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Unearthed Arcana: Barbarian and Monk

Russ Morrissey

Comments

This is just ridiculous, a Flumph, really? Whatever happened to Barbarians hating magic? The longer I play D&D the more its seems that classes are just a bunch of powers/classes features. They should just give players a race and a set number of points per level with which you can buy whatever features you want. Theyve already gotten rid of race and ability score requirements and max level restrictions; I think its time to get rid of the class system all together. Itd be interesting to see the class features from the PHB compiled by level with a numeric point buy assigned and see what a 3rd or 4th level character built from a few fighter, rogue, and wizard features would look and play like. This is something that Ive thought about doing for awhile but just havent.
The OSR community is ready to embrace you.

You can get compatible versions of everything through 2E, tons of 3E variants and some efforts in 4E. Many of these are combined with modern improvements, like ascending armor class and advantage/disadvantage.

As much as I like 5E, the OSR scene is probably where most of the really interesting D&D stuff is happening.
 
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Whoa there! I wouldn't mind a Swordcerer actually...
Make the martial attacks sorcerer-specific spells and you're three-quarters of the way there. Back in 3E, I was tinkering with a spell that made the caster's melee attacks (usually requiring a certain type of weapon, like a scimitar, depending on what NPC I was thinking of giving the spell to) a ranged attack instead. (This would be some sort of Arabian Nights sorcerer-swordsman, in this case.)

Creating new spells is probably the easiest way to tweak existing classes, IME.
 

R_J_K75

Explorer
The OSR community is ready to embrace you.

You can get compatible versions of everything through 2E, tons of 3E variants and some efforts in 4E. Many of these are combined with modern improvements, like armor class that goes up and advantage/disadvantage.

As much as I like 5E, the OSR scene is probably where most of the really interesting D&D stuff is happening.
Where would I find some material to look into?
 

lowkey13

I'm sorry, Dave. I'm afraid I can't do that.
Where would I find some material to look into?
Start here.
 

lowkey13

I'm sorry, Dave. I'm afraid I can't do that.
Yeah, it sucked when the grocery stores took away all of the separate jars of peanut butter and jelly after that happened.
Woah. That’s profound!

Did you think of that all by yourself ... because I’m all like, “That’s a natural 20 right there.”
 

doctorbadwolf

Adventurer
Magic as technology = Magitech. That the magical choo-choo trains don't have wheels doesn't make them not magitech.

People are more familiar with the Golem than you seem to think, and if they aren't, then they will be even harder pressed to disabuse of the idea of the Warforged as magic robots (which is appropriate, given that they are magic robots).
I’ve introduced many people to dnd using Eberron and warforged, and it has never once been confusing for them to explain that they aren’t robots, but instead are beings of living wood and stone imbued with sentience by magic, who seem to be just as likely to have souls as a human is.

Most of them have, at most, vaguely heard the word “golem” before, but haven’t a clue what it is.

Calling them magical robots (or rather, when other people do so before I can give an explanation of what they actually are) absolutely leads to confusion, however, where suddenly I have to explain over and over that they aren’t mechanical, they don’t have programming that simulates emotion but instead actually feel things, etc.
 

Parmandur

Legend
I’ve introduced many people to dnd using Eberron and warforged, and it has never once been confusing for them to explain that they aren’t robots, but instead are beings of living wood and stone imbued with sentience by magic, who seem to be just as likely to have souls as a human is.

Most of them have, at most, vaguely heard the word “golem” before, but haven’t a clue what it is.

Calling them magical robots (or rather, when other people do so before I can give an explanation of what they actually are) absolutely leads to confusion, however, where suddenly I have to explain over and over that they aren’t mechanical, they don’t have programming that simulates emotion but instead actually feel things, etc.
Do they not have programming that simulates emotion? Seems an open question in the setting.
 

Parmandur

Legend
They do not have programming that simulates emotion; they demonstrably have souls indistinguishable from other mortal races. The open questions are why and how they have said souls.
That seems to be part of the point behind the Archivist Subclass for the Artificer, based on what Jeremy Crawford said. But then, that opens up the question of what is a soul in D&D...
 

lowkey13

I'm sorry, Dave. I'm afraid I can't do that.
But then, that opens up the question of what is a soul in D&D...
Souls are what real people have.

Spirits are what terrible critters, and elves, have, which is why you can't bring them back from the dead (not that you'd want to, and yes, I'm talking to you, Brad "Ima play an elven archer Legolas for the 50th time").
 
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Astral monk seems like a good psychic subclass (it is almost like you are punching people...with your mind)--I wonder if this is a prelude to psychic melee subclasses.

Those poor flumphs, summoned just to blow up. I'm so sad....

Other than magic reserve, everything else looks very interesting for the wild soul barb.
So as written it looks like the arms are only a weapon not actual usable arms. So no grappling with them?
 

gyor

Adventurer
I’d argue that it’s only even magitech by a fairly loose definition. The train doesn’t even have wheels. It’s levitated and propelled by a spell. There are no guns, and no actually mechanical machines. By far, most magitech worlds have actual post medieval or even futuristic technology that is fueled by magic. Eberron doesn’t. It has magic that sometimes looks like things we did with tech IRL, and solves many of the challenges that we solved with tech.

That’s an important difference. It dramatically changes how people approach the setting.

There is no pseudo science running the airship, and the clever inventor is a magical enchanter, and the living golem isn’t mechanical at all, but has living wood that acts like muscle and bone, and either a soul or something like enough to it that they can be magically resurrected.

Those differences are absolutely vital to understanding the setting. Full stop.



Anybody I pull off the street will immediately understand the difference, and their initial thought that this is some sort of magically animated mechanical creature will be successfully corrected, once I explain that it is in fact not a robot, but a sentient golem made of living wood and stone. I might have to explain what a golem is, because most people don’t actually know the term in any context, but that’s the main potential confusion.
If you wouldn't call it magitech or steam punk what would you call it?
 

gyor

Adventurer
Ya know...the timing for this test would also work very, very well for the Rick & Morty boxed set. And the potential zaniness is a real fit there.

Those evil bastards, will i have to buy this box???
The Barbarian is zany, the monk is more serious. So I don't think its Rick and Morty.

Both share a theme that R&M are unlikely to display, planar.
 
Lots of people in this thread just really hate new ideas, don't they? Shame on WotC for trying to get us beyond the days of angry barbarians and simple fighters! Damn everything new, everything creative, everything to push Fantasy somewhere further beyond!
 

Gradine

Archivist
The Barbarian is zany, the monk is more serious. So I don't think its Rick and Morty.

Both share a theme that R&M are unlikely to display, planar.
The Monk is basically Azura's Wrath, which is the zaniest self serious game ever.

I also very much assumed the Rick and Morty game would involve planes
 

RSIxidor

Explorer
Isn't R&M always teleporting to other planets or universes or something like that? All my R&M knowledge comes from playing the VR game, and it definitely had some of that.
 

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