D&D Movie/TV Casting Begins Soon For D&D Movie?

According to Screenrant, Paramount's (Summer 2021) Dungeons & Dragons movie is about to begin casting.


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There's a few tidbits to be gleaned from the article:
  • Paramount is looking at A-listers for the male lead
  • The new draft of the script is by Michael Gillio
  • The director is no longer involved, and the studio is looking for a new one
There has been plenty of news, speculation, rumour, and more about this movie over the last few years; in fact, I've been covering the various rumours for at least 5 years!
 

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey

Hussar

Legend
Source material goes along with expectations. If you adapt a novel one should make the attempt to do it faithfully. Liberties have to be taken with things like dialogue of course.

Your expectations maybe.

I expect that any source material will provide inspiration and nothing more. It's no different than seeing Romeo and Juliet set in the 1950's using drag cars instead of swords. An excellent adaptation of the play by the way. I, for myself, never, ever expect the movie to "faithfully" reproduce the novel.

Saves a TON of angst.

I mean, I've seen two different movie adaptations of Dune now, and neither was any more than loosely based on the book. Yet, both movies are excellent.

Judge a work based on itself and not your preconceived notions of what it "should" be and I would suggest that you will find the experience much more rewarding and fun.
 

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Zardnaar

Legend
Your expectations maybe.

I expect that any source material will provide inspiration and nothing more. It's no different than seeing Romeo and Juliet set in the 1950's using drag cars instead of swords. An excellent adaptation of the play by the way. I, for myself, never, ever expect the movie to "faithfully" reproduce the novel.

Saves a TON of angst.

I mean, I've seen two different movie adaptations of Dune now, and neither was any more than loosely based on the book. Yet, both movies are excellent.

Judge a work based on itself and not your preconceived notions of what it "should" be and I would suggest that you will find the experience much more rewarding and fun.

Depends if you want to do treasure island pay attention to the book. If you want to do a tribute or pirate adventure call it something else.

This is the 4E thing again basically. You have to meet your customers expectations especially if it's an existing franchise.

If I was going to adapt a D&D book I would be looking at one of the Elaine Cunningham books perhaps not Drizzt or Dragonlance.

Dragonlance better as a TV show, and the main books have not aged well.
 
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Hussar

Legend
The game is the source material, not any particular novel. The original D&D movie failed because it had no respect for D&D.

No. The original D&D movie failed because it was total and utter crap. Poor acting, bad story, and Jeremy Irons chewing his way through every scene. It failed because it was a bad movie.
[MENTION=6716779]Zardnaar[/MENTION], I'll see your 4e D&D and raise you two Blade Runner movies. Because the original Blade Runner, other than sharing some names, is most certainly NOT Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep.
 

Blade Runner was a good movie, but it was a poor adaptation of the book. It's quite feasible that a good movie be made that had nothing in common with D&D apart from the name. I don't think D&D fans would be happy with that.
 

Hussar

Legend
Blade Runner was a good movie, but it was a poor adaptation of the book. It's quite feasible that a good movie be made that had nothing in common with D&D apart from the name. I don't think D&D fans would be happy with that.

Given the choice between good movie and good adaptation, I'll take good movie every time. D&D means a dozen different things to a dozen different people. Trying to appease fans is a fools errand. And, frankly, there aren't nearly enough D&D fans out there to make the movie popular anyway. If D&D fans all hate the movie, but, it is Fast and Furious level popular outside of D&D fandom, well, I'll take that over making some neckbeard happy.
 


robus

Lowcountry Low Roller
Supporter
Given the choice between good movie and good adaptation, I'll take good movie every time. D&D means a dozen different things to a dozen different people. Trying to appease fans is a fools errand. And, frankly, there aren't nearly enough D&D fans out there to make the movie popular anyway. If D&D fans all hate the movie, but, it is Fast and Furious level popular outside of D&D fandom, well, I'll take that over making some neckbeard happy.

I’ll take that. I want to cheer for the heroes and boo the baddies and enjoy a rollicking good fantasy adventure. I don’t want to wince at poor dialogue and cringe at bad special effects. Checking a few D&D boxes would be fine, but I don’t think I’m going to get a clever Charlie Kaufman meta plot that blends real-life and fantasy.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, I’d love an after credits scene that has the primary cast sitting around a table highfiving each other and asking the DM when they’ll get together again for another adventure. That would be enough of a D&D reference for me, and then the DM looks to the camera and smiles deviously. Actually to be super awesome have the DM be an “animation” of all the various other minor characters in movie modifying the DMs face. Cut to “D&D will return to theaters Fall of 2022!” or whatever :)
 

Given the choice between good movie and good adaptation, I'll take good movie every time. D&D means a dozen different things to a dozen different people. Trying to appease fans is a fools errand. And, frankly, there aren't nearly enough D&D fans out there to make the movie popular anyway. If D&D fans all hate the movie, but, it is Fast and Furious level popular outside of D&D fandom, well, I'll take that over making some neckbeard happy.

There are dozens of good movies made every year, and no D&D movies. Whilst I would prefer a good D&D movie, I will settle for a mediocre one over an Oscar winning movie about how a child who was disabled in a car crash on the way to a D&D game overcomes adversity to become a champion marathon runner.

And if there aren't enough D&D fans for upsetting them to be an issue, then there aren't enough D&D fans to make it worth while sticking a D&D label on a movie in the first place.
 

Given the choice between good movie and good adaptation, I'll take good movie every time. D&D means a dozen different things to a dozen different people. Trying to appease fans is a fools errand. And, frankly, there aren't nearly enough D&D fans out there to make the movie popular anyway. If D&D fans all hate the movie, but, it is Fast and Furious level popular outside of D&D fandom, well, I'll take that over making some neckbeard happy.

I'd prefer no movie at all over a good fantasy movie that has nothing to do with D&D but the D&D label slapped on. There's more good movies than I have time to watch, so a "D&D movie" that isn't actually D&D has very little value for me, in fact it has negative value since it would reduce the chance of a proper D&D movie being made.
 

Hussar

Legend
There are dozens of good movies made every year, and no D&D movies. Whilst I would prefer a good D&D movie, I will settle for a mediocre one over an Oscar winning movie about how a child who was disabled in a car crash on the way to a D&D game overcomes adversity to become a champion marathon runner.

And if there aren't enough D&D fans for upsetting them to be an issue, then there aren't enough D&D fans to make it worth while sticking a D&D label on a movie in the first place.

Heh. There's a difference between D&D fan and "recognizes the brand". Same way that there are TONS of Marvel fans who have never even opened a comic book. Or, tons of Batman fans that have never read a comic book. While there are lots of comic book fans, they are vastly, vastly outnumbered by fans of the movies. When my Japanese students are wearing Batman T-shirts, and instantly know who Batman is, I'm pretty sure they are not comic book fans.

Same deal with D&D.
 

It has come up before in this topic, and in most other topics here about a D&D movie, but there is no real identity to what D&D is setting-wise. A lot of other game systems out there have only one world that is used and the game name is the setting name. Plus many game systems are set in alternate versions of our world. Sure, with 5th Ed, they are really trying to tie the game to the Forgotten Realms, but it is not the only world the game system has used in it's history. Then you toss in fans who may have played some games where the DM used a homebrew world and they also watch some of the streaming shows that do not use any of the official WotC-owned settings. I think they will need to call it a Forgotten Realms movie or a Greyhawk movie or a Tal'Dorei movie, etc, and not a D&D movie.
 

I would dispute that 5e is trying to tie the game to the Forgotten Realms. For the most part, 5e stuff focuses on "setting agnostic" and "homebrew", with FR as a convenient default. Pretty much as 1st edition defaulted to Greyhawk, even though most of the published stuff had nothing Grewhawk-specific. Campaign setting specificity was a 2nd edition thing.

But certainly, the setting isn't important for a movie, although I would go for a Generic Fantasy setting over something more wild and whacky (Eberron, Planescape, Dark Sun, Spelljammer, Ravenloft) at least for a first movie.
 

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