D&D (2024) What creatures from existing sources besides MM, do you want to see updated for MM24?

Well since it seems like there won't be some bonus monsters for the recent Planescape setting, I want some of the holes filled for planar creatures. And I realize it mostly comes down to Celestials (since I think all Fiends from 2e are covered now in 5e), and it would be a bunch that aren't too obscure in that they've been in the 3e MM before (as much I would want there to be the other Rilmani).

So they would be:
Trumpet Archon
Monadic Deva
Movanic Deva
(the MM Deva is the Astral Deva)
Leonal Guardinal
Bralani Eladrin (or whatever they're calling the CG celestials)
Ghaele Eladrin
Lillendi (they could group them into the main CG celestials like Pathfinder did with it's Eladrin equivalent the "Azata")
 

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Judging by Monsters of the Multiverse, I don't think we are going to see huge changes to any of the MM creatures, so I'm not really worried about anything getting updated; we'll be able to use the current versions just fine. What I would like to see is some new variations on some of these creatures.

I could see a Tartarus version of Empyreans that are fiends instead of Celestials, maybe even Greater Titans.
 

Yaarel

He Mage
I've been thinking Feywild and Shadowfell are going to rejoin the Elemental Planes as the positive/negative planes, effectively making them the elemental planes of life/wood and rot we had pre-4e.

Makes sense for druids-powered-by-inner-planes.

YMMV
Good point about the D&D tradition of Positive Energy and Negative [Void] behaving as if Elements within the Inner Planes.

The Void is actually absolute nothingness, the empty space in which Positive Energy can lump into particles, then atoms, then molecules, then "things". In the Shadowfell, things fray, rot and disintegrate into nothingness. Vampirism is parasitically siphoning Positive Energy from elsewhere to persist within the Void.

Note, "Ether" is the "Fifth Element". This "elemental" phenomenon is physical but immaterial, such as gravity having no matter but physically pulling material objects. The Four Elements are states of matter.

I see seven Elemental units.
• Positive (Light)
• Negative (Darkness)
• Ether (Force)
• Fire (Plasma)
• Air (Gas)
• Water (Liquid)
• Earth (Solid)


Each of these seven elements has an Inner Plane.
• Positive: Fey (Feywild)
• Negative: Undead (Shadowfell)
• Ether: Ethereal
• Fire
• Air
• Water
• Earth


The Material Plane is the confluence of all of these Inner Planes, and via the conscious minds of Humanoids, the Astral Outer Planes as well.

Primal magic, including that of Druids, might associate with any of these seven "elements" − including Fey and Undead − but especially how these entangle the Material Plane. Primal magic is the magic of the Material Plane.
 


Yaarel

He Mage
Aether is supposed to be the material that the heavens is made up of, separate and distinct from the base, worldly elements. If you really want to translate it from classic greek elements to D&D cosmology, aether would be the substances the Astral and the Outer Planes are made up of, which is distinct, separate and opposite of the Inner Planes.

A second option for translating aether to D&D would be "arcane" spells such as magic missile - spells made up of "magic force." Though I personally would associate it with Earth than its own element or state of matter, I find that I'm in the minority when it comes to pop culture's take on the matter.

Also, of note is that poison spray is now a necromantic cantrip, which seems to me to suggest that elemental poison is going to be associated with the negative plane (/shadowfell in my suggested cosmology).
Yeah. Ether [αιθηρ] is originally the "upper atmosphere" high above the clouds. By contrast, the Air [αηρ] is the "lower atmosphere" below and including the clouds, and can translate literally as "haze".

As Hellenism (the mixture of Greek and nearby cultures, especially Egypt and Babylonian) began to explore elemental units of matter, eventually the Four Elements of matter emerge − Fire, Air, Water, and Earth. Then the Ether functioned as the Fifth Element, as the "eternal" element beyond these four temporal elements. Traditions about what Ether is differ drastically, including the concepts of spirit, soul, energy, and space. In all of these traditions of Ether, the Four Elements are understood to emerge from the Fifth and to interact with each other within it.

By the Medieval Period, such as during the 1100s, a surprisingly modern explanation for Ether also emerged among the other explanations. Here, Ether was understood to have properties of both Fire and Water, and yet to be neither, reminiscent of particle-waves. Even more significantly, Ether was identified as a "force" that is invisible, yet physical and while strictly lacking matter is able to keep the celestial objects in orbit. In other words: Ether is gravity. In this same view about Ether as force, the Four Elements were understood to be states of matter: solid, liquid, gas, plus plasma being "the fire of the heavens" or "the fire that burns fire". The sun, stars, and lightning were understood to be made out of the Heavenly Fire, which is nonidentical with ordinary flames. These states of matter arent particles in themselves, but rather the "forms" that any kind of particles of matter might take. Ordinary water can become Earthy ice, Watery water, and Airy steam, and likewise metals like gold and mercury can. The Four Elements are states of matter.


In a D&D context, the Fifth Element of Ether already exists as the stuff of the Ethereal Plane. It is Force.

Meanwhile the D&D "soul" is a microcosm of every plane in the multiverse. It includes the physical body of animal life, being made out of matter, as well as the spirit of a person that can exert influence ethereally, telekinetically, such as disembodied ghosts do, and also encompasses the mindscapes of the thought stuff of the Aster of the Outer Planes including the Astral Plane.

Meanwhile all Force damage, Force effects such as telekinesis, and Force constructs that are physically quasimaterial but actually immaterial, are all made out of Ether, the same stuff that gravity is made out of. Using gravity-like Force to squeeze someones heart or choke someone or cause brain aneurysms, are normal examples of what Force damage is. Note, because a Force construct simulates the shapes of matter, it can also deal Weapon damage: Bludgeon, Pierce, and Slash.


In the context of the Poison Spray cantrip, to classify it as Necromantic requires clarification. I suspect what they are trying to convey is using Poison damage as a way to express damage from a "disease", in the sense of anti-life and rot. If Poison can mean "disease" as well as "toxin", then the description of Poison damage in the Glossary in the 2024 Players Handbook needs to make this clear. It makes enough sense for Necromantic to include disease tropes. Consider how much of the gothic horror vampire imagery comes from the symptoms of "consumption", tuberculosis.
 
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Whizbang Dustyboots

Gnometown Hero
There are a bunch of generic monsters in various adventures that weren't in Monsters of the Multiverse, like the Sea Lion. They should make the jump to the Monster Manual.

If WotC needs to pad things out more, I would rather they make more variants of existing monsters (more types of goblins, more types of orcs, more types of giants of each type, etc.), similar to @Nixlord's excellent Monster Manual Expanded series, than to give me a bunch of weirdos I won't use.

I will absolutely use, say, a kobold sniper, probably quite often. I am unlikely to ever use an adherer or many of the colorful weirdos from the Fiend Folio.

The primary job of D&D books, especially the core books, should be table utility.

Books that exist largely as an object to be read but not played should be saved for supplements or works like novels or art books.
 

Whizbang Dustyboots

Gnometown Hero
I've been thinking Feywild and Shadowfell are going to rejoin the Elemental Planes as the positive/negative planes, effectively making them the elemental planes of life/wood and rot we had pre-4e.
What now?

The only time I recall an elemental plane of wood was a variant plane in the 3E Manual of the Planes. To my knowledge, it's never been part of the core cosmology. That's not to say it's a bad idea -- it's much better than the planes of "you burn up if you go to this one, and you die in a vacuum if you go to that one" -- but it would not be a return to a previous norm.
 

Mephista

Adventurer
What now?

The only time I recall an elemental plane of wood was a variant plane in the 3E Manual of the Planes. To my knowledge, it's never been part of the core cosmology. That's not to say it's a bad idea -- it's much better than the planes of "you burn up if you go to this one, and you die in a vacuum if you go to that one" -- but it would not be a return to a previous norm.
The lack of commas in my writing has caused confusion, I see. Apologies. We've never had something called the Plane of Wood, but both feywild and plane of positive energy have been about rapid growth of plants as an aspect. Hense, the "plane of wood element" to fit real world elemental models.
 

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