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D&D and the rising pandemic

Janx

Hero
Just learned that one of my friends has it (from up Nort, so no direct risk, though he was gonna ship me something...)

He picked it up from one of his co-workers. Now 3/4 of them tested positive, and the one that didn't is running a 104 temperature (meaning, he's just bad at taking tests). That's the entire work team, so nothing is getting repaired for two weeks. MN says if you don't have a temp after 2 week quarrantine you can go back to work (sounds dumb, why not make them take a test again).

The good news for my friend is he says it's pretty mild, a cough (i heard it). He feels about 85%. He said the other guys seem to have it worse. He's ambulatory and able to play his new x-box (staying quarantined).

Wash your hands
Wear a mask
keep your co-workers away with a 6 foot pipe
 

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MarkB

Legend
A friend of mine had an acute enough case that he was admitted to hospital last week. He's back home now, but as a result of the strain placed on his pancreas, he now has type 1 diabetes. There's hope that as he more fully recovers it may reduce to type 2.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
That posit seems based on the idea that we develop very long lasting immunity from either having it or vaccination. That'd be a great thing, but I don't think it is supported by data yet.
It certainly seems to. Either that, or there’s an assumption that there would be an ongoing annual vaccination program, a la the seasonal flu.

Either way, I’m hoping the paper itself contains a bit more evidence.
 

moriantumr

Explorer
A friend of mine had an acute enough case that he was admitted to hospital last week. He's back home now, but as a result of the strain placed on his pancreas, he now has type 1 diabetes. There's hope that as he more fully recovers it may reduce to type 2.

I hope your friend does get better. Diabetes does not really downgrade from type 1 as that means he no longer produces insulin. Type 2 may vary in how bad it is depending on various factors, but it mostly means that they do not respond to insulin as well as they would normally.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
I hope your friend does get better. Diabetes does not really downgrade from type 1 as that means he no longer produces insulin.

Yes, but if that happens because of some other type of disease or stress, sometimes it can start doing so again. So, maybe some hope.
 


Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
My Congressional Representative is having a phone-based town hall meeting tonight about covid policy and vaccinations. I'll be dialing in to hear what's going on.

The call was mostly to address vaccine efficacy and safety. Nothing monumental.
 

JEB

Adventurer
Pretty good explanation of how you could get the vaccine, but still potentially become an asymptomatic spreader: Can vaccinated people still spread COVID-19? Here’s what we know.

Seems to me that if you follow both shots with an antibody test, and you're producing both necessary types, you're in the clear. (And even if you don't have both antibodies, better to wind up with an asymptomatic case than a symptomatic one. Just means you can't visit Grandma until she gets her vaccination, too.)
 

I'm experiencing an interesting intersection of policy and politic (lower-case p, I promise) in my school district. I work in a very wealthy county, but a few schools (like the one I work in) have a much higher proportion of low-income families than others. In a meeting about vaccines, the superintendent of schools for our county said they would be rolling out vaccines for teachers and staff in alphabetical order by school name. You can tell they picked this in order to be "fair." But there's a big difference between fair and equitable!

One of my coworkers spoke up in a meeting with the superintendent of schools and challenged this, saying it would be better to find another factor (say, number of students with who receive free-or-reduced lunch) to prioritize schools by. After all, we know from multiple studies that low-income families are more likely to live in generational housing, work front-line jobs, and be more susceptible to catching and spreading COVID. Apparently the superintendent was, as they say, shook.

We will see what happens! But I am so proud of my coworker for speaking out. Theoretically I will start getting the vaccine this month or next.
 

My father is still holding on for dear life, as a sudden lung infection caused serious complications (no covid though). He seems stable for the moment, but every night I fear I'll receive a call from the hospital.

He's been moved back to the Intensive Care, which is overloaded with work due to covid. I can tell by the looks on people's faces that everyone is really tired and being pushed to the breaking point. I feel for them.

The dreadful handling of the covid response has just caused the fall of the current Dutch cabinet, among other things. It is just a complete embarassment, and I hope a lot of law suits follow.
 

In a meeting about vaccines, the superintendent of schools for our county said they would be rolling out vaccines for teachers and staff in alphabetical order by school name. You can tell they picked this in order to be "fair." But there's a big difference between fair and equitable!

I see nothing fair or equitable in using alphabetical order for something like this. Good for your coworker for challenging it. Extra points for doing it in a meeting, double points if the meeting was public.
 
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Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
You can tell they picked this in order to be "fair." But there's a big difference between fair and equitable!

Yeah. Unfortunately, a lot of people aren't ready for equitable :/

One of my coworkers spoke up in a meeting with the superintendent of schools and challenged this, saying it would be better to find another factor (say, number of students with who receive free-or-reduced lunch) to prioritize schools by. After all, we know from multiple studies that low-income families are more likely to live in generational housing, work front-line jobs, and be more susceptible to catching and spreading COVID. Apparently the superintendent was, as they say, shook.

That took some bravery. Bully and good luck to them!
 

Zardnaar

Legend
I see nothing fair or equitable in using alphabetical order for something like this. Good for your coworker for challenging it. Extra points for doing it in a meeting, double points if the meeting was public.

It avoids resentment I suppose.

The rich schools get it it's unfair, poor schools get it the rich gets salty.

Is it strictly fair? No but it shouldn't upset to many people (them vs us).
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
Is it strictly fair? No but it shouldn't upset to many people (them vs us).

If risk isn't randomly distributed, but the vaccine is, that means a bunch of folks who don't need it as badly will get it, and a bunch of folks who really ought to have it, won't.

Getting sick when it could be prevented should upset folks.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
If risk isn't randomly distributed, but the vaccine is, that means a bunch of folks who don't need it as badly will get it, and a bunch of folks who really ought to have it, won't.

Getting sick when it could be prevented should upset folks.

You're never gonna be able to have a perfect/fair system and it will have to be to reality.

Personally I figured frontline health people should get it first but some countries priorities are old people.

Prioritizing it on socio economic status is going to lead to more us vs them type stuff so alphabetically while not perfect is fair enough IMHO in the scenario outlined by the poster.

It avoids the I got it and you didn't effect in the same school and I guess it's easier to vaccinate schools all at once school by school.
 

You're never gonna be able to have a perfect/fair system and it will have to be to reality.

Personally I figured frontline health people should get it first but some countries priorities are old people.

Prioritizing it on socio economic status is going to lead to more us vs them type stuff so alphabetically while not perfect is fair enough IMHO in the scenario outlined by the poster.
Man I've just got to disagree with you very strongly. You are prioritizing "not angering people" over helping people who need it most. In any policy discussion, equity means helping those who need the most help first.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
Man I've just got to disagree with you very strongly. You are prioritizing "not angering people" over helping people who need it most. In any policy discussion, equity means helping those who need the most help first.

In theory I agree with you but I do live in a country where schools get ranked by deciles and access to things like student allowances are also income based.

It's quicker and easier to do alphabetically I suppose than try and work out who gets what and people get inventive with work around.

So yeah pragmatic reasons as well. Rock on up to school vaccinate move onto next one.
 

In theory I agree with you but I do live in a country where schools get ranked by deciles and access to things like student allowances are also income based.

It's quicker and easier to do alphabetically I suppose than try and work out who gets what and people get inventive with work around.

So yeah pragmatic reasons as well. Rock on up to school vaccinate move onto next one.
Again I've got to disagree. The county has all the data on the schools, it takes as much time to list them alphabetically as to list them by the number of students receiving free or reduced price lunch (the usual indicator of low-income households). So it doesn't take any more time, it just takes a conscience.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
You're never gonna be able to have a perfect/fair system and it will have to be to reality.

Nobody's asking for perfection.

And, not being able to reach perfection is no excuse for not trying to be better. Using an arbitrary assignment scheme, when some folks are demonstrably at significantly higher risk, is shabby.

It avoids the I got it and you didn't effect in the same school

Please go back and read again - we are talking about vaccinating school faculty and staff, not the students.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
Again I've got to disagree. The county has all the data on the schools, it takes as much time to list them alphabetically as to list them by the number of students receiving free or reduced price lunch (the usual indicator of low-income households). So it doesn't take any more time, it just takes a conscience.

I've already seen arguements on other forums if people complaining about who gets what and when.

Alphabetically is fair in terms of who gets what and when without anyone getting to salty about it.

Unless your name start with Z but who cares about them.?
 

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