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D&D and the rising pandemic

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
And, let’s not forget just how much labour has been automated in the last forty years.

We’ve replaced a Lot of workers already.
Yep. People talk about America’s declining manufacturing output. What many don’t realize is that we’re outproducing the peaks of the 1970s…with a fraction of the workforce.
 

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Zardnaar

Legend
Well has family gathering today with wife's family. Couldn't do it in level 3 and 4 lockdown. 4 weeks of each other's company for the most part.

Everyone hugged me bleah so I told them to make it last until Christmas. Not much of a hugger (except her grandma).

Wife over indulged with her sister hooking into the cider. Oops.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
The UK has twice the population of Canada - still does it in 25 working days once they call the election.

Yes, but note that the UK and Japan are both parliamentary systems, rather than presidential. The Prime Minister doesn't have to try to earn votes from private citizens throughout the country.
 

J.Quondam

CR 1/8
The US also has primaries-- the elections held several months before the "real" one to narrow the field. That primary season stretches out the whole campaign that much more. And the dates on those primaries aren't set in stone; they've been moving earlier for decades.

The other big issue is unlimited money in campaigns, obviously. Once bounded by limited public funds, campaigning has become a multibillion-dollar industry today. There's a clear interest on the part of certain businesses (and the party associates who generally lead them) to stretch the pain out as long as possible.* If all that money was limited by law, that would starve campaigns, and act to concentrate most of it nearer to the actual election when it would do most good.


* There's also the question of what happens to unused campaign funds. Left over pots of cash can be very, umm, "enticing".
 

billd91

Hobbit on Quest (he/him)
The US also has primaries-- the elections held several months before the "real" one to narrow the field. That primary season stretches out the whole campaign that much more. And the dates on those primaries aren't set in stone; they've been moving earlier for decades.

The other big issue is unlimited money in campaigns, obviously. Once bounded by limited public funds, campaigning has become a multibillion-dollar industry today. There's a clear interest on the part of certain businesses (and the party associates who generally lead them) to stretch the pain out as long as possible.* If all that money was limited by law, that would starve campaigns, and act to concentrate most of it nearer to the actual election when it would do most good.


* There's also the question of what happens to unused campaign funds. Left over pots of cash can be very, umm, "enticing".
And the earlier you declare a campaign, the sooner you can use the campaign‘s funds to cover legal expenses. Hence, Trump’s declaration of his re-election campaign so early. That’s also part of the corruption in our system. We have, effectively, a 600 day presidential election super-marathon, and then some people wonder why voters get sick of it and disengage.
 


Eltab

Lord of the Hidden Layer
I would prefer "regional primaries" (such as Super Tuesday) over the current schedule. Indiana (votes in May) rarely has competitive primaries, due to previous candidate attrition. 2016 was an exception; I was tempted to visit all four major candidates' rallies near me, buy a trinket-souvenir from each, and mount them on a plaque.
 


J.Quondam

CR 1/8
They'd be better if you could get them with sprinkles on top!
I wrote a letter to CDC to that effect, but they've callously cold-shouldered me so far.
 

niklinna

Explorer
Well I did just read about how the mRNA vaccines' benefits start to fade after six months or so, and I'm coming up on that. Wondering when I'll be hearing something more formal about booster shot programs.
 


Mikeythorn

Explorer
Well I did just read about how the mRNA vaccines' benefits start to fade after six months or so, and I'm coming up on that. Wondering when I'll be hearing something more formal about booster shot programs.
As I understood the reporting around this, the benefit in terms of “preventing infection” drops after six months (with Pfizer 95% effectiveness drops to 80%), but the benefit in terms of “preventing serious illness” is still there. In other words, after six months you do risk getting Covid, but the risk of getting seriously ill as a result remains very low. I do think the way the story has been covered has not really been clear enough on that latter point.
 


cmad1977

Hero
I have a theory. Rename the Moderna vaccine to something else and market as cattle vitamin supplement or something. Zardocon or whatever.

Don't give it away but charge money for it. Put a disclaimer on it saying that Zardocon absolutely cannot be used for Covid treatment.

Add in something like
“Joe Biden and his cabal say this doesn’t work!”
 

About a month ago some guy was selling a cure for 5G, and I can't help but be a little bit jealous that I didn't think of that.

Also, some folk are selling ordinary usb sticks as anti-5G devices. Stroke of genius.
 




Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
Today's update of stupidity:

The local doctor heading up COVID-19 efforts has been targeted and people have attacked his computer system (disabling it with a virus) along with sending spam, threatening emails, and constant harassing phone calls.

His sin? He said that Joe Rogan and ivermectin was malarkey.

Good times!
 

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