D&D General What rule do you hate most from any edition? (+ Thread)


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MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
It's a bigger fantasy to me than anything else in D&D...I think it was written by the Bookworms dreaming that they are just as good at combat as a Navy Seal or something.

Well, duh. :)

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Werehamster

Villager
While there’s some verisimilitude issues here it’s 6 of one, half dozen of the other issue. Players have more healing, DM deals more damage. Same with death saves, you keep them on the edge of their seats for survival regardless right? With death saves you can knock them to 0 HP every week, w/o you don’t kill them every week. Everyone has their style, so whatever you like, but these type of things can be balanced out easily.
I agree with all of what you're saying. I think there's also a bit of culture shock because I hadn't DMed since AD&D 15 years ago. 3E and 3.5E had come out, but because our group had invested so much money into AD&D we just stuck with it. So that had a lot to do with my reaction to seeing it. I actually like death saves to be honest. It adds some action and "thrill of victory, agony of defeat" theater while they are out of the action.
 


the Jester

Legend
Early edition energy drain is a huge one.

In 5e, I hate the way the lineage system is stripping out so much of what makes different races different. Also, I hate that clone lets you come back young- the pursuit of immortality should be a major campaign-long quest for those who want it. There's a reason some people choose undeath- it's the only way they can survive past their normal span. Potions of longevity should matter and be valued.
 




Cadence

Legend
Supporter
but why do we need to be 3rd or 8th level? why not just a master chief?
Because that's how NPCs roll in 3/3.5/PF. Why would the book have 20th level commoners in it if they weren't a thing?

"Holy cats! Did you see that lone peasant (52hp, BAB +10/+5) take on that young knight? How did they become that skilled?"
"They took their farming very seriously and are the best at it in the world! You should see the retired master Blacksmith over in the next kingdom!"
 

billd91

Hobbit on Quest (he/him)
Because that's how NPCs roll in 3/3.5/PF. Why would the book have 20th level commoners in it if they weren't a thing?

"Holy cats! Did you see that lone peasant (52hp, BAB +10/+5) take on that young knight? How did they become that skilled?"
"They took their farming very seriously and are the best at it in the world! You should see the retired master Blacksmith over in the next kingdom!"
See, I actually really like the NPC classes. The grizzled local could actually put up a bar fight without having to have been a retired adventurer or be a 0-level nobody. They probably just didn't really need to go to level 20. But level 10? Sure. Reasonably good way to stat out formidable Farmer Maggot from Fellowship of the Ring.
In any event, it was a worthy transitional step from 0-level NPCs as the norm to NPC stats built to suit the situation in later editions.
 

3.0 psionics based on physical ability scores. I'll just metamorphose into something scary and now nothing can stop my Disintegrate power. On the other side of the power scale, needing one ability score per discipline (other classes didn't have that problem).

Psionic combat was also badly designed, but wouldn't come up if you were the only psychic around, so it's not quite as bad.
 

Cadence

Legend
Supporter
See, I actually really like the NPC classes. The grizzled local could actually put up a bar fight without having to have been a retired adventurer or be a 0-level nobody. They probably just didn't really need to go to level 20. But level 10? Sure. Reasonably good way to stat out formidable Farmer Maggot from Fellowship of the Ring.
In any event, it was a worthy transitional step from 0-level NPCs as the norm to NPC stats built to suit the situation in later editions.
I just want to know what level goes with a 30 years of experience (and some vague level of success) in my field so I can see how tough I should act at the next in person happy hour! :)
 




Oh, I forgot about those! I like the way they work mechanically, but I could do with better classes. I was creating some traps for an OSE adventure recently, and I’m like: what makes sense for reflexively avoiding a falling portcullis trap? 🙃
Um, portcullis falls you die, roll a new character :ROFLMAO:

I think save vs death is cool, just as a luck mechanic. I think the names of the saves are evocative and communicate what the game is going to be about (your character will face the dangers of dragon breath, spells, petrification, and death). But this is one area where I would love to see a deep dive on how an OS mechanic affects/improves gameplay in a way that is not immediately obvious. I suppose it gives demi-humans an advantage to balance out level restrictions.
 

3.0/3.5: BAB. I always thought it was a bit of a pain to calculate. And the whole getting less and less accurate is a pain too. I'll admit, I've been spoiled by 5E's Extra Attack, but still.

Oh yeah Cross Skills suck. Pathfinder 1 did it the best and I would totally jack it as a house rule to use it in 3.0/3.5 if I was DMing it.
 


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