Adventure Time TTRPG Drops "Yes And" System, Switches To 5E

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When the Adventure Time roleplaying game was announced back in June, it was going to be using a brand new RPG system called the "Yes And" system, which involved dice which had Yes and No on one die, and things like And or But on the other.

However, publisher Cryptozoic Entertainment has recently indicated that, following fan feedback, the upcoming Kickstarter will now be powered by 5E instead. The update was included last week as part of the FAQ in its current Adventure Time card game Kickstarter.

Has Adventure Time: The Roleplaying Game changed since you announced it a few months ago?

Yes, we made the decision to make it a 5e experience, based on feedback from fans. That doesn’t mean the game shown at Gen Con earlier this year won’t be released too, but the main offering in the upcoming Kickstarter will be the 5e RPG.
 

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What are the mechanical incentives for people to behave like Finn and Jake do on the Adventure Time show in 2E D&D?
?

I can easily say that it's a 1st through 5th level game with milestone or story-based enhancement where the only incentive is to go out and have adventure. I really don't get the gotcha here. Does a D&D-based show have to explicitly show you that someone has unlocked "Extra Attack at 5th level" to be D&D??
 

Can you give any ideas of how 5e could work for AT, mechanically?
I'm not making an Adventure Time supplement and have no interest in it. If I was doing it, I'd probably make it Milestone/Story-based advancement, and make a lot of whacky magic items and feats and spells for people to have, and then make silly dungeons that have silly effects in them. Most of Adventure Time's story comes from weird characters or a weird-magical environment, both of which you can easily do in D&D.
 


Whizbang Dustyboots

Gnometown Hero
I can easily say that it's a 1st through 5th level game with milestone or story-based enhancement where the only incentive is to go out and have adventure. I really don't get the gotcha here.
It's not a gotcha, but I guess you genuinely don't understand what everyone else is saying, which might explain why you're so vociferously against what they're arguing.
Does a D&D-based show have to explicitly show you that someone has unlocked "Extra Attack at 5th level" to be D&D??
That's not what anyone is talking about.
 

It's not a gotcha, but I guess you genuinely don't understand what everyone else is saying, which might explain why you're so vociferously against what they're arguing.

That's not what anyone is talking about.
Still waiting for your clarification. Not to mention people have literally asked in this thread such innane questions as what is the modifiee bonus on finns sword lmao
 

Whizbang Dustyboots

Gnometown Hero
Still waiting for your clarification.
I'm not sure how much more time to give to this, since people have tried to explain this to you multiple times, and you've been rudely dismissive throughout. It appears that some of this is due to ignorance, but your attitude is all you.

But on the off chance this is worth it: Games provide mechanical incentives to encourage the sort of play the designers want to see in the game.
  • Old school D&D, for instance, gave XP for accumulating treasure not for killing monsters, which incentivized sneaking around, stealing stuff and running before the monster found you.
  • Later versions of D&D instead gave D&D for "overcoming obstacles," which incentivized overcoming foes by whatever means possible and, as a result, made treasure a lot less appealing unless there was something to spend it on (see the relevant mega-thread for more on that).
  • In 5E, inspiration is supposed to be given out for clever play or roleplaying, which helps incentivize those. (In practice, advantage is so easy to get in 5E, lots of DMs don't bother with inspiration.)
  • In other, non-D&D games, characters sometimes get XP or plot tokens (inspiration counterparts, but often more powerful) for failing a task, incentivizing trying all sorts of stuff, with the expectation that bravery and recklessness is the path to future success.
To emulate something like the Adventure Time TV show, there should be mechanical incentives -- the equivalent of inspiration or XP or something else entirely -- for confronting feelings, dealing with hard truths, bonding with friends, making exciting discoveries. None of those are really covered by anything any version of D&D has done, so either new incentives would have to be created, what rewards XP would have to be changed, or both.

As listed, and as stated earlier, the incentives in 2E D&D, which Pendleton Ward says is what inspired Adventure Time, are to kill stuff and take their treasure. Whether or not D&D was what inspired the show, those incentives would lead to PC behavior that doesn't match the Adventure Time fiction. (It would certainly change the relationship between Finn, Jake and the Ice King, for instance.) While players can and do sometimes ignore incentives, counting on them to ignore the rules of the game for the sake of the fiction is asking the many mechanically minded players out there to play the game "wrong." Better, instead, to create mechanical incentives to play the game "right" and match the fiction.
 

I'm not sure how much more time to give to this, since people have tried to explain this to you multiple times, and you've been rudely dismissive throughout. It appears that some of this is due to ignorance, but your attitude is all you.

But on the off chance this is worth it: Games provide mechanical incentives to encourage the sort of play the designers want to see in the game.
  • Old school D&D, for instance, gave XP for accumulating treasure not for killing monsters, which incentivized sneaking around, stealing stuff and running before the monster found you.
  • Later versions of D&D instead gave D&D for "overcoming obstacles," which incentivized overcoming foes by whatever means possible and, as a result, made treasure a lot less appealing unless there was something to spend it on (see the relevant mega-thread for more on that).
  • In 5E, inspiration is supposed to be given out for clever play or roleplaying, which helps incentivize those. (In practice, advantage is so easy to get in 5E, lots of DMs don't bother with inspiration.)
  • In other, non-D&D games, characters sometimes get XP or plot tokens (inspiration counterparts, but often more powerful) for failing a task, incentivizing trying all sorts of stuff, with the expectation that bravery and recklessness is the path to future success.
To emulate something like the Adventure Time TV show, there should be mechanical incentives -- the equivalent of inspiration or XP or something else entirely -- for confronting feelings, dealing with hard truths, bonding with friends, making exciting discoveries. None of those are really covered by anything any version of D&D has done, so either new incentives would have to be created, what rewards XP would have to be changed, or both.

As listed, and as stated earlier, the incentives in 2E D&D, which Pendleton Ward says is what inspired Adventure Time, are to kill stuff and take their treasure. Whether or not D&D was what inspired the show, those incentives would lead to PC behavior that doesn't match the Adventure Time fiction. (It would certainly change the relationship between Finn, Jake and the Ice King, for instance.) While players can and do sometimes ignore incentives, counting on them to ignore the rules of the game for the sake of the fiction is asking the many mechanically minded players out there to play the game "wrong." Better, instead, to create mechanical incentives to play the game "right" and match the fiction.
This is literally just making it so you experience for doing the silly stupid things that Jake and Finn get into. It's just a matter of "Go learn about the Ice King" or "Go rescue some people from the Ice King's latest scheme" and you get exp through both learning about him, dealing with some whacky and silly stuff, and then overcoming a few fights with the Ice King's latest minions. Experience for all of that. It's just really such a small thing that I couldn't see how it's a problem. Changing how you get experience is the oldest and easiest trick in the book, and there's so many ways to deal with it. I mean, Wild Beyond the Witchlight already had advancement options for characters who NEVER fight. It's been done already. Even for my own published setting, Scavenger, I have an entire experience system that is remodeled and dedicated to scavenging different things and bringing them back to patrons. It is not hard to do, and it changes the entire feel of the game in a way that is fun and expressive.
 



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