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Suggestion on how to improve players roleplay....

Bonedagger

First Post
There seems to be so many "How do I get better roleplaying from my players" threads around. So instead of posting responses to all of them I just desided to make a new thread (The moderators must love this trend :D). Anyway.



A trick I often use is to have a none-player close at hand. As a DM I sometimes need to step aside for a minute or two. When that happens I improvise an encounter. Something that only involves roleplaying. "Bribe your way through here." "See if you can haggle the price.... Maybe using some charm will help" etc. Then I quickly instuct the none-player about his/her role, limits and what he/she think about the PC's.

It's also good if I need some in-game conversation between two NPC's.

It even add to the mode that when I, as an NPC say "guards" or "waitress" I actually hear a real response (I require quick improvisation-skills :)).

Also. When the players suddenly need to turn around to see the one speaking it "wakes them up".
 
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kengar

First Post
The fact is I think Robin Laws got it right in his book on GM-ing. There are different kinds of players and it *is* possible to cater to several types. The secret is to know what kind of players you have in your group and make sure there is something for everyone. If a DM and his players can't "share" the time and story with one another, then they probably shouldn't be playing together. This means the powergamers need to let the roleplayers have a chance to play things out with an NPC occasionally and the DM needs to make sure there is a chance for an old-fashioned hackfest once in a while with potential loot.

Basically, I try to tell the powergamers and buttkickers in my group that there's no reason they can't kill and loot in character, but if that is their characters ONLY solution to a situation, then they are psychotic and will end up imprisoned or dead eventually.

Here's a thought: play an evil campaign. Why not? The roleplayers would be able to explore the "dark side" for a while and the hackers can go nuts. If they're "indiscreet," then the law might get after them, or a high level paladin or what have you; which is an adventure/campaign in and of itself. You're not punishing them for playing evil; there can be all kinds of loot and xp as they pillage. They just make enemies instead of friends and eventually it may cost them. Make them RP evil as well. Turn the tables on them, if he wants to be CE, give him a puppy to shoot (metaphorically). :D

just my 2cp
 

Bonedagger

First Post
kengar said:
The fact is I think Robin Laws got it right in his book on GM-ing.
just my 2cp

There's actually a book about that? lol

I don't have any problems with my players. In fact we are having a lot of fun. I just thought I would share some ideas.
 

Mahiro Satsu

First Post
My group is dyfunctional. one or two love being in character and actually roleplaying, the others i have know idea why they show up when they do.
 

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