Cookin again

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
The shredded chicken is what I got in Greece (Athens and the islands) and in most restaurants. I suspect the meatball variant is either Lebanese or a regional variant.
I have this wonderful Greek place near work - they do marvelous soups (not all of which are anywhere near Greek, but all are good). Their avgolemono uses meatballs.

When I made it the last time, I had a bit too much orzo, and it came out a tad thick. Absolutely nobody complained.
A risk when adding pasta or rice to any soup is the sideways step into a stew/soup hybrid. Stoup.
 
I wish I had a wonderful Greek place at all.:cry: One of the downsides of where I live is an almost non-existent restaurant selection. We have a couple of generic hotel kitchens, a greasy spoon, and a shawarma place. Thank god for shawarma or I'd living in hillbilly hell. I miss Indian take out so much. sad trombone
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Tip: we’ve had runs on all kinds of meat, and while availability is somewhat stabilized, there are still gaps that pop up. For example, the Vet wants our younger dog on a low fat chicken & rice diet...and breast meat is curry as rare as rice.

Fortunately, we have a big(ish) bag of rice to work from, but the meat?

Well, our solution is turkey. A generic brand turkey costs 69¢/lb, which is cheaper than chicken. And NOBODY is buying them, relatively speaking.
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
Coronovirus time (for those looking at this post years in the future). I was at Tescos, and the shelves were stripped bare. No bread, eggs, pasta, loo roll. Nothing. Empty shelves.

Until you get to the "American" section.

Yes, I know we don’t put staples like potatoes and bread and water and oxygen and apples and pasta and eggs and stuff in the American food section. It’s just a few easily imported and stored packaged brands to put in a corner of the supermarket. We understand you eat other things too. Geez, why do I have to say this in advance. Because I’ve met the Internet. You’ll still say it anyway.


D701DE61-DE06-4EB6-9E26-D396D7648220.jpeg
F89317A1-B3A0-422E-A184-73E5C42BDD43.jpeg
E81BFC08-4697-485F-8C70-3861E7D95DA5.jpeg
6D0D90DB-6334-42BC-A5A6-5F25431D2609.jpeg
44E81A6E-CF12-4CD6-BD78-364634982DA1.jpeg
D96C446C-DB6F-4B83-9A1A-E9B128C743F7.jpeg
8E9BBB53-23F4-4812-8836-A76D0D21A52A.jpeg
 
Last edited:

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
I saw some pix from a Boston area grocery store with a soup section containing only untouched cans of Manhattan Clam Chowder.

It seems, “Yankees Suck!” isn’t just a rallying cry, it’s part of their DNA.
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
I saw some pix from a Boston area grocery store with a soup section containing only untouched cans of Manhattan Clam Chowder.

It seems, “Yankees Suck!” isn’t just a rallying cry, it’s part of their DNA.
I have no idea what that sentence means! Its like, it's almost English... but it's not? Regional terminology is a killer! :D
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Tonight’s dinner salad:

Spinach
Shredded dark meat turkey
Tomatoes
Carrots
Olives
Pickled Brussels sprouts
Chives
Parsley
Cracked black pepper
Tarragon vinegar
Mesquite infused EVOO
 

Ulfgeir

Explorer
1584867932508.png


I made a homemade vegetable soup yesterday. Started with 2 cubes of store-brought broth, then added carrots, potatoes, leek, an onion. Seasoned it with red pepper corns, black pepper (should have been more), and a little bit of Californa Reaper-flavoured salt. Served with Crisp bread. If only I had had some cheese at home.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
That reminds me- I have cabbage to cook...

So far, our household’s second biggest challenge of the pandemic- after our younger dog’s health misadventures- has been getting Mom to do things like eat leftovers and not send people to the grocery store every couple of days.

I love her, but she presents some unique challenges.
 

Vael

Adventurer
Well, our solution is turkey. A generic brand turkey costs 69¢/lb, which is cheaper than chicken. And NOBODY is buying them, relatively speaking.
We did the same, though turkey wasn't as cheap here. Tried the turkey spatchcock, and it worked quite well. Took half the time it'd normally take to roast and came out nice and juicy.
 

Vael

Adventurer
I’ve never spatchcocked a bird. How difficult was it?
Not too difficult, you're more or less just cutting out the spine of the bird and flattening it. We watched a few Youtube videos and it came out pretty well. It was easy enough that we're considering it other times we cook poultry.
 

prabe

Aspiring Lurker (He/Him)
I’m a CI subscriber, so no prob, regardless. THANKS!
I knew someone here was, other than me. No worries. I strongly prefer to cook thighs or leg quarters over whole birds, but I knew Cook's was a strong proponent of the technique.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
For chicken, I’m a thigh guy myself.

But when it comes to turkey, I like the whole bird...if it’s done right. Personally, I steam my turkey, but I’m always open to learning new techniques. And spatchcocked turkey would probably be awesome on the grill or in a smoker.
 

prabe

Aspiring Lurker (He/Him)
For chicken, I’m a thigh guy myself.

But when it comes to turkey, I like the whole bird...if it’s done right. Personally, I steam my turkey, but I’m always open to learning new techniques. And spatchcocked turkey would probably be awesome on the grill or in a smoker.
Yeah--I think I remember that you cook for much more of a crowd than I do. It's just my wife and me, and even aiming for leftovers just about any size whole turkey is a lot of turkey. I think I remember Cook's doing something with a spatchcocked turkey on the grill ... but I didn't find it quickly. I found spatchcocked grilled chicken, which you might be able to adapt for turkey. There might be recipes online--it does seem like a viable alternative.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
While I mainly cook for me, Mom & Dad, I also occasionally add my two aunts’ households to the mix. In fact, to take advantage of the cheap turkeys, I’m cooking a big one out of my maternal aunt’s freezer and splitting that meat with her & her son, plus some to my paternal aunt & her fiancée.*

Then there are assorted cousins in town, friends, etc.

When special occasions hit, it’s a horde of locusts!

But even when I’m not cooking for half the county, I still tend to make big batches...at least, of certain dishes. That way, I can have leftovers in the freezer. For example, the oyster dressing I brought to my paternal aunt’s Christmas gathering had been cooked at the same time as the one I served at Thanksgiving.

Cooking those “megabatches” saves me time & effort cooking and cleaning.


* to be clear, it’s a two-way street, cooking-wise
 

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
Yeah--I think I remember that you cook for much more of a crowd than I do. It's just my wife and me, and even aiming for leftovers just about any size whole turkey is a lot of turkey. I think I remember Cook's doing something with a spatchcocked turkey on the grill ... but I didn't find it quickly. I found spatchcocked grilled chicken, which you might be able to adapt for turkey. There might be recipes online--it does seem like a viable alternative.
A turkey is a lot of meat, for sure. But that's a good thing, if you're trying to restock your meat supply quickly and cheaply. You needn't cook the whole turkey all at once. If you partially thaw it for a day or two in the refrigerator--not completely, just enough to get a knife through it-- you can break it down into legs, thighs, wings, etc., and refreeze it in portions to be cooked as needed.
 

Advertisement

Top