The Sort of TTRPGs You Want More (and Less) Of

Count_Zero

Adventurer
For what I'm personally looking for:

I want a, basically, modular cyberpunk RPG. If I want fantasy elements like Shadowrun, I can use the magic rules (or take them out if my setting doesn't do that), some rules for powered armor or moderately large monsters if I'm doing something like Appleseed or Bubblegum Crisis, and a choice of light or heavy hacking rules depending on how much the group wants hacking to be a part of the game.

And I really don't want to do it in a Fate or Blades derivative. The way I teach myself a game to run it is to run a solo adventure or campaign with some pre-gens I've created myself - and while I appreciate what those games do, the way they handle game narrative basically means that for me to feel comfortable enough with the game to run it myself, I'd have to play a game that someone else was running first... and nobody in my group is interested in running cyberpunk at the moment.
 

Aldarc

Hero
Going back, when thinking about the sort of TTRPGs I would love to see, I decided to jot down a list of the sort of stories that I would want to be able to emerge out of character play:
  • The Earthsea Cycle by Ursula K. Le Guin
  • Chronicles of Prydain by Lloyd Alexander
  • The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
  • The Last Unicorn by Peter S. Beagle
  • The Dark Crystal by Jim Henson & Brian Froud
  • The Twelve Kingdoms / Juni Kokki by Fuyumi Ono
  • Princess Mononoke / Mononoke Hime by Hayao Miyazyki

Similar-ish Games:
  • Blue Rose
  • Beyond the Wall and Other Adventures
  • The One Ring

I think that one of the unifying aspects that perhaps draws me to these works is that they are typically not tinged with the sort of grim dark cynicism that pervades a lot of other "adult" fantasy or fantasy TTRPGs.
 

Jd Smith1

Explorer
Settings which have depth, careful thought in the design, and original concepts.

They are very rare; the market is glutted with shallow, generalized settings based on slight variations of the traditional D&D or sci-fi settings.
 

FaerieGodfather

Aberrant Druid
I love the fact that Old School D&D is making such a huge resurgence... but it seems like so much of the OSR community is only into FFVN, grimdark, and horror gaming.

That's not what I played in the Old School.

Everyone's talking about Spelljammer for 5e, but where's the Spelljammer OSR? Where is my Saturday morning cartoon D&D, my Hong Kong action-fantasy D&D, my incomprehensible 30 year old JRPG D&D?

I mean, I'm trying to be the change I want to see in the world... but I can't be the only person who likes this stuff, can I?
 

DwarfHammer

Explorer
At first glance, this seems like Blue Rose, where there is a prevalent lack of blasting magic. It's typical magic covers things like psychic powers, divination, elemental shaping, animism, and meditation. Blasting magic does exist, albeit as dark, corruptive "sorcery." However, it is a setting where is magic is more akin to talents or powers, so it is "at-will," but cast against fatigue checks.

I get this. One of my favorite summoning mages I have seen has been in Invisible Sun by the Goetic "class." Every time that you summon a creature (e.g., demon, spirit, angel, fey, etc.), the summoner has to negotiate the cost and task. I too would enjoy - for certain settings and/or games - a greater weight to the magical process and distinctions between magical types.

For one campaign setting idea that I brainstormed, I wanted to toy with a world where the constellations embodied divine figures, astrology was real and suggestive of a person's nature, fate, and divine favor. And star priests served as astrologers and astronomers who divined the future, portents, and divine will from the stars, used astrology to play matchmakers, and called upon the astral heavens for blessings.

So I also would definitely be interested in something other than just repackaged D&D-style spell slot magic.

I do agree that it remains a solid game. What I would probably prefer is something more akin to a True20 version of the AGE system. Blue Rose (AGE) is probably the closest version, as its magic system most closely harkens back to how it was in Blue Rose/True20, but I don't see FAGE going in that direction.
Not at all referring to blasting spells in my example. Just an example of how an example can be taken the wrong way. lol. Love it.

Blue rose is exactly a game I don’t like. lol
 
There are a lot of TTRPGs out there in the market, and more are being produced every day. There are a lot games covering a tremendous breadth of genres and the like, but what sort of TTRPGs would you like to see more of? This is an intentionally broad question that is meant to cover a variety of matters covering the system, genre, tone, or setting.

Though I would not necessarily like to focus on this, though it is related, maybe what sort of games do you think that the market may have too much or enough of already?

I'll wait a bit to gather contributions before making my own.
Not trying to start an edition war. Thus just happens to be the most accurate way for me to answer the question.

Ttrpgs I'd like to see less of: 4e d&d, pathfinder, gurps, vampire the masquerade.

Ttrpgs I'd like to see more of: call of cthulu, wheel of time, flame princess, cypher systems, and any that are similar to any edition of d&d other than 4e and 5e.
 
I love the fact that Old School D&D is making such a huge resurgence... but it seems like so much of the OSR community is only into FFVN, grimdark, and horror gaming.

That's not what I played in the Old School.

Everyone's talking about Spelljammer for 5e, but where's the Spelljammer OSR? Where is my Saturday morning cartoon D&D, my Hong Kong action-fantasy D&D, my incomprehensible 30 year old JRPG D&D?

I mean, I'm trying to be the change I want to see in the world... but I can't be the only person who likes this stuff, can I?
You are not alone. I and several others here also like the older stuff. There just arent that many of us.
 
I like rules that reflect the setting and intended mode of play, not so much the toolbox approach of systems like Savage Worlds, GURPS, FATE, etc. So I'm more into WHFRPG, Forbidden Lands, Star Wars, D&D, etc. The toolbox approach just takes too much fiddling by the GM to fit a campaign feel; there are so many optional rules that a GM needs to make a primer for each campaign.
What I'd love is a streamlined D&D/OSR type of game that doesn't use a "character funnel" - where there is a chance of character survival.
 
I like rules that reflect the setting and intended mode of play, not so much the toolbox approach of systems like Savage Worlds, GURPS, FATE, etc. So I'm more into WHFRPG, Forbidden Lands, Star Wars, D&D, etc. The toolbox approach just takes too much fiddling by the GM to fit a campaign feel; there are so many optional rules that a GM needs to make a primer for each campaign.
What I'd love is a streamlined D&D/OSR type of game that doesn't use a "character funnel" - where there is a chance of character survival.
I think taking a cypher system and slightly modding/retrofitting it to a d&d world setting and some d&d-like abilities could acheive that quite nicely.
 

DwarfHammer

Explorer
I notice a lot of not wanting to play other rpg systems. Yet we want to make d&d like those other systems. Any quite fathom that. Now I understand a small tweak here and there to create a different setting. But some of this stuff is a major rewrite.
 
Numenera wasn't a hit with our group. Could Cypher be a better fit?
The balance seemed off. The DR was so high, most characters couldn't do anything. The wizard could only spam one power and it got boring.
 
I don't have time to learn a new system. Heck, I barely have time to learn D&D. Other than updates here and there and new source material, I don't need other RPG's. However, I also don't feel the need to keep them from others.
 

Aldarc

Hero
I love the fact that Old School D&D is making such a huge resurgence... but it seems like so much of the OSR community is only into FFVN, grimdark, and horror gaming.
Same. There is a lot of creativity in the OSR, but a lot of it does feel like it's catering to this sort of niche.

Not at all referring to blasting spells in my example. Just an example of how an example can be taken the wrong way. lol. Love it.

Blue rose is exactly a game I don’t like. lol
Okay. You had listed characters with blasting/attack superpowers, such as a laser vision, atomic power, etc. so I thought you were talking more about blasting mutants. Blue Rose does have genetic overlap with the superhero genre, since it came out of Mutants & Masterminds, but it's meant to be more like magical talent in the romantic and young adult fantasy fiction. Admittedly, Blue Rose is not for everyone's taste, but it does emulate its genre well.

Numenera wasn't a hit with our group. Could Cypher be a better fit?
The balance seemed off. The DR was so high, most characters couldn't do anything. The wizard could only spam one power and it got boring.
If you don't like Numenera, you probably won't like the generic Cypher System.
 

FaerieGodfather

Aberrant Druid
For the most part, I don't want to say there's any kind of game I want to see less of-- there's a whole lot of stuff I'm just not interested in, but I'm genuinely happy that it does exist for the people who are into it.

I buy a lot of random, cheap 3pp for PF and 5e, and a lot of it just makes me think "well, that could have been a cheeseburger", but I'm sure one of the other two guys who bought it... enjoyed it enough for the three of us, and I'm happy. I helped someone keep doing something that makes them happy, by making other people happy, and that makes me happy.

It seems like an unfortunate time to mention that I never liked proprietary dice. I hope Star Wars and Legend of the Five Rings come back soon. After my violent rejection of the last two versions of Gamma World, and the ugliness surrounding them, I hope Gamma World comes back soon. I've been trying to wrap my head around Palladium for years, and I've never been able to, but I hope they're with us forever and I hope Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles comes back soon. (I am aware of FERAL; I back the Patreon campaign off-and-on.) I hope Masters of the Universe gets another chance, and brings the Princesses of Power with it.

4e/5e and PF2 have already eliminated the parts of D&D I absolutely hated the most, though for various other reasons I'm still not interested in them.

So... really... the only thing I would even suggest I want to see less of in RPGs is morality mechanics, especially the kind that leverage mental illness as a punishment for "immoral" behavior.
 

aramis erak

Adventurer
I love the fact that Old School D&D is making such a huge resurgence... but it seems like so much of the OSR community is only into FFVN, grimdark, and horror gaming.
What is FFVN?

That's not what I played in the Old School.
I'd love to see less judging of people by "I didn't play that way back then"... most styles of play existed by 1979... by '79, there were over a dozen RPGs in print, and several that had gone out of print. Including people doing Gor inspired D&D campaigns. Some people doing Theater of the Mind, others playing D&D as a minis-wargame, and most spots in between.

Call of Cthulhu was popular from release onward, and the Cthulhu Mythos was also a strong presence in AD&D... I didn't use much from it, other than illithids (aka Mind Flayers), but the '77 Monster Manual has a number of other references besides the Illithids. So, at least by '77, TSR was supporting the "D&D as horror game"... and it became much more open when Ravenloft was released in '83.

Everyone's talking about Spelljammer for 5e, but where's the Spelljammer OSR? Where is my Saturday morning cartoon D&D, my Hong Kong action-fantasy D&D, my incomprehensible 30 year old JRPG D&D?

I mean, I'm trying to be the change I want to see in the world... but I can't be the only person who likes this stuff, can I?
Even in its heydey, I can't recall anyone I knew actually playing the Spelljammer setting. When I gave a party a spelljamming helm, they never even tried going more than double bowshot range from the ground. Not just once, but three separate campaigns. But there are people who played it. I just couldn't meet any back in the day. I inherited my copies from a roommate who bailed...
 
What is FFVN?



I'd love to see less judging of people by "I didn't play that way back then"... most styles of play existed by 1979... by '79, there were over a dozen RPGs in print, and several that had gone out of print. Including people doing Gor inspired D&D campaigns. Some people doing Theater of the Mind, others playing D&D as a minis-wargame, and most spots in between.

Call of Cthulhu was popular from release onward, and the Cthulhu Mythos was also a strong presence in AD&D... I didn't use much from it, other than illithids (aka Mind Flayers), but the '77 Monster Manual has a number of other references besides the Illithids. So, at least by '77, TSR was supporting the "D&D as horror game"... and it became much more open when Ravenloft was released in '83.


Even in its heydey, I can't recall anyone I knew actually playing the Spelljammer setting. When I gave a party a spelljamming helm, they never even tried going more than double bowshot range from the ground. Not just once, but three separate campaigns. But there are people who played it. I just couldn't meet any back in the day. I inherited my copies from a roommate who bailed...
Bump
I was also confused as to what FFVN is.
 

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