log in or register to remove this ad

 

D&D 5E Van Richten's Guide to Ravenloft Art Preview

SageAdvice.eu has compiled a bunch of art shots from the upcoming Ravenloft setting book. I've featured a handful below, but click through to the link for the full set of nearly 30 pieces.

ART-Van-Richtens-Guide-to-Ravenloft0.jpeg

2.jpeg

3.jpeg

4.jpeg

6.jpeg

7.jpeg


 

log in or register to remove this ad

Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey


log in or register to remove this ad



Dire Bare

Legend
Supporter
Dont think thats Strahd, notice the ears. Has to be Elvish or Half-Elf.
Pointy ears aren't a signifier of elven ancestry, they are a signifier of being not fully human.

Vampires, and Strahd in particular, have been depicted with pointy ears in D&D art for decades, although not consistently.
 





Aaron L

Hero
I like the variety here! One thing I've always enjoyed about Ravenloft is how it really spans the horror genres- you've got mad scientists and headless horsemen and dark fey and vampires... Fun stuff!
Not to mention the Lovecraftian eldritch alien horror of Bluetspur!

There was a short Ravenloft story written by Mouseferatu several years ago, about a survivor who just barely make it out of Bluetspur, only to find that he didn't make it quite as far as he had believed. It was really, really good and written in Lovecraftian style. I keep a copy on my computer, it was so good.
 

Aaron L

Hero
So, tiefling horns come off the front of their head, while hexblood horns come off the back?

I much, much, much prefer the way Tieflings were originally portrayed, as unique individual descendants of fiendish ancestors, each with their own unique individual deformity.

Seeing as how the idea behind Tieflings came from the Medieval idea that birth deformities were caused by the sins of the child's parents and/or ancestors, it makes a whole Hell of a lot more sense that they would each have unique deformities, rather than being a full race of uniformly red-skinned, goat-horned, and lizard-tailed Devilpeople. I just cannot stand that massive alteration. It just makes them... flatter and less interesting.
 


Tonguez

A suffusion of yellow
It looks to me that his he is reaching his hand out toward the viewer, palm up, so I think it's just weird perspective/foreshortening.
yeah I initially thought missing arm, but rechecked and he is holding his hand up against his body, cant see anything like an elbow which is where the perspective goes askew.

I had assumed that was a picture of The Machine and he might be a ghost
 

The pointed ears are signs of wisdow and a long life. In Spain there is a tradition of pulling the ears of the children in their birthday.

The old canon said Strand had got pointed ears.

If Azalin comes back then his curse has to be different. We have to remember he is a very important character in the event of the grand condjuction.

* A new dread domain based in Eberron? It is possible, maybe something linked with machines that rebels against the humans.

* The hexborn hasn't got horns, but he wears something like an altlered crown.
 




Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
I much, much, much prefer the way Tieflings were originally portrayed, as unique individual descendants of fiendish ancestors, each with their own unique individual deformity.

Seeing as how the idea behind Tieflings came from the Medieval idea that birth deformities were caused by the sins of the child's parents and/or ancestors, it makes a whole Hell of a lot more sense that they would each have unique deformities, rather than being a full race of uniformly red-skinned, goat-horned, and lizard-tailed Devilpeople. I just cannot stand that massive alteration. It just makes them... flatter and less interesting.
This is pretty far afield of the topic, but Tieflings weren’t just chanted to “a full race of uniformly red-skinned, goat-horned, and lizard-tailed Devilpeople.” The change was first introduced in 4e, and it was specific to 4e’s assumed setting, commonly referred to as Nentir Vale. In that setting, there was an ancient empire called Bael Turath, who’s (human) nobility made a pact with Asmodeus to maintain control over their empire. As a result of this pact, all of their descendants were cursed to bear a devilish visage as mark of their forebears’ sin. The Tieflings of the Nentir Vale setting aren’t even a race as the word is typically used in D&D, they’re a cursed bloodline of humans.

Now, 5e moved away from the 4e assumed setting, so there’s no Bael Turath and no cursed bloodline, but for some reason they kept the appearance of 4e Tieflings despite not keeping the lore behind them. So, I agree that in the context of 5e where Tieflings are back to being people with fiendish heritage, the uniform appearance doesn’t make sense. But it did make sense in the context of their 4e lore, which is where the uniform appearance originated from.
 

There's some beautiful work there. The Jiangshi one is gorgeous, as is the first one with all the ghosts. That's got to be the House on Gryphon Hill, right? The golem workshop, and the one with the wererats, and the mummy's tomb piece are really nice too. The third last one I assume is the new female Falkovnia darklord - lots of zombies, eagle motif? Can't say i'm a fan of the Azalin/Strahd one, admittedly. A bit too 'cover of an early-90s Warhammer supplement' for me

They really seem to be heavily going for the gothic style of clothing and equipment. Prominent guns, very little armour, lots of waistcoats and monocles in the place of tabards, shields, and plate helms. I wonder if there'll be new equipment rules to reflect that, or whether PCs will largely end up wearing the heaviest armour they can manage as happens in most D&D games?
 



Visit Our Sponsor

Latest threads

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top