Unearthed Arcana 5E Psionics Alert! The Mystic Is Back In Unearthed Arcana

It's back! The long-awaited new version of the mystic - 5th Edition's psionic class - is here. "The mystic class, a master of psionics, has arrived in its entirety for you to try in your D&D games. Thanks to your playtest feedback on the class’s previous two versions, the class now goes to level 20, has six subclasses, and can choose from many new psionic disciplines and talents. Explore the material here—there’s a lot of it—and let us know what you think in the survey we release in the next installment of Unearthed Arcana." Click the image below for the full 28-page PDF!

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey

Yaarel

Mind Mage
Heh. I agree.
"Kineticist" is just tin-eared and awful.

Regarding ...
Would you call someone a "romant" or a "diabete"? No, because those aren't the words for those traits.
Etymologically, a person who is "Romantic" is a like a "Roman". For what it is worth. (In the sense of translating into French, a story that was originally in Roman Vulgar Latin, called "Romant".)

Diabetes and Diabete would mean the same thing, where the medical term retains Greek final -s.
 
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Yaarel

Mind Mage
A synthete is a person who experiences synthesia.

Synthesia is a variant form synesthesia or synaesthesia.
 
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cbwjm

Legend
As a diabetic currently having a low blood sugar while waiting for some food in a Wendy's. Man, would that be a terrible class.
 

Yaarel

Mind Mage
Somewhat humorously.

The word "diabetes" literally means "a person that goes wide", a euphemism for someone that suffers excessive urination. But the medical term specified a specific kind of diabetes, and extended to include other kinds.
 

Yeah, I was just clarifying that.

The proper term is Synaesthesia, whence synaesthete, synesthete, and synthete.
No, there is no such thing as "synthesia" or a "synthete". The words do not appear in any medical or general-use dictionary (although there is apparently a video game). You are sticking a word you have made up at the end of a list of real words in the hope it can ride on their coattails. It can't.
 

Lanliss

Explorer




In any case, we call athletes "Athletes", not "Athletics".
Yeah, language is inconsistent that way. Every word has its own individual history and usage. There are underlying patterns, to be sure, but there are also lots and lots of breaks in those patterns. For heaven's sake, we English-speakers don't even have a single consistent root for our most basic copular verb! It's be, being, and been, but is, am, are, was, and were. Linguistics is about finding these natural patterns and explaining the breaks, not imposing artificial patterns with invented words. Why is it athlete but also telekinetic? Don't just insist that it ought to be *kinete, try to figure out the story of why it isn't.

(PS: Athletics.)
 
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"Kineticist" is just tin-eared and awful.
::shrug:: matter of opinion. An opinion we share...

Pathfinder went from "telekinetic" to "kineticist", suggesting that dropping the prefix "tele-" is well understood in popular culture. (Your own example of "telephone" to "phone", already points out that dropping the "tele-" for the sake of fewer syllables can be understood well enough.)
Well, there you go. Paizo's infallible, case close. Rip Kineticist from them - assuming it's not trademarkable, of course.


Anyway, never heard 'kinite' or 'kinete' or whatever. I have heard 'telekinetic' shortened to 'teke' (long e, silent e, intuitive English pronunciation), or TK. FWIW.




Apropos of nothing, I've reached that age where you keep remembering useless stuff from when you were younger, while forgetting anything important.
I just recalled this exchange from somewhere:

"So, you know those powers are supposed to have something in common, right? What did you choose?"
"I took Telekinesis, Teleportation, and Telepathy."
"Oh, so your character has mental powers, that's a good theme..."
"Nah, they all started with 'T.'"
 


I'll be honest, all this talk of 'Kineticist' isn't making me think 'person who uses telekinesis'

Its making me think 'Gravity gun from Half Life 2 user'. Because I think 'Kinetic energy' long before I think 'telekinetic'
 



Yeah, language is inconsistent that way. Every word has its own individual history and usage. There are underlying patterns, to be sure, but there are also lots and lots of breaks in those patterns. For heaven's sake, we English-speakers don't even have a single consistent root for our most basic copular verb! It's be, being, and been, but is, am, are, was, and were. Linguistics is about finding these natural patterns and explaining the breaks, not imposing artificial patterns with invented words. Why is it athlete but also telekinetic? Don't just insist that it ought to be *kinete, try to figure out the story of why it isn't.

(PS: Athletics.)

English is hardly unique in an irregular copula. At least we have only one, unlike a lot of languages such as Spanish which possess two (or in some cases more!).
 

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