D&D 5E Where does Next fit in terms of RPG ecology?

adamc

First Post
"RPG ecology" is not a perfect term. What I'm getting at is where does it seem likely to fit amongst all the competitors? If 4e is the game that you play when you like the combat grid and are hyper about game balance, and 3.5e/Pathfinder the game when you like having lots of options to manipulate, what will be the core appeal of 5e?

(Not trying to describe 4e or pathfinder above, just trying to give examples of what I mean.)

I guess I am assuming that most folks don't really think it is all things to all people.
 

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Scrivener of Doom

Adventurer
Advanced Dungeons & Dragons Third Edition.

That's essentially what Next is which means, generally speaking, that it's a simpler version of D&D (compared to 3.xE and 4E) that could have been designed in 1999, although there are a few modern (3.xE- and 4E-inspired) touches.

If you want an older school and thus rules-lighter (not necessarily rules light, but YMMV) then Next is for you. If you want a slightly updated version of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons that you can use to run old school AD&D adventures with minimal modification then Next is for you. (Personally speaking, I think this is the only attraction of the game.)
 

Libramarian

Adventurer
The game you play when you want to play the current edition of D&D. DDN will be the cheap chain restaurant pizza of the RPG world. Nobody will think it's great, but most people will think it's good enough.

Advanced Dungeons & Dragons Third Edition.

That's essentially what Next is which means, generally speaking, that it's a simpler version of D&D (compared to 3.xE and 4E) that could have been designed in 1999, although there are a few modern (3.xE- and 4E-inspired) touches.

If you want an older school and thus rules-lighter (not necessarily rules light, but YMMV) then Next is for you. If you want a slightly updated version of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons that you can use to run old school AD&D adventures with minimal modification then Next is for you. (Personally speaking, I think this is the only attraction of the game.)
I think you're overstating the similarity between Next and AD&D. I can't imagine this game being designed in 1999 without the influence of 3e and 4e. That would represent a huge and bizarre leap away from 2e.

I've heard some people praise how easy it is to convert old modules to Next, but I don't see why--you can't use...literally any of the game stats on the page. You would have to substitute Next's version of monsters, treasure, XP, damage. So I don't see how it's any easier to convert them to Next than almost any other RPG with the same fantasy adventure game assumptions. I guess the idea is that the relative balance of monsters/treasure and PCs is more AD&Dish in Next than 3e or 4e? So if the module says that a room has 11 Orcs in it, you can use 11 Next Orcs instead of creating a different encounter?

I can already think of one case where that's definitely not true: in old AD&D modules Rings of Invisibility are pretty common, but in Next they're a Legendary item.
 


Scrivener of Doom

Adventurer
(snip) I think you're overstating the similarity between Next and AD&D. I can't imagine this game being designed in 1999 without the influence of 3e and 4e. That would represent a huge and bizarre leap away from 2e. (snip)

... which is why I mentioned 3.xE- and 4E-inspired touches.

It's AD&D in the sense that it is a simpler, gridless game that seems to be planning to tread out the 2E route of using later supplements to add in the interesting bits.

(snip) I've heard some people praise how easy it is to convert old modules to Next, but I don't see why--you can't use...literally any of the game stats on the page. You would have to substitute Next's version of monsters, treasure, XP, damage. So I don't see how it's any easier to convert them to Next than almost any other RPG with the same fantasy adventure game assumptions. I guess the idea is that the relative balance of monsters/treasure and PCs is more AD&Dish in Next than 3e or 4e? So if the module says that a room has 11 Orcs in it, you can use 11 Next Orcs instead of creating a different encounter? (snip)

Yes, that is why it easier to convert.

The game plays very similarly to AD&D which makes the conversion work easier because you're not having to rebalance the encounter as you would have to do in 3.xE and 4E.
 

tuxgeo

Adventurer
Where does it fit? "On the plains," of course -- because it is turning out to be a rather "plain" version of the game. :cool:

(Watch out for the stampeding bison, yo.)
 

Zardnaar

Legend
I have been playtesting D&D while playing 2nd ed after a 12 year hiatus on 3.x. About the only thing it has in common with pre 3rd ed is that combats are faster and there is no grid or skill system,. It also doesn't convert older adventures that well except for low level ones. Mud Sorcerers Tomb (level 15) being horrible.

It is a d20 game through and through and if anything it is kind of a dumbed down 3.x married up with essentials. Note that could actually be a good thing IDK and YMMV of course.
 

dd.stevenson

Super KY
where does it seem likely to fit amongst all the competitors?
In terms of contemporary sales volume, I think 5E will have only one competitor--Pathfinder.

In this case, 5E's advantages are probably obvious: easier to grok, more balanced, remains manageable at high levels, and quicker to play. If we're taking winks and nods at face value, then I would also add that there will be a greater variety of settings, compared to Pathfinder's Golarion.

On the other hand, it looks like 5E will have fewer player customization options and probably not be OGL. Initial experiences indicate worse adventure support. Also D&D organized play is not likely to be better than Pathfinder any time soon.
 

Minigiant

Legend
Supporter
Next is the edition that lets to play the most playstyles without being the best at them. It is mostly balanced, a bit stable, and somewhat tactical but not as much as 4th. If gives some freedom and options but not 3./Pathfinder level. Some bonds and links but not 13th Age level.

It's like a game with many play modes. Not better than a game dedicated to a genre but the lack of dedication keeps the "flaws" of those genre away.
 

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