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Cookin again

Zardnaar

Legend
Sorry, wasn’t clear: I’ve been eating tabouli for DECADES. Love the stuff! But I’d never asked for it at this Afghani kebab shop. I had no idea if they even had any.

Even if it weren’t part of their own cuisine, a lot of the Mediterranean/Arabic places in the D/FW Metroplex are really fusion restaurants*, so they might have had it anyway. A lot of the “Geek” places are run by Lebanese families. There’s a lot of crossover from the “Persians” and Ethiopians into Italian cuisine, as well as a bunch of Romanian pizzerias.



* TBF fusion joints of all kinds are all over the Metroplex. Mexican, Chinese and Indian are some of the biggest core crossover cuisines here, with creole on the rise.

Similar here with Arabic/Turkish/Afghani.

That Indo-Nepalese place brdt for curry got the idea from your one.

"Gamenight" tonight.


Irish Pub. Looks like they have Emerson's on tap (local beer pretty damn good).

Dint think I'm brave enough to try the hare. Haven't tried rabbit since I was a kid.
 

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Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
I may or may not have had rabbit as a kid. Creole cuisine, y’know? But the last time I tried to have some as an adult, I was thwarted by an inability to find the local chain (The Rapid Rabbit) that was advetising all over TV & radio.

My roomie/bestie and I REALLY went looking one of their spots, and never succeeded.
 

prabe

Aspiring Lurker (He/Him)
Supporter
I may or may not have had rabbit as a kid. Creole cuisine, y’know? But the last time I tried to have some as an adult, I was thwarted by an inability to find the local chain (The Rapid Rabbit) that was advetising all over TV & radio.

My roomie/bestie and I REALLY went looking one of their spots, and never succeeded.
I think the only time I have had rabbit was at a charruscaria. It was delicious--but everything there was.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
Think we have a new favorite. Irish pub exceeded expectations.

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Caesar salad. Bit of a failure as a Caesar salad but amazing smoked chicken salad. Finished off my mother in law's one.

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Steak sandwhich. One of the best ones I've had with great steak fries and aioli.

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Little Miss borings sticky date pudding. She beelines for places with this and Caesar salad.
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My desert was a berry parfait with meringue. Beautiful and reasonably priced.

Minor nitpick was the venue was small most people dining outside.
 



Zardnaar

Legend
Cheap "Chinese".

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I've heard it's actually American. On the plate satay chicken skewer, fried chicken, egg foo young, sweet and sour wontons,

Top container mostly the same with sweet and sour pork on the left. It was average.
 
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Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
For the longest time, sweet & sour pork and shrimp fried rice were two of my benchmark dishes for Chinese restaurants. Sadly, I haven’t found as much good S&S pork lately. It seems to be waning in popularity.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
For the longest time, sweet & sour pork and shrimp fried rice were two of my benchmark dishes for Chinese restaurants. Sadly, I haven’t found as much good S&S pork lately. It seems to be waning in popularity.

It's fairly average and terrible for you.

Went to doctor yesterday. Diet and exercise time.

6:30am went for 30 minutes walk.
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Enjoyed my oats and blueberries for breakfast derp.

"Eat some fish" he suggested. Response "how about vegetarian instead".
 


CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
I was asked to copy this recipe here, from the Hive. It's my recipe for buttermilk biscuits.

CleverBiscuits

Ingredients:
4-1/2 cups of all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
1 teaspoon baking powder [1]
1/2 teaspoon baking soda [1]
1 Tablespoon granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 stick of unsalted butter, frozen solid
2 cups cold buttermilk [2]

Preheat your oven to 425 degrees F / 220 degrees C.

Sift the flour, baking powder, baking soda, sugar, and salt together into a large bowl. Using a box cheese grater, grate the stick of frozen butter directly into the flour mixture. [3] Work the butter into the flour with your fingers, flattening it out and rubbing it all together until it's the consistency of I dunno, rolled oats or dry rice.

Add the buttermilk all at once and mix it with your hands for a few seconds until it's moistened but not quite fully mixed. (Don't worry, you finish mixing it on the countertop.) Then turn it out onto a lightly-floured countertop and pat it out into a rectangle. Fold it in half, press it back out into a rectangle, fold it in half, press it back out into a rectangle...you will need to do this about 3 times, maaaaaaybe 4, just until the dough comes together and you've built up a good number of layers.[4] Don't overdo it or your biscuits will be tough.

Finally, pat it out into one last rectangle about an inch thick, and cut it into squares. [5][6] Place each square on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, spaced about an inch or two apart. Bake for about 15 minutes or until golden brown.

-----

1. Baking soda and baking powder both lose their punch once it's exposed to air. If your leavening agents were opened more than 3 months ago, you might need to double the amounts listed.

2. I don't usually have buttermilk in the fridge, so I use a substitution that my grandma taught me. Put 2 teaspoons of apple cider vinegar in a measuring cup, and then fill it to the 2-cup mark with milk. Use it in place of the buttermilk.

3. It's easier to grip if you coat the frozen stick of butter with the flour from the bowl first.

4. I use a bench scraper to mix, fold, and cut the dough. And sometimes I cut and stack (instead of folding) the dough, if it's too sticky.

5. Why squares? Because it's faster, uses fewer dishes, and round biscuits overwork the dough. Think about it: after you cut out those round biscuits, you have to gather up the scraps and press it out again. And again, and again, until you finally use all of the dough. All of that folding and pressing builds up gluten, and gluten is the difference between fluffy biscuits and dense ones.

6. How big should the squares be? Well that's a question for the ages. I like big biscuits (and I cannot lie), so this amount of dough makes 8 biscuits for me. Most folks would probably cut it into a dozen.

-----

Photo Gallery

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Sift the dry ingredients together.

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Grate the frozen butter into the flour mixture.

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Rub the butter into the flour mixture.

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Add the buttermilk, mix it together, and dump it out.

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Flatten it out into a rectangle...

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...then fold it in half and flatten it out again.

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And again, and again. Three or four times in total.

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Finally, press it out one last time and cut into squares.

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Bake on parchment paper at 425F for about 15-20 minutes.

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Serve with mushroom gravy and fried eggs, or with jam & clotted cream.
 

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Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
NOW what you have to do is take pictures of a batch and post them.

That way, we’ll know what they’re supposed to look like when we get a package of them in the mail.😉
 



Galandris

Foggy Bottom Campaign Setting Fan
"Eat some fish" he suggested. Response "how about vegetarian instead".

I couldn't stand fish as well, because I was only culturally used to cooked fish, until I discovered raw fish, which I love. I know it's strange, but if you've avoided the sashimi/sushi craze out of a disgust from cooked fish, you may want to give it a try. It feels and taste very differently and it may expand your options.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
I couldn't stand fish as well, because I was only culturally used to cooked fish, until I discovered raw fish, which I love. I know it's strange, but if you've avoided the sashimi/sushi craze out of a disgust from cooked fish, you may want to give it a try. It feels and taste very differently and it may expand your options.
Sushi/sashimi is the way I enjoy tuna the most. I barely eat it otherwise, but for the occasional tuna salad.
 


Zardnaar

Legend
Here you go. I also fully-illustrated my recipe above, with photos I took during the process.
View attachment 148541

(Now I'm gonna go clean a whole bunch of butter and dough off of my cell phone...)


Looks very similar to scones. AFAIK they're American scones. Scones are a Scottish thing.

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These ones are savory with cheese.

Biscuits here are cookies. Cookies are cookies as well.

Buttermilk not used much here mostly for American style pancakes.
 

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
You are correct, sir. The American word for scone is Biscuit, and the American word for biscuit is Cookie.

These are technically buttermilk scones. But most folks in the American South don't know what the heck a "scone" is, so I grew up calling them Biscuits.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
That diet word. Roast veggie salad with haloumi cheese and walnuts. Beetroot infused hummus.
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Got most of the ingredients for something similar at home.
 
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