D&D 5E 5e most conservative edition yet? (In terms of new settings)

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
Supporter
That's my only distinction. WotC's D&D team hasn't created any new setting for 5e. They just move licensed settings through the pipeline.

I think you weaken your position every time you have to split hairs.

Do you really think the content creation for the setting is all that different when it is licensed vs not? I submit that the difference isn't really about creativity or work needed - it is a marketing business decision. Licensed properties are expected to have some "built in" audience, where an entirely new one does not.
 

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Mercurius

Legend
I didn't say no new settings, I said no new original settings. And by original settings, I mean non-licensed settings. Do you agree on that point?

But it’s kind of a pointless point. For one, they are new to D&D. Secondly, it isn’t like 4E or 3E had tons of new settings. If you broaden from non-licensed, 5E will surpass both with Theros.

The only edition that saw a ton of new settings, original or not, is 2E. So that is the outlier among the editions, not 5E.
 

I didn't say no new settings, I said no new original settings. And by original settings, I mean non-licensed settings. Do you agree on that point?
That's my only distinction. WotC's D&D team hasn't created any new setting for 5e. They just move licensed settings through the pipeline.

I'm still curious why Wildemount doesn't count.
Yeah, it was originally created by a non-WotC employee for their home game. But the exact same could be said about the Forgotten Realms. Does that mean it's not an original D&D world either?

You could just as easily make the argument Eberron doesn't count as it was created for a contentest and wasn't done by WotC staff.
 

darjr

I crit!
One thing WotC seems to love is support for future things in current books. So just because there is a book with city stuff in it I wouldn’t rule out a book about another city. For instance the waterdeep book and the Ravnica book.
 



My humble predictions for some future works: Shemeska's Guide to Sigil (like the alliteration there), Melf's Guide to the Flanaess (you know if we get Greyhawk, Luke Gygax will be involved).
 

billd91

Not your screen monkey (he/him)
I'm sorry, economics is real mate. There are limits to what you can claim.

A company as incompetent as you want to suggest would have, exactly as I said, gone under in the early 1990s. Clearly some of their products were selling like absolute gangbusters if they were routinely selling other stuff below cost. Also one product selling below cost doesn't mean they all were, which is the suggestion I was responding to.

Early 90s, mid-90s - is there really that big a difference?
 

billd91

Not your screen monkey (he/him)
I have to agree with Jester David here as the more I learn about the inner workings of TSR the more I'm surprised it took them that long to go out of business. TSR just happened to be one of those fortunate companies able to generate enough revenue to offset their poor management for a number of years.

People have said that in the early 80s fad phase of D&D, TSR was basically printing money. It's entirely possible that enabled some very bad habits and business practices to go on uncorrected that eventually bit them in the ass.
 


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