Unearthed Arcana: Barbarian and Monk

Russ Morrissey

Comments

TwoSix

Lover of things you hate
I mean, my parents taught me how to swim! They did it the old-fashioned way, too. Just tossed me in the river, knowing that I would figure it out.

It wasn't that hard, either, once I got out of the bag.
My dad was old-fashioned, too, one of those guys who didn't believe in book learning. The best way to learn was to learn by doing.

That's why when I was 6, he just tossed me in the swimming pool; so he could learn CPR.
 

lowkey13

I'm sorry, Dave. I'm afraid I can't do that.
My dad was old-fashioned, too, one of those guys who didn't believe in book learning. The best way to learn was to learn by doing.

That's why when I was 6, he just tossed me in the swimming pool; so he could learn CPR.
You got to learn yer kids gud.

That's why my Uncle Goober used to dangle me out of the third-story window by my ankle; didn't want me fooling with no heights.
 
Ignore him, lowkey13 has become so consumed by his hatred of Paladins and all things "new school" that he should have by now collapsed into a singularity of pure salt and skub dealing 10d8 psychic damage to everybody within 120 feet of him plus an additional 10d8 necrotic to Paladins, Tieflings, and Dragonborn.
ENWorld was better when it was without shtick.
 
The 3rd level benefit on the monk seems like a lot. Wisdom to attack, radiant damage, reach and it's monk weapon so extra attacks and flurry of blows. Uses up all your ki at early levels but it's a lot. By the time you get to 11th and get more big buffs, you can be using it multiple times per fight with no problem.
 

RSIxidor

Explorer
The 3rd level benefit on the monk seems like a lot. Wisdom to attack, radiant damage, reach and it's monk weapon so extra attacks and flurry of blows. Uses up all your ki at early levels but it's a lot. By the time you get to 11th and get more big buffs, you can be using it multiple times per fight with no problem.
The Wisdom to attack isn't that important, because you can still use Strength or Dexterity without having to focus on Wisdom. Though you probably have invested some in Wisdom as a Monk, you probably didn't invest in at as your primary stat. The Wisdom in place of Strength checks and saves is more interesting, I think. That allows for a Monk that focused on Dexterity to somewhat more reliably use more interesting tactics in combat, such as grappling and shoving, alongside making the spectral arm attacks, if they pumped Wisdom up a bit. Depending on how exactly the arms work, they might even be able to grapple or shove at 10' reach.

EDIT: Radiant is nice but Way of the Sun Soul also gets radiant with a 30' ranged weapon at 3 and doesn't seem to be that significant. This being melee, at least don't have to worry about provoking.
 
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doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
An aweful lot of fantasy stories feature worlds with "fated heroes" and the like.... I mean the entire prophecy schtick and so on... witches telling you your fortune. Myth and legend certainly has a ton of room for different stories are you really saying the flavor text of a couple monster types out of that many... undermine that much.
Not at all. DnD assumes a teleological world with free will. When a witch tells your fortune, she is seeing the future, not determining it. Determinism isn't a necessary conclusion from the premise that the future can be seen, it's just one possible conclusion.
Further, that future can be changed.

Eberron is pseudo-1928 (10 years after the great war). By 1928 gas lighting was being replaced by electricity.
No, it's not. Eberron is a mix of post-100yrs War, post-Seven Years War, and industrial revolution, with some fairly light early 20th century elements.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
Magipunk is going to have people comparing it to Shadowrun. I'll look into this Gas Lamp Fantasy.
Good. They should do that. It owes a lot of cyberpunk.

Warforged are closer to the idea of post-human synthetic people than to steampunk automotons, and the Houses are very much cyberpunk megacorps. Combine that with the fact that both draw upon noir detective stories, and a noir focused Eberron game is very similar to fantasy cyberpunk.

Then, if you focus on pulp adventure instead, it gets closer to psuedo-victorian fantasy pulp.

Either way, it retains all the other elements that make it unique and distinct from any of those things.
 

Paul Farquhar

Adventurer
The Wisdom to attack isn't that important, because you can still use Strength or Dexterity without having to focus on Wisdom. Though you probably have invested some in Wisdom as a Monk, you probably didn't invest in at as your primary stat. The Wisdom in place of Strength checks and saves is more interesting, I think. That allows for a Monk that focused on Dexterity to somewhat more reliably use more interesting tactics in combat, such as grappling and shoving, alongside making the spectral arm attacks, if they pumped Wisdom up a bit. Depending on how exactly the arms work, they might even be able to grapple or shove at 10' reach.

EDIT: Radiant is nice but Way of the Sun Soul also gets radiant with a 30' ranged weapon at 3 and doesn't seem to be that significant. This being melee, at least don't have to worry about provoking.
It means you can focus your ASIs on increasing wisdom first, rather than dex. Mechanically you are still probably slightly better off as a dex monk, but thematically a wisdom monk is desirable, and it works well for races that get a bonus to wisdom but not dex (e.g. dwarf, firbolg, aasimar, githzeri, tortle, loxodon).

It does mean at low level you are likely to find your combat power severely diminished when your ki runs out.
 

Paul Farquhar

Adventurer
No, it's not. Eberron is a mix of post-100yrs War, post-Seven Years War, and industrial revolution, with some fairly light early 20th century elements.
They didn't have railways or street lighting post-100yrs War or post-Seven Years War (Post-100yrs war is pretty much standard D&D). They didn't have commercial air travel in the industrial revolution. Tech-wise Eberron is firmly in the early 20th Century. If you look at the period of commercial airships, that puts Eberron firmly between 1920 and 1940. Which is also, not coincidently, the period of the pulp adventure novel.

It's quite different politically of course.
 

landylee

Villager
Yeah, quite a bit of wackiness in that Wild Soul Barb.
Two of the best, IMO:
  • ally gains a spell slot basde on a d4 then the Barbarian takes force damage equal to five times the number rolled
  • magic surge summons exploding intangible spirits that look like flumphs!
Yeah, it's so complicated!
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
They didn't have railways or street lighting post-100yrs War or post-Seven Years War (Post-100yrs war is pretty much standard D&D). They didn't have commercial air travel in the industrial revolution. Tech-wise Eberron is firmly in the early 20th Century. If you look at the period of commercial airships, that puts Eberron firmly between 1920 and 1940. Which is also, not coincidently, the period of the pulp adventure novel.

It's quite different politically of course.
It has predominantly kings and nobles, and airships are a big part of nearly all fantastical/anacronistic industrial revolution depictions. It's...damn near universal.

Politically, it's nothing like the 1920s or 30s, and a great deal like the early to mid 1800s in some places, more like the mid 15th in others.

Politics is much more important than what tech exists. People don't live like the 1920's in Eberron. There aren't tractors. Nothing like cars are commonplace. Sending stations are vastly more like telegraph services than even early telephones. Teleportation never existed in the real world, but it's an expensive luxury form of travel in Eberron, like chartering a fancy private jet. Trains and steam power in general, and thus machine automation, existed during the industrial revolution, as did the telegraph.

The point being, Eberron is not psuedo-any given decade. It's it's own thing, that has as much industrial revolutions and post-7 years war elements as it does turn of the 20th century elements.
 

Parmandur

Legend
They didn't have railways or street lighting post-100yrs War or post-Seven Years War (Post-100yrs war is pretty much standard D&D). They didn't have commercial air travel in the industrial revolution. Tech-wise Eberron is firmly in the early 20th Century. If you look at the period of commercial airships, that puts Eberron firmly between 1920 and 1940. Which is also, not coincidently, the period of the pulp adventure novel.

It's quite different politically of course.
I mean, it is different, but the threat of a World War 2 equivalent hangs overhead in Eberron, too. Maybe with Cthulu, Dragons and a Warforged Soviet empire if the Lord of Blades gets his way. Very interbellum vibe.
 

Parmandur

Legend
It has predominantly kings and nobles, and airships are a big part of nearly all fantastical/anacronistic industrial revolution depictions. It's...damn near universal.

Politically, it's nothing like the 1920s or 30s, and a great deal like the early to mid 1800s in some places, more like the mid 15th in others.

Politics is much more important than what tech exists. People don't live like the 1920's in Eberron. There aren't tractors. Nothing like cars are commonplace. Sending stations are vastly more like telegraph services than even early telephones. Teleportation never existed in the real world, but it's an expensive luxury form of travel in Eberron, like chartering a fancy private jet. Trains and steam power in general, and thus machine automation, existed during the industrial revolution, as did the telegraph.

The point being, Eberron is not psuedo-any given decade. It's it's own thing, that has as much industrial revolutions and post-7 years war elements as it does turn of the 20th century elements.
It actually seems a blend of different eras that specifically aren't usually done by D&D.
 

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