Vecna: Eve of Ruin

D&D 5E Vecna: Eve of Ruin Coming May 21st!

Necropolitan

Adventurer
What I like about Vecna as a villainous god is that he doesn't do what gods usually do (attempt to spread their faith, eliminate their enemies, etc.) in the usual way, instead he tries to directly seize more power.

He's a god, but he's still acting like a mortal with godly powers and even though he's had setbacks it's overall worked for him.
 

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Kurotowa

Legend
What I like about Vecna as a villainous god is that he doesn't do what gods usually do (attempt to spread their faith, eliminate their enemies, etc.) in the usual way, instead he tries to directly seize more power.

He's a god, but he's still acting like a mortal with godly powers and even though he's had setbacks it's overall worked for him.
A very good point. Vecna isn't trying to play the games of divinity because he doesn't care about winning. As far as he's concerned, godhood is just a stepping stone to even higher plateaus. To stop his ascent and act as just another god would be settling for second place.
 



teitan

Legend
I think Rifts was called the "Megaverse"
The multiverse came from science and was attached to fantasy and sci-Fi for decades. DC had infinite earths, Alan Moore introduced it to Marvel in Captain Britain, Star Trek had mirror universe and multiple histories that reconcile as a multiverse. These all predate Palladium and it’s not really something they sue over. Heck, D&D had the planes.

If anyone should sue it’s Michael Moorcock.
 

Reynard

Legend
The multiverse came from science and was attached to fantasy and sci-Fi for decades. DC had infinite earths, Alan Moore introduced it to Marvel in Captain Britain, Star Trek had mirror universe and multiple histories that reconcile as a multiverse. These all predate Palladium and it’s not really something they sue over. Heck, D&D had the planes.

If anyone should sue it’s Michael Moorcock.
When did D&D start using the term "multiverse" in its marketing, specifically?

Show me an ad or other marketing material that used "multiverse" before the MCU repopularized the term with broader audiences.
 

The multiverse came from science and was attached to fantasy and sci-Fi for decades. DC had infinite earths, Alan Moore introduced it to Marvel in Captain Britain, Star Trek had mirror universe and multiple histories that reconcile as a multiverse. These all predate Palladium and it’s not really something they sue over. Heck, D&D had the planes.

If anyone should sue it’s Michael Moorcock.

Honestly Ancient Religions and Philosphy had various idea of Multiverses hundreds if not thousands of years before that.
 

When did D&D start using the term "multiverse" in its marketing, specifically?

Show me an ad or other marketing material that used "multiverse" before the MCU repopularized the term with broader audiences.
Without checking anything prior to 5e, the PHB

And I am pretty sure Marvel movies were not doing multiverse stuff in 2014.
 
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Obviously we don't have a lot of details yet, but what we do know very much points to this module as being the culmination of the first decade of 5E, adventure and setting wise. It's possible they just forgot to mention the Dale Lands, or Kara-Tur, or Dark Sun, or Mystara, but the list of settings we will be visiting IS the list of 5E settings.

Well except for the MtG settings.
 


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