TSR settings sales numbers from Ben Riggs, starting with Lankmar, Maztica, Al-Qadim and Planescape!


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Zardnaar

Legend
Yeah, I think it was something like that. The whole thing was tongue-in-cheek and really entertaining. NZ was listed as a nation still loyal to the Queen (and therefore right-thinking), while IIRC they put AU as the "Disunited States of Autralia" or something like that (and there were a lot of "Disunited States of X" in there). Again, my memory is vague, but I think somewhere in the NZ portion they also had a Doctor Who reference.

Queen will be diaplaced. Well more likely her descendents. Treaty of Waitangi 2 we'll give the UK to the Maori.
 
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overgeeked

B/X Known World
This would be my guess.

Also its a brand name that isn't going to fly in 2022. So not even a nostalgia market to tap.
Those two are not mutually exclusive. A property having a name that’s out of fashion has nothing to do with whether people have nostalgia for that thing. There almost certainly is a nostalgia market to tap. WotC chooses not to tap it based on the name…except, you know, selling the line as PDFs on drivethrurpg.

Also, it’s really weird how focused this is. I live near three markets wholly owned and operated by people of Asian descent and all three have the word “oriental” in the sign. Several more nearby Asian markets are more specific, Vietnamese, Korean, and Japanese.
 



grimslade

Krampus ate my d20s
Hmm, so my experience with Planescape sales was not just anecdata or at least corresponded with the actual data. What is interesting is what happened after WotC acquired TSR and what happened with setting sales. 3E focused mainly on FR and Eberron with 2 small Greyhawk books to promote RPGA. 4E focused on FR and DS. We know WotC was skeptical of releasing Eberron in 5E. VRGtR and Spelljammer 5E will also give a lot of data on how sales of campaign material will do in the current market.
I am omitting the MtG setting books and Exandria because the data would be determinable by the size of those properties' fandoms. They were much easier decisions to make.
 

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
I think that Eberron was the first completely new and original D&D campaign setting produced by Wizards of the Coast...is that right? And it was the only completely new and original campaign setting for almost two decades, until Exandria was released in 2019. Every other campaign setting they've published has either been a re-release of older campaign settings, or was based on other games and IP (Diablo II, Warcraft, Magic: the Gathering). And it can be argued that Exandria isn't a WotC original, since it was first published by Green Ronin two years earlier.

For better or worse, TSR released 14 new and original campaign settings in 16 years, while WotC has only published two in 22 years. Is this an example of "less is more," or maybe "quality over quantity?" It seems like the safer strategy for WotC, at any rate: if they only spend money developing things that are tried and true, that already have a fan base, they can eliminate a lot of market uncertainty.

TSR took a lot more risks than WotC. To their ruin, it would seem.
 
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I think that Eberron was the first completely new and original D&D campaign setting produced by Wizards of the Coast...is that right? And it was the only completely new and original campaign setting for almost two decades, until Exandria was released in 2019. Every other campaign setting they've published has either been a re-release of older campaign settings, or was based on other games and IP (Diablo II, Warcraft, Magic: the Gathering). And it can be argued that Exandria isn't a WotC original, since it was first published by Green Ronin two years earlier.

For better or worse, TSR released 14 new and original campaign settings in 16 years, while WotC has only published two in 22 years. Is this an example of "less is more," or maybe "quality over quantity?" It seems like the safer strategy for WotC, at any rate: if they only spend money developing things that are tried and true, that already have a fan base, they can eliminate a lot of market uncertainty.

TSR took a lot more risks than WotC. To their ruin, it would seem.
You forgot Ghostwalk, and technically Jakandor.
 

South by Southwest

Incorrigible Daydreamer
It's probably derived from God's own.

Kinda pretty here early colonists "Gods own land". Nickname basically.
Found it! It's The Wizard's map (and it turns out I still had my copy down in my basement):

newworldmapwizardsprojection.jpg
 




Reynard

Legend
Sure, that’s why I added technically. And Ghostwalk was one and done. I suspect WotC knew the proliferation of settings had contributed to TSRs issues and was gun shy for quit a while. Eberron arrived when 3E sales started to flag perhaps.
I think Eberron's timing proves that 3.5 was planned from the very beginning.
 

grimslade

Krampus ate my d20s
Sure, that’s why I added technically. And Ghostwalk was one and done. I suspect WotC knew the proliferation of settings had contributed to TSRs issues and was gun shy for quit a while. Eberron arrived when 3E sales started to flag perhaps.
I believe the setting contest was a brilliant marketing device. Eberron was a campaign by committee ultimately, but Keith Baker's passion for the setting has been a constant. I think that is what a lot of the smaller selling settings lacked, a champion and face to put to the setting. FR has Ed Greenwood. Greyhawk is Gygaxian and has had many champions over the years. Dragonlance has Hickman and Weiss. Dark Sun? Troy Denning was the author of the DS Prism Pentad, but he is a prodigious author of lots of material in lots of settings. Planescape? Ravenloft? There is no 'go to' person for answers about what is the setting about.
 

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