6E When?

MoonSong

Rules-lawyering drama queen... Be nice plz n_n
The dice pool mechanic I'd advocate is roll a number of d20s based upon your skill ranks (and combat would be skill-based too). Roll under compared to your target number (skill value with conditional modifiers). The amount you succeed is a margin of success (and vice versa for failure). Additional successes add to your margin of success.

Armor would be solely damage reduction rather than the insipid "makes you harder to hit" in D&D.

Hit points would be used as injury thresholds, so you don't remain 100% effective down to 0 hp (with the added benefit of the player naturally knowing when it is time to run away rather than stubbornly staying until you have a TPK).

I like this type of mechanic because everything can be precalculated on your character sheet.
Maybe you should check DAS or Talislantla. Just saying.
 

3catcircus

Explorer
Right, because buying 7-8 modules with a thin connecting material for $30-50 is a better deal than paying in excess of $100 for the same material, and they want to make it easy and affordable for people to get a lot of material.
Yeah, I don't want thin connecting material unless it is planned as a specific adventure path. I want plot hooks that can be exploited by the DM to link any/all modules into a campaign. Those plot hooks can be as simple as a sidebar identifying where to locate a particular adventure in a particular official campaign setting.
 

Parmandur

Legend
Yeah, I don't want thin connecting material unless it is planned as a specific adventure path. I want plot hooks that can be exploited by the DM to link any/all modules into a campaign. Those plot hooks can be as simple as a sidebar identifying where to locate a particular adventure in a particular official campaign setting.
It's super easy to remove the hooks in any of the published 5E adventure books. Easier to remove than to add, certainly.

You may want smaller products that would have the same material as the hardcovers, but the cost and presentation are superior in the collected format and it sells very well, so "ought" doesn't seem to be an appropriate moniker for altering course.
 

LuisCarlos17f

Adventurer
How to explain it with an example? Do you know the car tuning? Hasbro doesn't want to sell lots of pieces of car tuning but the goal is a car in all homes, and after selling pieces for car tuning. Hasbro want to sell the doll, and after when are the girls with one, then to sell clothes for this doll (and the car, and the house, and the pets..)

You can create your house rules, but these to become official is different. If those changes aren't in the retroclon games it will be because some reason. You can create new rules for other board game as Risk or Monopoly, but to sell more they game needs simple rules to be easy to be learnt by the new players.

Hasbro doesn't want a D&D like a Dark Souls for hardcore gamers but a Mario Bros for the new players who are starting. Hasbro doesn't want to sell a hard challenge for fans of model building but a "kindergarten block kit". Hasbro doesn't want to sell a Shakespeare's or Tolstoi novel but a Julio Verne or Emilio Salgari's book adapted to teen public.

3.5 was lot of crunch (feat, spells, magic item..) and now 5th Ed is recycling the fluff (lore or background). A new edition only can be after when nothing new can be added. With DM Guild you have enough crunch to fill up. WotC doesn't need risks yet, but to publish something 3rd party publishers can't sell so good.

The next edition will not be D&D but a different name, for example Universal d20 system, and with a feedback not only from players, but with idead from the own 3rd Party publishers to can be added to their own settings (for example Courage as ability score for a gothic horror setting).
 

3catcircus

Explorer
It's super easy to remove the hooks in any of the published 5E adventure books. Easier to remove than to add, certainly.

You may want smaller products that would have the same material as the hardcovers, but the cost and presentation are superior in the collected format and it sells very well, so "ought" doesn't seem to be an appropriate moniker for altering course.
Superior for whom? I've got BECMI and 1ed modules sitting on my shelf that, other than a little oxidation on the staples, is just fine. I've also got hard-bound 3e and 4e books that started falling apart within months of purchase.

I *don't want the same material as in the hardcovers. I want to drop in adventures that can be used in any campaign, either as a side quest or as part of the main plot. Dungeon Crawl Classics did a great job of this in 3e.

The fact that they've adapted 1e modules to 5e, like B2, and posted them on dmsguild (not the giant hardcover conversion of B2) tells you they know people want this type of product.
 
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Parmandur

Legend
Superior for whom? I've got BECMI and 1ed modules sitting on my shelf that, other than a little oxidation on the staples, is just fine. I've also got hard-bound 3e and 4e books that started falling apart within months of purchase.

I *don't want the same material as in the hardcovers. I want to drop in adventures that can be used in any campaign, either as a side quest or as part of the main plot. Dungeon Crawl Classics did a great job of this in 3e.

The fact that they've adapted 1e modules to 5e, like B2 tells you they know people want this type of product.
Well, superior for people who don't have all of that older material nor the resources to drop $20 a pop on a bunch of 32 page booklets, like the teens who are the main audience.

I bolded two sentences, that directly contradict each other. The chapters in the big adventure books are, in fact, drop in adventures that can be used in any campaign, either as a side quest or as part of the main plot.

The fact that they've printed collections of 1E modules in the same format that are not much different shows this fairly well.
 

3catcircus

Explorer
They haven't.
Really? Go look on dmsguild.com. There are about a dozen classic modules that have been converted. A bunch were converted to 3e and posted on this very website back in the day. People want the older modules because the content resonates, even though the mechanics have changed actual the editions.
 

Parmandur

Legend
Really? Go look on dmsguild.com. There are about a dozen classic modules that have been converted. A bunch were converted to 3e and posted on this very website back in the day. People want the older modules because the content resonates, even though the mechanics have changed actual the editions.
Those are conversion documents, that is to say, guidelines for what to do with the actual module, not modules translated into 5E.
 

3catcircus

Explorer
Those are conversion documents, that is to say, guidelines for what to do with the actual module, not modules translated into 5E.
No, they're actual conversions of the stats, if I recall. Combine that with the fact that the originals are also available = you have the module translated to 5e.
 

Parmandur

Legend
No, they're actual conversions of the stats, if I recall. Combine that with the fact that the originals are also available = you have the module translated to 5e.
Yes, that's what I said, a guide with conversion information, not a converted module, like that in Ghosts of Saltmarsh.
 

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