D&D Movie/TV Casting Begins Soon For D&D Movie?

According to Screenrant, Paramount's (Summer 2021) Dungeons & Dragons movie is about to begin casting.


drizzt-do-urden-dungeons-and-dragons.jpg



There's a few tidbits to be gleaned from the article:
  • Paramount is looking at A-listers for the male lead
  • The new draft of the script is by Michael Gillio
  • The director is no longer involved, and the studio is looking for a new one
There has been plenty of news, speculation, rumour, and more about this movie over the last few years; in fact, I've been covering the various rumours for at least 5 years!
 

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey

TarionzCousin

Second Most Angelic Devil Ever
I haven't read this entire thread, but has anyone suggested Vin Diesel be in the movie yet?


... as a corpse. Maybe give him one line. Then have him get speared right in the spleen.
 

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Oofta

Legend
Did you miss the part where I said multimedia? Games, TV shows, movies that sort of thing. RPG is doing great and things tied to the RPG such as minis etc are doing fine.

Big bucks are in a game or movie maybe a TV show though.

Hey now, I think WildSpace could have been truly epic! Apparently it was some kind of VCR game TSR piloted that you can see here.

Ah, the glory that could have been. :.-(
 

Oofta

Legend
But a Drizzt cameo has so much potential (I don't like the character - although I have in the past read many of the books, but you can't say he isn't popular! Divisive I'll accept, disliked by some I'd agree, but he is popular by any measure!).

His appearance is a plus for those who like the charater, and an Easter egg for those who remember the BG games; he's introduced as a character and if the movie flies a wider FRCU has been hinted at and is ready to go! He even has a massive origin story to call upon if you want (as trilogy worth at least, surely) - although the Drow as per the books are pretty problematic as movie fodder.

Being one of the biggest Mary Marty Sues around is also a bit of an issue for some people.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
A 250 million film costs 150 to 250 in marketing. So on the low end that's 400 million. The studio only gets half the box office, so you're looking at 800 million to break even. But China only gives about 25% instead of half, so you actually need more than 800 million to break even.

There have been so many high profile flops the last few years since that 250 number was first discussed, that I expect the studio to cut that budget down. 100 to 150 million tops, with 100 on marketing. But even then you still need 400-500 million to break even. Movie business is hard business these days :p

I know Solo lost money on 400 million turnover, The Force Awakens grossed 2 billion but 1.3 of that was eaten up apparently. Looking at ratios is also interesting and by that I mean how much a movie made vs its cost. 200 million a movie used to be a lot starting around 1995's Waterworld, now its kind of half expected for a AAA title.

Personally think they need to tone down the marketing and special effects, make a good movie with interesting character. Basic storyteliing 101.
 


No kidding, it looks like the Dumbo remake is flying like a Boeing 737 Max 8!

Really? The forecast just For North America is an opening weekend of about $48 million, on a budget of about $170 million. It will end up making money easily when international ticket sales get added in.

Plus it is Tim Burton. Get Tim Burton to direct a D&D movie and it will be awesome. :)
 


robus

Lowcountry Low Roller
Supporter
Really? The forecast just For North America is an opening weekend of about $48 million, on a budget of about $170 million. It will end up making money easily when international ticket sales get added in.

That’s excluding marketing costs, but sure we’ll see how it goes.
 

Hussar

Legend
I dunno. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory looks like a D&D game to me. Same with the Alice movies.

One wonders what people actually think a D&D movie should look like.
 




That’s excluding marketing costs, but sure we’ll see how it goes.

Yes, marketing is part of the total cost, plus if any of the actors contracts state they get a percentage share of the profits, if actors still do those kinds of contracts. But a film making money is also more than just ticket sales. It is also streaming and on-demand and dvd/bluray sales, etc. Whenever I see talk about whether a movie makes money just on ticket sales, I always wonder about all the post-theatrical release money too. It is in that area that some movies become profitable and even earn sequels because of it, even if some of those sequels are only direct-to-video.
 

I dunno. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory looks like a D&D game to me. Same with the Alice movies.

One wonders what people actually think a D&D movie should look like.

Yeah, I am double posting, but I can't seem to get this site to work right and quote two posts at the same time. lol

Anyway, Willow is a D&D movie to me. And the LotR movies are serious D&D movies, while the Hobbit movies are more like what happens at the gaming table, with all the ridiculous stunts and stupid gags.
 

Traycor

Explorer
But a film making money is also more than just ticket sales. It is also streaming and on-demand and dvd/bluray sales, etc. Whenever I see talk about whether a movie makes money just on ticket sales, I always wonder about all the post-theatrical release money too. It is in that area that some movies become profitable and even earn sequels because of it, even if some of those sequels are only direct-to-video.

These used to be bonus money, but now they are what makes a film profitable. Take Spider-Verse for example, which was considered successful and has already spawned sequels. It cost $90 million, plus a likely $100 million in marketing. So $190 cost, which would require $380 million to break even. World wide it's made $372, which means it just broke even. However, this film is apparently expected to make lots of money off tie-ins (which also defray marketing costs), and all the things you listed above. Sony considered it wildly successful. This might partly be because it was so well received, which means future films are likely to make more box office and cost less to market.
 

Traycor

Explorer
I know Solo lost money on 400 million turnover, The Force Awakens grossed 2 billion but 1.3 of that was eaten up apparently. Looking at ratios is also interesting and by that I mean how much a movie made vs its cost. 200 million a movie used to be a lot starting around 1995's Waterworld, now its kind of half expected for a AAA title.

Analyzing individual films is always difficult, because the studio conceals the real budget and marketing costs. Sometimes they fudge the numbers higher to make a film look more expensive, while sometimes they drastically lower the numbers below the actual cost to make a film look profitable. Back when Nikkie Finke used to report at Deadline, she was brutally honest about what the real numbers were vs what was reported.

Personally think they need to tone down the marketing and special effects, make a good movie with interesting character. Basic storyteliing 101.

The industry sees this opposite. A film with no marketing crashes and burns, so a low budget movie will actually have a larger marketing budget than the actual film budget.
 

I dunno. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory looks like a D&D game to me. Same with the Alice movies.

One wonders what people actually think a D&D movie should look like.

But Tim Burton's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory looks nothing like Roald Dahl's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and his Alice movies look even less like Lewis Carol's Wonderland (Indeed Dungeonland & Land Beyond the Magic Mirror are much closer to the books). On the other hand, they do look like every other Tim Burton movie ever made. He has no respect for source material.

Now, it's quite possible that your D&D games look like a Tim Burton movie (not movies, he has only made one movie lots of times), everyone's home games look different.
 



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