D&D 5E Spells you house rule?


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Legend
The only spell I generally house rule in a major way is Goodberry. I make the berries poor nutrition that won't sustain you for more than a day or two on their own. I think as written it just completely eliminates provisioning as a part of travel at a level where the need for food still has interesting adventuring potential.

I like your approach. I've been contemplating this change to Goodberry:

Goodberry creates “faerie food” which can only sustain a creature for up to three days in the Material Plane. Each day beyond the first that a creature relies on a goodberry for sustenance during a week, it must succeed a Constitution saving throw (equal to the spellcaster’s spell save DC) or be unable to gain nourishment from normal mortal food for an equal amount of time.
 

Musing Mage

Pondering D&D stuff
The only spell I (currently) houserule is Witch Bolt.

The inititial strike is btb, but I treat the subsequent damage as escalating. Each round a caster sustains the witch bolt increases the damage by d8, starting with 1d12 and going up to a maximum # of dice equal to the original output of the spell.
 
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jgsugden

Legend
Unless a spell were truly broken, I would not house rule a spell. I see no truly broken 5E spells from WotC, so I do not house rule any of them. Even if I did find one, I might look at approaches that fix it without changing the spell itself, but by changing the environment in which the spell is used.

I do, however, introduce alternate versions of spells that have different mechanics, but the same goals. Why? For the same reason we have Honda, Toyota, Ford, and all the other car brands: People want to put their own tweaks on a good idea, whether for their own benefit, for pride or to profit from it. Accordingly, I have a lot of different takes on a counterspell spell. One is an aura that counters all spells cast in it (using the mechanics for counterspell). One doesn't counter the spell, but lets the reacting mage change the target of the spell to another legal target. Another captures the magic of the spell being cast and let's the reactionary caster hold onto it and recast it themself at a later point in time (unless they lose concentration before they cast it). I even have two second level versions of a counterspell: One that reduces the range and radius/area of spells (forcing the caster to reselect the target/area), and another that gives the target of a spell advantage on saving throws against the spell, the caster disadvantage on attack rolls, etc...

Some of the spells with alternate versions have alternate introduced versions that are the same level as the original, but stronger. Others are more situationally stronger, but generally weaker. It is a mix - but having that wide breadth of magics makes my world a lot less 'cookie cutter' and feel more magical.
 

Oofta

Legend
I’m not even really sure how I’d “fix” it, but I hate the play experience of Guidance. It’s either a constant game of “DM may I” or a shouting match of “Guidance!” After ever check is called for, and I hate it.
I just run it that they have to cast guidance before I call for a check. If the person doing the check declares what they're doing without asking for guidance it doesn't happen. No "Can I spot the enemy in the alley" followed by "Guidance!". If the person asks for guidance before they look that's fine.
 

Oofta

Legend
I modify a few spells, for both balance reasons and world/thematic reasons. I loosely base my cosmology on Norse mythology so to get from different realms (planes in D&D terms) you have to travel Yggdrasil, the world tree.

Travel between planes is not as simple as casting a spell, you need to find a gateway/path first. So plane shift can open the gate, but that's it. It takes powerful rituals to create a gate, it's not simple. Any extra-planar creature must come through a gate unless they are just temporarily summoned or are very low level (i.e. familiars).

Similarly banishment doesn't permanently send an extra-planar creature back to it's home plane unless you are near a gate to their realm; they can be put in a pocket dimension like every other creature.

Another aspect of Norse mythology is that even gods can die. Revivify works as normal, but when someone dies they travel through Nifleheim* (the shadowfell) to get to their final destination. If you want to raise dead you have to go into Nifleheim to retrieve the soul. Once they've passed on to their final destination it's pretty much impossible to get them back, so no resurrection. People that refuse to move on to their final resting place slowly have their humanity "evaporate" and become ghosts and other undead.

Other than that? I pretty much ban long distance teleport because it's boring. Teleportation Circle works, but you don't automatically learn anything, the sigil sequence for the circles is a closely guarded secret. On the other hand I made teleportation circle a ritual.

*like I said, my cosmology is loosely based on Norse mythology. On the other hand I had made Nifleheim a shadow world long before 4E made it official.
 

Arilyn

Hero
I haven't bothered changing very many. I have altered the cantrip, Friends. I've changed it so the target never realizes they have had a spell cast on them. It's only advantage to the roll. The caster isn't doing anything they couldn't have done without the spell. I mean buying someone a beer could get you an advantage.
 

el-remmen

Moderator Emeritus
Here is the page I have them listed on the wiki: House Ruled Spells - Ghosts of Saltmarsh

But quickie examples:
  • Conjure Animals: maximum number of conjured animals is four beasts of 1/2 CR or lower (8 are just too many to worry about in combat though I might allow an exception for non-combat uses (like a swarm of rats to scare a crowd)
  • Conjure Fey: Banned for flavor reasons
  • Conjure Minor Elementals: See Conjure Animals
  • Fireball - Makes 33,000 cubic feet of fire.
  • Crusader's Mantle - Renamed "Hero's Mantle" because Crusading is historically gross.
  • Goodberry - Up to ten berries (1d6 + your spellcasting ability modifier) appear in your hand and have the by the book effect, except they do not provide satisfaction for the sensation of hunger or thirst.
  • Leomund's Tiny Hut -
    • The material component is a piece of bread and some salt, which is consumed in the casting, along with a small fist-sized model of a house worth at least 200 gps (which is not consumed).
    • The hut is opaque from the inside, but can be made transparent by the caster by spending an action, and concentrating for up to 10 minutes.
    • The hut must be cast on a reasonable flat and clear area that can hold it.
  • Lightning Bolt - They bounce.
 
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ad_hoc

(they/them)
I’m not even really sure how I’d “fix” it, but I hate the play experience of Guidance. It’s either a constant game of “DM may I” or a shouting match of “Guidance!” After ever check is called for, and I hate it.

Ask each player to say what they're doing and then resolve their actions in turn. The character can either cast Guidance on themselves or cast it on someone they're helping.

If you're in a situation where the rest of the characters are just standing around because nothing is going on an ability check probably isn't worth calling for.
 

The only spell I generally house rule in a major way is Goodberry. I make the berries poor nutrition that won't sustain you for more than a day or two on their own. I think as written it just completely eliminates provisioning as a part of travel at a level where the need for food still has interesting adventuring potential.

That's my only nerf. There's a few spells I'll occasionally bend the rules on in players favor for rule of cool reasons, and there are some spells that have been houseruled for a campaign because we made a mistake and decided to stay consistent, but that's about it.
This reminds me of Exalted's answer to magical food: all food produced by magic is empty calories. You're getting carbs and fat and some proteins, but no vitamins or minerals (and probably only one type of protein.)

So if you try to live on goodberries, you'll get scurvy and pellagra and so on.
 

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