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D&D 5E Should I ask my DM to kill my D&D character?


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Stalker0

Legend
I would weaken him in a cool way. Maybe they lose an arm, for take a permanent wound.

maybe their personal weapon gets broken, and so he uses a weakened weapon.

no need for him to die, plenty of ways to weaken him without a kill
 

jgsugden

Legend
There is a wide range in effectiveness that PCs can have in combat. In 5E, it is really pretty hard to be so off the spectrum that it actually causes a problem. You may be the most powerful PC in the group, but that doesn't mean it is going to be a problem. If you enjoy it, stick with it.

That being said, if you'd have more fun if the PC was taken down a peg, work with the DM to do so. If your power comes from a magic item, that magic item might not need to stay in your hands.

If it comes from high stats, it usually is not actually a problem - I ran a game for a PC with average ability scores of 16 by level 12 and it never really got in the way.

If it comes form other sources, there could be curses or other negative challenges that offset your advantages. Heck, as a player, you can develop the PC in directions that give them offsetting disadvantages due to lines they will not cross.
 

Ancalagon

Dusty Dragon
This thread is kind of a big-time indictment of 5e--the fact that you can legitimately create an OP character (with almost no one on here questioning this sad fact) and also that typical 5e gameplay is so rote, repetitive, and combat-centric that being OP in this way is an issue. Just bummers all around.
No one?

A lot of us are asking what makes this character OP. One of the strength of D&D 5e is the much tighter power balance between classes vs 3.X.

We also don't know how these people play, so repetitive combat may not be the issue.

so... no, it's not a big-time indictment.
 

Grendel_Khan

Adventurer
No one?

A lot of us are asking what makes this character OP. One of the strength of D&D 5e is the much tighter power balance between classes vs 3.X.

We also don't know how these people play, so repetitive combat may not be the issue.

so... no, it's not a big-time indictment.
When I posted there were a few people questioning it, but most were just diving right as though this is a thing.

But the fact that the original poster actually thinks his character is OP, and that anyone would offer advice assuming this is true...yeah, man, that sucks. It's genuinely hard to find a system where this sort of thing is an issue. There might be character creation choices that result in being underpowered at a given type of play, but the other direction, where a specific build is OP? That's no good!

The OP also highlights something important, though--D&D is always about combat optimization. That's just what it's for.
 

When I posted there were a few people questioning it, but most were just diving right as though this is a thing.

But the fact that the original poster actually thinks his character is OP, and that anyone would offer advice assuming this is true...yeah, man, that sucks. It's genuinely hard to find a system where this sort of thing is an issue. There might be character creation choices that result in being underpowered at a given type of play, but the other direction, where a specific build is OP? That's no good!

The OP also highlights something important, though--D&D is always about combat optimization. That's just what it's for.
Half the People are, literally, confused how a tiefling fighter could be overpowered. The other half are just offering advice. Because that’s what the OP asked for.
 

Grendel_Khan

Adventurer
Half the People are, literally, confused how a tiefling fighter could be overpowered. The other half are just offering advice. Because that’s what the OP asked for.
I'm admittedly being a troublemaker here, so I'll knock it off, but my point is this--these kinds of questions and threads don't exist for a properly designed system, and particularly one that doesn't incentivize MMO-style constant combat. No one says their Street Samurai is OP because they fight better than the Netrunner/Decker, because in a cyberpunk game it's understood that fighting is only one part of the play experience, not the biggest of all possible pillars. There's something--or really lots and lots of things--about D&D that centers essentially everything around combat, creating all sorts of debates about player skill (almost always referring to combat effectiveness) and spreadsheets comparing damage-per-round calculations for every subclass and on and on. This post just seemed like a real unintentional distillation of all of that.

But, again, I'm just being a party crasher. Sometimes I can't help myself. I'll see myself out.
 

pogre

Legend
I'm admittedly being a troublemaker here, so I'll knock it off, but my point is this--these kinds of questions and threads don't exist for a properly designed system, and particularly one that doesn't incentivize MMO-style constant combat. No one says their Street Samurai is OP because they fight better than the Netrunner/Decker, because in a cyberpunk game it's understood that fighting is only one part of the play experience, not the biggest of all possible pillars. There's something--or really lots and lots of things--about D&D that centers essentially everything around combat, creating all sorts of debates about player skill (almost always referring to combat effectiveness) and spreadsheets comparing damage-per-round calculations for every subclass and on and on. This post just seemed like a real unintentional distillation of all of that.

But, again, I'm just being a party crasher. Sometimes I can't help myself. I'll see myself out.
The original poster used the term over-powered - no matter what system - folks are going to assume that it relates to combat abilities.

If I say my character is OP - the first thing that comes to mind is combat proficiency. It is a natural assumption when someone uses that label. I don't think that is a D&D centric assumption.

If I say I have an OP character in a cyberpunk game I think the natural assumption is I am referring to combat abilities. Contrary to your experience, I do hear people use the term in other systems frequently.

If you don't like combat - D&D may not be the game for you - that does not mean the game is poorly designed.
 

The Lizard Wizard

Adventurer
So in my D&D game, I have a character, which I absolutely love. He has made a large impact on the plot, which has helped move the storyline along. There is one problem though. My character is a bit overpowered. He is a Tiefling Fighter, and has a large connection to the storyline. My DM is fine with whatever decision I make. What should I do?

I'm not sure if anyone has asked, but what level is your character?
 

John R Davis

Adventurer
I get the feeling the Original Poster posted and won't post again.
If it is Overpowered maybe it
-Rolled stats
-Persuades it's why through all encounters and dominate social scenes
-Has some 3rd party-regret
-Some magic items beyond the games tier
- Is five levels higher than the other PCs.

You can easily depower them w/o removing it from the campaign
 

TheSword

Legend
I'm admittedly being a troublemaker here, so I'll knock it off, but my point is this--these kinds of questions and threads don't exist for a properly designed system, and particularly one that doesn't incentivize MMO-style constant combat. No one says their Street Samurai is OP because they fight better than the Netrunner/Decker, because in a cyberpunk game it's understood that fighting is only one part of the play experience, not the biggest of all possible pillars. There's something--or really lots and lots of things--about D&D that centers essentially everything around combat, creating all sorts of debates about player skill (almost always referring to combat effectiveness) and spreadsheets comparing damage-per-round calculations for every subclass and on and on. This post just seemed like a real unintentional distillation of all of that.

But, again, I'm just being a party crasher. Sometimes I can't help myself. I'll see myself out.
Over powered is a relative term. Could be in relation to either the difficulty of the adventure or the relative strength of other characters. Also it can have nothing to do with combat… play pathfinder for a few years and you’ll see overpowered outside of combat.

Most systems with sufficient choice can be ‘gamed’ I’m some way to create an optimal outcome.
 

Eltab

Lord of the Hidden Layer
I was DM'ing and one player told me he wanted to trade out his current character for another. The group was on a long boat trip, so I found a way to oblige: "Nessie" showed up and attacked the boat, trying to knock some munchies into the water. The player's character (along with most of the sailors 😱 but few PCs) fell overboard. I rolled a die and counted off the result: the Loch Ness Monster chose the PC to snack on first.

Next time I do that, I'm going to give Nessie the Swallow Whole ability - so I do not have to grind through all those HP, the rest of the group can try to rescue the PC in question, and Nessie can chase down more snacks before they all get back in the boat.
 

Ancalagon

Dusty Dragon
Maybe the original poster's PC isn't actually OP. Maybe the others are under powered?

I don't know what that PC is. Maybe it's something like this: "Ok, so I'm going to make a fighter, and make him dex based, duelist, background sage and a psi warrior, and distribute stats as best as I can!"

That's not an OP character. It's fun! (I'm playing one right now! :D ). But it's not amazing, it's just a competent build over a fun RP frame.

Now imagine that the other players do...
"I'm going to make a dwarf thief! He's super duper tough, but he's really clumsy!"
"I'm making a blind wizard with a bad knee! I'm going to summon elementals... one day!"
"I'm making a life cleric who only heals and has maximum charisma! She's a tortle!"

There is nothing wrong with this. This is going to be (unless the DM is a bit of a jerk) a super fun game! But in that game, the fighter is going to be a combat monster compared to the others. He's a good tank, he does the most damage, he's stealthier than the thief, is knowledgeable and is probably the best archer in the party. Even a very vanilla strength-based shield and board fighter would do great in combat in this bunch. So the original poster feels that their fighter is OP. But it isn't, in reality.
 

Azuresun

Adventurer
Yeah, I'm still waiting for Fighter and overpowered to explained in the same sentence.

It depends on how it is relative to the rest of the group. Outside of the forum bubble of ultra-optimisation, things are far more varied in the real world.

This thread is kind of a big-time indictment of 5e--the fact that you can legitimately create an OP character (with almost no one on here questioning this sad fact) and also that typical 5e gameplay is so rote, repetitive, and combat-centric that being OP in this way is an issue. Just bummers all around.

Sounds like you really hate 5e, and don't find it any fun. You might want to consider leaving a forum mostly dedicated to talking about 5e, and instead spend time in a community that talks about things you don't hate.
 

Mort

Legend
This thread is kind of a big-time indictment of 5e--the fact that you can legitimately create an OP character (with almost no one on here questioning this sad fact) and also that typical 5e gameplay is so rote, repetitive, and combat-centric that being OP in this way is an issue. Just bummers all around.

None of what you wrote has actually appeared in this thread!

We are still waiting to hear HOW the tiefling fighter is actually overpowered (especially relative to others in the group) because, this is a very unusual complaint.
 
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aco175

Legend
My group tends to have PCs that are not really optimized and could be seen as weaker if another player brought over something with good feat combos and such. I would not have a problem with it, but would need to adjust the combats. Other areas I think would be harder to overshadow.

I also find that some DMs are shy about killing a PC and have ways to save them or bring them back. There are a few threads about this. My point is that if you tell the DM it is ok to kill your PC, he may feel freed to do it. Just get in a goo monologue when you die.

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