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D&D General Another D&D pronunciation question - this one's for Grognards

MarkB

Legend
And when I say "for" Grognards, I actually mean "about". How do you pronounce "grognard"?

I've always mentally 'heard' it as being a very British English pronunciation, Grog-Nard. But when listening to a podcast recently, one of the presenters spoke it with a more continental pronunciation, i.e. Groan-Yard, pronouncing the "gn" much as in "Sauvignon".

According to Wikipedia the term's derivation is French, so I guess that is the more correct pronunciation, but as one of those terms I've only really encountered written down, it took me by surprise. How would you pronounce it?
 

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Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
And when I say "for" Grognards, I actually mean "about". How do you pronounce "grognard"?

I've always mentally 'heard' it as being a very British English pronunciation, Grog-Nard. But when listening to a podcast recently, one of the presenters spoke it with a more continental pronunciation, i.e. Groan-Yard, pronouncing the "gn" much as in "Sauvignon".

According to Wikipedia the term's derivation is French, so I guess that is the more correct pronunciation, but as one of those terms I've only really encountered written down, it took me by surprise. How would you pronounce it?

Grog (as in synonym for rum & water) ... nard (synonym for, um ... nevermind).

Emphasis on first syllable.

It comes from the French, but I've never heard it with the French pronunciation in reference to TTRPGs.
 



Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
So bonus fun fact while I was trying to source this:

Bulette (the monster) is pronounces "boo-lay." I had a vague recollection of that, but was able to track it back to Dragon #1.

This is bugging me now. I am assuming that the first uses of it in wargaming pronounced it as in the French (given the familiarity), but by the time it was established (it was well-established enough by 1979 to be used without comment) I think it was used with the in the Anglicized way, generally.

In my neck of the woods, I never heard anyone referring to it using the French pronunciation, but ... well, that was hardly a surprise.

Hmmm. There has to be someone here that knows this?
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
So bonus fun fact while I was trying to source this:

Bulette (the monster) is pronounces "boo-lay." I had a vague recollection of that, but was able to track it back to Dragon #1.

This is bugging me now. I am assuming that the first uses of it in wargaming pronounced it as in the French (given the familiarity), but by the time it was established (it was well-established enough by 1979 to be used without comment) I think it was used with the in the Anglicized way, generally.

In my neck of the woods, I never heard anyone referring to it using the French pronunciation, but ... well, that was hardly a surprise.

Hmmm. There has to be someone here that knows this?
I don’t have grognard I don’t think but I do have bullette.

 

MarkB

Legend
So bonus fun fact while I was trying to source this:

Bulette (the monster) is pronounces "boo-lay." I had a vague recollection of that, but was able to track it back to Dragon #1.

This is bugging me now. I am assuming that the first uses of it in wargaming pronounced it as in the French (given the familiarity), but by the time it was established (it was well-established enough by 1979 to be used without comment) I think it was used with the in the Anglicized way, generally.

In my neck of the woods, I never heard anyone referring to it using the French pronunciation, but ... well, that was hardly a surprise.

Hmmm. There has to be someone here that knows this?
Boo-lay isn't even proper French pronunciation. A single T at the end of a word is silent - i.e. "chalet" - but "ette" is pronounced as "et" in French - i.e. "toilette".
 




Alzrius

The EN World kitten
I love planescape. But I refuse to use the hard g. It sounds ridiculous to me
I remember hearing it pronounced with the hard "g" in the audio CD that came included with A Player's Primer to the Outlands (affiliate link) and raising my eyebrows. But it wasn't a mispronunciation; there was a bit of in-character marginalia in another Planescape book (I can't recall which one) that had someone saying (paraphrasing here) "you're under arrest for pronouncing our beloved Sigil as if it were 'Sijil.'"
 









I think the fairest approach is to give it the French pronunciation when referring to the grognards of Napoleonic miniatures wargaming, where that is doubtlessly the authentic usage and is an in-joke about the underlying historical matter, and lay down the hard central "g" in the various fantasy elf game contexts, where the name always sounded like some sort of vaguely goblinoid creature to me.
 

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