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D&D 5E Strixhaven Table of Contents

Strixhaven's table of contents has appeared on Reddit. The book contains 7 chapters, plus an appendix, including four adventures.
  1. Basic setting information, about 20 pages
  2. Character options, about 22 pages
  3. 4 adventures organized in a unified campaign, about 32 pages per adventure (plus general campaign organizational tools which take up about 20 pages)
  4. NPCs & monsters, about 42 pages

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Kurotowa

Legend
Always with the tons of adventures when people have been wanting the opposite --- more game material and less adventures. :cautious:
You know, there's always a few people saying that, but personally I'm enjoying this era of quality over quantity. Tasha's Cauldron has as much good stuff as a year or two of 3e release schedule books, and at a fraction of the cost. Besides, given the sales numbers for Curse of Strahd, it seems people very much do want books like this.
 

darjr

I crit!
You know, there's always a few people saying that, but personally I'm enjoying this era of quality over quantity. Tasha's Cauldron has as much good stuff as a year or two of 3e release schedule books, and at a fraction of the cost. Besides, given the sales numbers for Curse of Strahd, it seems people very much do want books like this.
And the sales of the last adventure. But also the sales of the Dragon book are also off the charts compared to the others, well except maybe the PHB. Though it's tops of the PHB now. It's been in the 100 + sales rank on Amazon for a while now. Started in preorder.

BUT. I think that is a testament to how good it is vs some kind of need for MOAR books of its kind. Quality over quantity and it shows in the sales.
 

Honestly, I have no probs with a book being an adventure path/campaign if it has some form of crunch to mine for in the beginning sections of the book. Wilds Beyond the Witchlight gives us the Rabbit G-Haregon and Fairy for Dungeons and Dragons as well as two backgrounds. Not much but it's still something. Strixhaven is giving us a bit more crunch to cherry pick which is great.
 

AdmundfortGeographer

Getting lost in fantasy maps
Feels like it was easiest to rip out the rules crunch of subclasses that accept multiple classes and swap in an adventure to make Covid-affected publish dates.
 



And the sales of the last adventure. But also the sales of the Dragon book are also off the charts compared to the others, well except maybe the PHB. Though it's tops of the PHB now. It's been in the 100 + sales rank on Amazon for a while now. Started in preorder.

BUT. I think that is a testament to how good it is vs some kind of need for MOAR books of its kind. Quality over quantity and it shows in the sales.
Hopefully we'll see that sort of focused monster book in the future, instead of the "lets pick random groups of monsters" strategy of VGtM and MtoF, I mean, they weren't awful (although some of the flavor text in Volo's might now raise an eyebrow or two now), but they were just so scattershot. VGtM would have worked better if they had just stuck to humanoids, and MToF to extra-planar creatures. Hopefully the success of FToD means more focused books like it in the future (of course, its success is almost certainly due in part to "Dragons" being in the title, but that doesn't invalidate my main point!)
 

Marandahir

Crown-Forester
I mean, the adventures are 120 pages and the rest of the book is 100 pages. I think it's pretty darn close.

(Note that I'm counting Pages 40-60 as non-adventures because they're laying out more of the setting details and characters who show up in the various adventures).
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
I mean, the adventures are 120 pages and the rest of the book is 100 pages. I think it's pretty darn close.

(Note that I'm counting Pages 40-60 as non-adventures because they're laying out more of the setting details and characters who show up in the various adventures).
While it is more Adventure than previous Setting books have had, it is also more Setting than previous Adventure books have had, proportionally.

WotC folks have said that the important element of "Setting" to them is about adjusting genre expectations, and that is what this book does: provide campaign guidelines for a divergence from the base games assumed genre tropes.
 

whimsychris123

Adventurer
While it is more Adventure than previous Setting books have had, it is also more Setting than previous Adventure books have had, proportionally.

WotC folks have said that the important element of "Setting" to them is about adjusting genre expectations, and that is what this book does: provide campaign guidelines for a divergence from the base games assumed genre tropes.
My main concern is that this appears as a “setting” book that doesn’t offer the same amount of material for multiple campaigns. How much does this portend future “settings” books?

With settings like Eberron, Wildemount or Forgotten Realms, an imaginative DM could easily spend a lifetime developing adventures and campaigns. However, with the scant material of this book, multiple campaigns would almost be like starting from scratch. Maybe I’ll feel differently once I see the books, but I this feels like a one-and-done campaign setting.
 

Jacqual

Explorer
I can really see WotC doing this from now on as an adventure/setting book is bought by the DM, while player options is bought be players. If a book incorporates all of the above more books will be sold as both players and DM's get use of them.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
My main concern is that this appears as a “setting” book that doesn’t offer the same amount of material for multiple campaigns. How much does this portend future “settings” books?

With settings like Eberron, Wildemount or Forgotten Realms, an imaginative DM could easily spend a lifetime developing adventures and campaigns. However, with the scant material of this book, multiple campaigns would almost be like starting from scratch. Maybe I’ll feel differently once I see the books, but I this feels like a one-and-done campaign setting.
It probably portends very little for Setting products overall, other than showing that WotC is willing to experiment.
 

It probably portends very little for Setting products overall, other than showing that WotC is willing to experiment.
I'm not so sure.

It looks a lot to me like this is WotCs preferred model for perhaps more experiemental settings. It's not like there's a lack of precedent either - remember Ravenloft was brought into 5e as an adventure module and the setting book only came much later once the module had proven successful (and imho this was one of the reasons Van Richten's was such a big miss for me - WotC tried to stuff all of Ravenloft into a single domain in CoS, and then go back and expand it into a setting in VRGtR while keeping all the dodgy shortcuts and handwaves and setting design laziness from CoS)

It looks a lot to me like Witchlight functionally is the 5e Feywild sourcebook, for instance. It looks a lot to me like WotC are going to dribble out FR setting material in dribs and drabs in their big adventure books too, rather than ever replace the deeply inadequate SCAG. And remember that WotC has also said that one of the upcoming legacy settings will be in a 'new and never before seen format' or something along those lines. Wouldn't at all surprise me to see that book being (for instance) a Spelljammer hardback adventure with 20 pages of token setting material up the front, or similar for Dark Sun.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
I'm not so sure.

It looks a lot to me like this is WotCs preferred model for perhaps more experiemental settings. It's not like there's a lack of precedent either - remember Ravenloft was brought into 5e as an adventure module and the setting book only came much later once the module had proven successful (and imho this was one of the reasons Van Richten's was such a big miss for me - WotC tried to stuff all of Ravenloft into a single domain in CoS, and then go back and expand it into a setting in VRGtR while keeping all the dodgy shortcuts and handwaves and setting design laziness from CoS)

It looks a lot to me like Witchlight functionally is the 5e Feywild sourcebook, for instance. It looks a lot to me like WotC are going to dribble out FR setting material in dribs and drabs in their big adventure books too, rather than ever replace the deeply inadequate SCAG. And remember that WotC has also said that one of the upcoming legacy settings will be in a 'new and never before seen format' or something along those lines. Wouldn't at all surprise me to see that book being (for instance) a Spelljammer hardback adventure with 20 pages of token setting material up the front, or similar for Dark Sun.
Sword Coast Adventuers's Guide is, at least, adequate and a major seller to boot. I wouldn't expect a replacement, maybe in 2024, but even maybe nor then.

The Ravenloft book is a good counter to your concern: it is more in line with the Eberron or Ravnica books. The reality is that WotC will probably make these decisions on a case by case basis.
 

They are following the same pattern as the Paizo adventure path model.

Adventure material : 57-63 pages : 63-69%
Setting: 6 -12 pages : 7-13%
Options: 6 pages : 7%
NPCs and Monsters: 16 pages : 18%

Adventure material: 142 pages : 64%
setting details: 27 pages : 12%
Player material: 12 pages : 5%
NPCs and monsters: 42 pages : 19%
If the monsters section have every time the same amount of space and looking at the MM as the preferred manual of my kids (9 years) I must accept the fact that monsters sells a lot. But anyway I'm totally unable to understand why people needs this amount of different monsters in their game.
 



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