Tell me about your Adventures in Middle-Earth experiences, please

erachima

Explorer
If you're going to set a DnD game on Middle Earth, you're pretty much forced to be Elf Lords in order to have access to 90% of the system.

The players also probably want to mostly be Elf Lords, though, so this is less of a problem than it sounds like.
 

zedturtle

Explorer
If you're going to set a DnD game on Middle Earth, you're pretty much forced to be Elf Lords in order to have access to 90% of the system.

The players also probably want to mostly be Elf Lords, though, so this is less of a problem than it sounds like.
Are you familiar with Adventures in Middle-earth? We have custom Classes and custom Cultures so that we can use the base 5e mechanics but have folks fit into the world.
 

MockingBird

Explorer
You sold me. I'm assuming the players guide is the first book I should start with? After that what should I get so I can run a campaign?
 

zedturtle

Explorer
You sold me. I'm assuming the players guide is the first book I should start with? After that what should I get so I can run a campaign?
Yep, you're right, the Player's Guide is the place to start. It has all the rules to start playing in Middle-earth.

You'll benefit greatly from the Loremaster's Guide. Not only does it have lots of advice on bringing the game to life, it also has a bestiary, rules on magical artefacts and a breakdown of the mechanics behind the various components of the game. (In Adventures, a Journey or an Audience can be as important {and perhaps as dangerous} as a combat and the LMG breaks down the math on these so you can make your own tables.)

Then you'll want to determine where you want to start. Wilderland Adventures is a set of seven ready-to-run adventures that form a great campaign. You start with simple things like escorting a merchant through Mirkwood and dealing with missing Hobbits and by the end you're conferring with King Bard, fighting an ancient and evil spirit, and negotiating (hopefully — you certainly don't want to be fighting) with a Dragon.

For a slightly more sedate but open-ended start, you could look at the Bree-land Region Guide. Usually we produce a set of adventures for an area and a corresponding regional guide. Because Bree-land is a bit smaller than some of the other regions, you get both in one hardcover volume here. So you get three ready-to-run adventures, plus several adventure outlines and lots of adventure hooks.

And, of course, there's lots more.
 

zedturtle

Explorer
I'll just add that if AiMe appeals to you, just play the game it's based on: The One Ring.
While I have a deep and abiding love for The One Ring, sometimes you just can't get a group to learn a new system. It's great that the core of 5e is flexible enough to easily adapt it to Middle-earth.
 
Middle Earth never felt like a setting that needed its own rulebook. Disallow certain classes, be very specific in the monsters you select and you can use 5E without problem.

Most of the differences between ME and most 5E campaigns is over the game focus and style.
 

BookBarbarian

Expert Long Rester
Just started reading AiME and for the most part like what I've seen. However, I'm wondering if anyone has any thoughts regarding character balance. For example the Dunedain culture from first glance simply seems more powerful with four Ability score increases and two Skill proficiencies.
Dunedain do get some advantages over other human cultures, but with regard to Cultural Heirlooms and even cultural Virtues I think they fall behind. They have a slight advantage in the beginning, but not enough to tip game balance IMHO.

There are much worse problems with balance however (I'm looking at you level 17+ Barding Foehammer Slayer with the Swordmaster Virtue able to get 31 AC without magic items, and be resistant to the most common forms of damage while in a Fury)
 

MockingBird

Explorer
In case folks are on the edge and looking for a push to jump in, there's a big warehouse sale going on right now.

Man that is tempting. I really want to give these books a spin. I like the looks and art work too and I know it would look great on my book shelf. I just bought BG: DiA and need to throttle back.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
Sorry for the necro, but this thread has been incredibly helpful. Thanks for the insight everyone, I’m definitely sold on AIME.

Do folks with some experience with it have any thoughts they’d be willing to share on how adaptable it would be to non-LOTR settings? Not, like, Forgotten Realms or anything, but something similarly low-magic and with similar themes.
 

BookBarbarian

Expert Long Rester
There was a thread on here about someone adapting it for an ASOIAF campaign.

Anyway here is what I think. The Shadow system is pretty tied to the setting. It could work for another setting if that setting had the same assumption that the player characters are enemies of The Shadow (whatever that shadow might be) and doing immoral things leaves a toll on a character. Otherwise you can scrap the shadow system entirely without effecting anything else.

The only other thing I'd watch out for is that the spell less Ranger, The Wanderer, and spell less Bard, the Warden, are both given boosts with regards to the games Journey and Audience systems receptively.

Without implementing Journeys and Audiences those two classes might feel like they lagging behind. Aside from that I think it would play fine.
 

Beleriphon

Totally Awesome Pirate Brain
Sorry for the necro, but this thread has been incredibly helpful. Thanks for the insight everyone, I’m definitely sold on AIME.

Do folks with some experience with it have any thoughts they’d be willing to share on how adaptable it would be to non-LOTR settings? Not, like, Forgotten Realms or anything, but something similarly low-magic and with similar themes.
I think it would work well for anything aiming for low magic with an emphasis on travel. I can it working relatively well for something like The Black Company or potentially The Witcher (assuming nobody wants to be witcher or a sorcerer).
 

BookBarbarian

Expert Long Rester
I think it would work well for anything aiming for low magic with an emphasis on travel. I can it working relatively well for something like The Black Company or potentially The Witcher (assuming nobody wants to be witcher or a sorcerer).
You just reminded me I have an introductory PDF for the Witcher TTRPG that I never read through. Time to read that now.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
I think it would work well for anything aiming for low magic with an emphasis on travel. I can it working relatively well for something like The Black Company or potentially The Witcher (assuming nobody wants to be witcher or a sorcerer).
Perfect!
 

Mistwell

Hero
The impression I got from several people who have played the 5e game and the actual One Ring game is that the One Ring game works better for this genre than the 5e version, and that it might be best to just play the One Ring itself if you want to adventure in Middle Earth.
 

BookBarbarian

Expert Long Rester
The impression I got from several people who have played the 5e game and the actual One Ring game is that the One Ring game works better for this genre than the 5e version, and that it might be best to just play the One Ring itself if you want to adventure in Middle Earth.
This has been mentioned. Zedturtle's reply echoes my own thoughts on the matter:

While I have a deep and abiding love for The One Ring, sometimes you just can't get a group to learn a new system. It's great that the core of 5e is flexible enough to easily adapt it to Middle-earth.
 

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