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D&D 4E 4e Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide - Anyone see it?

SuperGnome

First Post
I was curious if anyone checked it out. I'm pretty leery about getting it myself because, well, it doesn't sound like it's FR due to the extent of rewrites. The thing is, I'm afflicted with the collector's bug and am being drawn towards it like a moth to a flame. I'm curious what everyone's thoughts are, and what drew you to (or pushed you from) the Realms in the first place.

Gnomey
 

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Alabast

First Post
I have it, and I'm disappointed. It's all chewy info, which I normally like, but there's nothing particularly good about in it. They basically took old FR and blew it up, getting rid of half the regions (by either destroying them or combining them into larger nations), and adding a bunch of evil kingdoms for epic pcs to topple for good measure. It's all very dark.

I've run a lot of games in FR, but now, as a DM, I prefer "The World," as presented in the DMG. It's points-of-light and no-map philosophy suits my style of plunking down whatever I need in the game world. FRCG basically does that work for you. If you are a DM and you like that idea, plus you don't mind the tragic recent history of the realms, then I can reccommend FRCG. It's not for anyone else, though.
 

Dalzig

First Post
I've run a lot of games in FR, but now, as a DM, I prefer "The World," as presented in the DMG. It's points-of-light and no-map philosophy suits my style of plunking down whatever I need in the game world. FRCG basically does that work for you. If you are a DM and you like that idea, plus you don't mind the tragic recent history of the realms, then I can reccommend FRCG. It's not for anyone else, though.

It's good for the people that are meant to buy it, but bad for the people who aren't meant to buy it? :hmm:

So, Wizards got something right? :confused:
 

ShaggySpellsword

First Post
I flipped through it. The monsters seemed pretty useful, the opening module didn't look horrible, and it left some pretty cool plot hooks out there that I'm interested in seeing.

Do we have any information on Spellscars beyond this book? They seem like a cross between Spell-Fire and Dragonmarks.

How do they work?
 

Bodhiwolff

First Post
My take on the whole Realms transition is positive, and that is coming from somebody who was a real fan of the Realms as a gaming setting (and who hasn't ever read a novel set there, etc.)

The campaign setting is almost purely background, whereas the player's guide contains the real mechanics aspects for altering the game rules to fit the Realms (classes, races, etc.)

My whole problem with the Realms was that it tended to be a bit static, mostly due to the fact that people had so much invested in the status quo. Things were fairly well set up, and nicely done, but in order to keep things as a universal setting for writers and game developers they couldn't really change much.

Yet, if we look at even the past 100 years of our own world's history, we can see that things can change drastically. We've had two world wars, a handful of world-changing military conflicts. The Empire that ran the world at the beginning of the century gave way to two SuperPowers who held the world in a Cold War which nobody could see a way out of -- until it ended more abruptly than almost anybody expected. The last remaining Superpower's personality and world presence has altered and changed significantly since their involvement in the last truly global war. Intelligence agencies which brooked an almost mythical level of international respect and caution have found themselves so out of touch that they've been downsized, absorbed by other agencies, or simply eliminated. Institutions which were permanent and rock-steady have disappeared.

Time marches on.

The new Campaign Setting reminds me of that.

A lot of things changed. A lot of global conflicts happened. The world moved on, and some nations fared better than others. Powers which used to be incredibly strong are now less so (but perhaps don't want to admit it) and some nations which used to be relatively unknown are discovering that when they flex their muscles their neighbours *have* to take notice. Agencies which used to span the continent are now shadows of their former selves, focussing on one simple task (and remembering their former salad days). Some nations and city-states still retain their former glory, whereas others have been diminished to the point of pity and ridicule, or international disdain.

To me, this is the perfect setting for a "Points of Light" gaming concept. Since there are no longer any sacred cows, there is nothing stopping you from placing anything you need, and anything you want, exactly where you want it to be.

If you don't like a change, you can alter it, or diminish its impact, or simply make it a part of your campaign to reverse it (how many people are going to bring the Harpers back to strength, I wonder?)

But more importantly, it makes the Realms into something fully fleshed out, fully realized, and dynamic. Changeable. Malleable. No longer stagnant. No longer hidebound by the rule of novels, and the dramatic personae imposed by hundreds of writers not wanting their babies messed with.

For now, at least, it is a giant sandbox.

I say it is a great time to play in it!
 

I had the grey box and then the update, missed 2E stuff and only bought the FR 3E Campaign book. So I am a casual FR person. I for one really like the blow up the past stuff, create havoc and leave the basics to the party. I think FR's "fluff" is actually more like Points of Light... it focus' on broad stroaks rather than precision.

It's worth buying for reference, the monsters and if you want to putz around in the world. I find though that I am going back to my Grey box stuff just to see the city maps. If you have the cash buy it.
 

Deverash

First Post
I flipped through it. The monsters seemed pretty useful, the opening module didn't look horrible, and it left some pretty cool plot hooks out there that I'm interested in seeing.

Do we have any information on Spellscars beyond this book? They seem like a cross between Spell-Fire and Dragonmarks.

How do they work?

From what I've read, they are going to be a multi-class only class. So, instead of multiclassing into something else, you can acquire a spellscar and then use it to swap out some powers for your normal ones. Seemed like a decent way to do it. And probably something how they'll do dragonmarks, I'd think...which is unfortunately. haven't seperate mechanics would be a good thing, imo, rather than "These are the spellscars for this world".

The details on them, btw, will in the players guide.
 

Keefe the Thief

Adventurer
My take on the whole Realms transition is positive, and that is coming from somebody who was a real fan of the Realms as a gaming setting (and who hasn't ever read a novel set there, etc.)

The campaign setting is almost purely background, whereas the player's guide contains the real mechanics aspects for altering the game rules to fit the Realms (classes, races, etc.)

My whole problem with the Realms was that it tended to be a bit static, mostly due to the fact that people had so much invested in the status quo. Things were fairly well set up, and nicely done, but in order to keep things as a universal setting for writers and game developers they couldn't really change much.

Yet, if we look at even the past 100 years of our own world's history, we can see that things can change drastically. We've had two world wars, a handful of world-changing military conflicts. The Empire that ran the world at the beginning of the century gave way to two SuperPowers who held the world in a Cold War which nobody could see a way out of -- until it ended more abruptly than almost anybody expected. The last remaining Superpower's personality and world presence has altered and changed significantly since their involvement in the last truly global war. Intelligence agencies which brooked an almost mythical level of international respect and caution have found themselves so out of touch that they've been downsized, absorbed by other agencies, or simply eliminated. Institutions which were permanent and rock-steady have disappeared.

Time marches on.

The new Campaign Setting reminds me of that.

A lot of things changed. A lot of global conflicts happened. The world moved on, and some nations fared better than others. Powers which used to be incredibly strong are now less so (but perhaps don't want to admit it) and some nations which used to be relatively unknown are discovering that when they flex their muscles their neighbours *have* to take notice. Agencies which used to span the continent are now shadows of their former selves, focussing on one simple task (and remembering their former salad days). Some nations and city-states still retain their former glory, whereas others have been diminished to the point of pity and ridicule, or international disdain.

To me, this is the perfect setting for a "Points of Light" gaming concept. Since there are no longer any sacred cows, there is nothing stopping you from placing anything you need, and anything you want, exactly where you want it to be.

If you don't like a change, you can alter it, or diminish its impact, or simply make it a part of your campaign to reverse it (how many people are going to bring the Harpers back to strength, I wonder?)

But more importantly, it makes the Realms into something fully fleshed out, fully realized, and dynamic. Changeable. Malleable. No longer stagnant. No longer hidebound by the rule of novels, and the dramatic personae imposed by hundreds of writers not wanting their babies messed with.

For now, at least, it is a giant sandbox.

I say it is a great time to play in it!

Word. Great post!
 

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