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D&D General Should a low level character know to burn a troll?

Should a low level character know to burn a troll?

  • Yes

    Votes: 86 78.9%
  • No

    Votes: 23 21.1%

ad_hoc

(they/them)
Is there? Mass communication is a pretty modern thing. And even the Internet, the ultimate in mass communication, is plagued by pseudoscience and nonsense. Word of mouth would be far, far worse.

While true, I think, "kill it with fire" is just a general strategy for most scary situations.

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Guest 6801328

Guest
The problem with a simple “yes” answer is that it suggests that if the players don’t know, their characters still do. So, what, the DM should tell them?

Like I said previously, there is an option missing.
 

If you're assuming yes, its common knowledge that every character would know . . .

- Should the DM outright tell them how to stop the troll regenerating if it was a beginner game and none of the players knew?
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
If you're assuming yes, its common knowledge that every character would know . . .

- Should the DM outright tell them how to stop the troll regenerating if it was a beginner game and none of the players knew?

Do you as a DM give your players common information? Do you tell them what currency is worth, and who the king is?
 

Yardiff

Adventurer
Which monsters are considered 'common'? If your character grew up in an area where trolls were, at most, legend should your character know that a trolls regeneration is stopped by fire and acid?
 

Do you as a DM give your players common information? Do you tell them what currency is worth, and who the king is?
Yep.
I'm curious because some have strong memories of their 'first troll encounter' (or werewolf encounter, or similar). I'm interested whether they think that it would have been as fun if the DM just told them how to kill them, rather than the frantic bout of inter-party experimentation and improvisation that ensued.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen (She/Her/Hers)
If you're assuming yes, its common knowledge that every character would know . . .

- Should the DM outright tell them how to stop the troll regenerating if it was a beginner game and none of the players knew?
I wouldn’t say they should, necessarily, but I certainly wouldn’t say they shouldn’t. Personally, that’s the sort of information I would give to players with a relevant proficiency.
 

Doug McCrae

Legend
The characters in The Hobbit all seem to know what trolls are, and the reader is expected to as well.

"They were trolls. Obviously trolls. Even Bilbo, in spite of his sheltered life, could see that: from the great heavy faces of them, and their size, and the shape of their legs, not to mention their language, which was not drawing-room fashion at all, at all."​

"For trolls, as you probably know, must be underground before dawn, or they go back to the stuff of the mountains they are made of, and never move again."​

No one expresses surprise when they turn to stone.
 

Campbell

Relaxed Intensity
In a challenge oriented game having to pretend not to know something that you know sucks. If the game is not challenge oriented dramatic irony can be a fun thing to play around in, but I do not feel not setting fire to a troll is very compelling dramatic irony.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen (She/Her/Hers)
Yep.
I'm curious because some have strong memories of their 'first troll encounter' (or werewolf encounter, or similar). I'm interested whether they think that it would have been as fun if the DM just told them how to kill them, rather than the frantic bout of inter-party experimentation and improvisation that ensued.

That’s a fun experience, but is think it’s best reproduced by using custom monsters (so no players will actually know their weaknesses) that are not well-known in the setting (so no characters would be expected to know their weaknesses.) Trolls are pretty common monsters in most fantasy settings and their aversion to fire is pretty common knowledge in geek culture.
 

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