What is your earliest and most impressionable childhood memory of reading the original D&D or other games


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Yora

Legend
Also the Moldvay basic art for me too. I think the Kobold stood out most. They were the centerpiece creature to the first "module" I wrote myself.

View attachment 149408
That kobold is pretty interesting. But what about this?

2c3baaace9acfd3ed656689b483b0047.jpg

When I first read the Basic rules seven years ago, it was this image on the first page that had me hooked way more than the more famous cover art. Most of the illustration in the B/X rules are really good.
 

Cadence

Legend
Supporter
That kobold is pretty interesting. But what about this?

2c3baaace9acfd3ed656689b483b0047.jpg

When I first read the Basic rules seven years ago, it was this image on the first page that had me hooked way more than the more famous cover art. Most of the illustration in the B/X rules are really good.
I think that's the one that stands out most when I'm looking at the book (it is spectacular!)... but for some reason it doesn't stick in my memory.
 


I first read the Blue cover basic rules in 1979; I was in college at the time. As a long-time wargamer, I had a great deal of trouble getting past 'what are the victory conditions'.
 

My first WOW!!! moment with D&D was actually having D&D described and being told about the Cavalier class, must have been 1989 - I even remember where I was, on a particular bit of lawn outside St. Paul's Cathedral in bright sunlight, and who told me. I was just blown away by the concept and it sounded incredibly exciting.

A few weeks or months later we got AD&D 2E.

Then I wasn't actually blown away by of the writing or description in the PHB/DMG or ring-binder MC, but Forgotten Realm Adventures. The book which outlined the FR for new players, and updated it for old ones. That was amazing, and hypnotic, especially the incredibly evocative cover (a woman in bronze-looking armour on a unicorn in front of a mysterious tower).

And what got me even harder was, as people here can probably guess because I go on about it to this, Taladas - the Time of the Dragon boxed set. I was absolutely obsessed with everything in Time of the Dragon.

A lot of RPG stuff just burned itself into my soul in the next few years after that, but those are the earliest ones.
 



MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
Also the Moldvay basic art for me too. I think the Kobold stood out most. They were the centerpiece creature to the first "module" I wrote myself.

View attachment 149408
As a bit of an amateur herpetologist since I was a kid, I was always annoyed by showing kobolds, lizard-men, and other reptilian or amphibian peoples with loin cloths and nipples.
 

Cadence

Legend
Supporter
As a bit of an amateur herpetologist since I was a kid, I was always annoyed by showing kobolds, lizard-men, and other reptilian or amphibian peoples with loin cloths and nipples.

In basic anyway, the Kobold's were never said to be reptilian (which throws me off still in some other editions):
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One of the other pictures I always liked gets to the herpetology though...
1641483877737.png
 

Voadam

Legend

Cadence

Legend
Supporter
There is the scaly skin and the art for them is both dog like in the face and reptilian with the skin and the crest ridges.

Pangolians and paranthropus aethiopicus?

I think I've been recently describing them as "lizardy dog-folk". In a world with Thouls, Chimera, and Owlbears, anything is possible! :)
 

Voadam

Legend
Pangolians and paranthropus aethiopicus?
Good calls!

Those work as justifications for that interpretation, but not my first thought of references when looking at the kobold art and description. My understanding is that the sagittal crest of mammals is usually just an anchor for attaching powerful jaw muscles and so I would think aethiopicus would look more like an ape's round head than a spiked mini-mohawk which I would generally associate with a reptile or dinosaur or such.

Generally room for a lot of individual variations on what works for us and what don't.

I think I've been recently describing them as "lizardy dog-folk". In a world with Thouls, Chimera, and Owlbears, anything is possible! :)
Thouls. Hybrid ghoul troll hobgoblins who are not explicitly undead and the result of an 0D&D encounter chart typo expanded into its own thing. One of the B/X monsters that did not really work for me.
 


Mannahnin

Scion of Murgen
Reading the classic Red Box, going through introductory adventure repeatedly, both utterly captivated by it and seeking an ending where Aleena didn't get fridged. I would've been nine years old at the time.

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This for me too.

Plus playing the sample adventure run by my dad, and my first PC, Raven, a crossbow-wielding Elf, first Sleeping the Kobolds in the courtyard, then dying to a poisoned needle on a box in a closet. :ROFLMAO:
 



The Black Box was my introduction. It was a really great teaching edition, and included little paper minis and a fold out map of a dungeon.

That linked post describes the "dragon cards" which worked to teach wee DMs like myself the game:

The dragon cards is what sets this box apart as an introductory set. Each card explains an aspect of the game and then the rules. Each card covers everything from 'what is an rpg'. 'what is a DM' to 'what is a reaction roll', 'what is armor class' and 'what is a saving throw'.

Then you turn the card over to the other side where there is an unfolding play sequence (the "escape from Zanzer's dungeon") from card to card that shows you how it is actually used in the game. It starts out as a solo sequence with the map, then as you get the hang of it tells you to get some friends together and play the escape as a group.
 

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