambeau Field, I was impressed with the general goodwill of the Packer fans after their team really spanked the Bears :eek:

Cheerio,
Gary
 

Orius

Adventurer
Col_Pladoh said:
My manner of operating TSR differed radicaly frm that of the Blume brothers who took over management of the company and ran it into the ground. Then Lorraine Williams directed things so that it was, to the best of my knowledge, at least over $30 million in debt when WotC acquired TSR. I do believe that the method of doing business by Wizards is not one that best serves the D&D game audience or the game itself, but time will tell.
Well, I'm no expert on the marketing of RPG by any stretch of the imagination, but from reading the bits on the background of the various D&D settings that was presented in Dragon 315, I got the impression that TSR spent a great deal of time during the 2e era trying to come up with the next Dragonlance. According to the issue, the original Dragonlance modules and novels were unexpectedly a big hit, and it seems that TSR management wanted another big hit along the same lines. So there were a number of different campaign settings released, each with adventures, expansions, novels and so on. Several people who worked for TSR near the end who later went over to WotC have blamed TSR's bankrupcy on the fact that the different settings essentially fragmented the D&D player base by having too many diverse products but not enough players to support them.

I'm sure TSR's attempt to cash in on the collectable card game fad in the mid 90's with not 1 but 2 different games didn't help either. Their 1996 release schedule had something like two dozen or so splatbooks and adventures for core AD&D, maybe a half a dozen campaign settings each with at least 1 or 2 adventures/expansions/novels being published each month, whatever products (and I think there was at least 3 or 4 of them) they were releasing for Spellfire (TSR's big CCG), several expansion sets for Dragon Dice (their collectible dice game), and probably an assortment of other various products. And all this when they were supposedly having difficulty paying their bills on time.

And the silly decision to sue people who were putting up home brewed material on the web for copyright infringement was a rather boneheaded move that alienated a number of players that TSR couldn't affor to lose at the time.

As for WotC, I think a lot of people are suspiscious of them because of all the screw ups TSR made in their last few years. TSR was run by a bunch of suits who didn't know jack about the game industry and didn't really care what the average gamer thought, and a lot of people seem to think the same thing about WotC. There's also gamers who liked some of the settings that TSR cranked out, but that WotC decided to axe in favor of focusing support on the 2 big settings instead: Greyhawk and the Forgotten Realms, and some of them are still bitter. Another common gripe is that WotC doesn't bother to publish adventures. WotC was moving away from DM-only material there for a while, since such products have less potential buyers, and there's publishing costs for them to consider. However it seems they've changed their mind on that a little bit as I've read here on ENWorld that they're planning to produce some adventures again soon. WotC's revision of the 3e rules 2 years ago also created a great deal of suspicion that they're only interested in profiting off the game. But on the whole, I think they're doing a fair job with the game. I'd say their biggest problem is not doing enough to promote the game to new players.
 

Orius

Adventurer
Col_Pladoh said:
In my considered opinion, spiked armor is the worst sort of dungeonpunk, worse that multi-buckled designer leather costuming passing for armor :lol:
Well, I certainly agree with you there. I've never been a big fan of the spiked armor, heavy tattoos and body piercing, and excessive buckles that marked early 3e art. The mishmash armor that is shown on several characters that looked liked they were equipped with bits and pieces scavanged from a battlefield was also something that I dislike strongly as well.
 

Status
Not open for further replies.

Mythological Figures & Maleficent Monsters

Advertisement1

Latest threads

Mythological Figures & Maleficent Monsters

Advertisement2

Advertisement4

Top