D&D 5E Do you love Awesome Names?

Do you love awesome names?

  • Awesome names are awesome.

    Votes: 50 56.2%
  • D&D is serious.

    Votes: 18 20.2%
  • You lost me at Fonkin Hoddyspeak.

    Votes: 12 13.5%
  • I would never vote in a poll that would allow me to vote in it.

    Votes: 9 10.1%

tuxgeo

Adventurer
"RDC" -- ?

Rae Dawn Chong? "Remote Data Capture?" "Role Data Collectors?" "Regulatory DataCorp?" "Railroad Development Corporation?" (That one would actually fit D&D!)
"Remote Desktop Gateway?"

What I was actually referring to (obliquely, to be sure) was Radon, Argon, and Xenon as being "Noble." As an added bonus, if you divide Xeno-Netherologist (a tribute to Xeno-Ethnologist) differently, then you get Xeno-N : ether : ologist -- and "ether" is just another gas, hence appropriate to an Air Genasi.


Edit to add: Explanations ruin a joke, though. . . .
 
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Colder

Explorer
I have, in my portfolio, one Dwarf Wizard by the name of Professor Orion Ironbrew. That name is my crowning achievement because it contains two metallurgy puns for a total of three references to metal.

I also proudly have a Triton Bard in the works named Ray Pierre. That's a three-fold pun.
 

LarryD

First Post
I like awesome names that show the player put some effort into the naming process. Humor is always appreciated.

I currently have a halfling warlock sage named Tommelin "Tomes" Underboot.

That being said, some of the names WotC comes up for the NPC's and locations are less than to be desired. I get that certain locations and monsters are canon (Juiblex, Gracklstugh, et al), but some are so weirdly spelled and difficult to pronounce, that I end up changing them to keep the game flowing smoothly without stumbling over pronunciation.
 

Istbor

Dances with Gnolls
I can't believe I was allowed to vote in that poll...

Anyhow, for me, it really depends on the vibe of the campaign.

If it is a classic dungeon crawl with towns that basically consist of a general store, a blacksmith, and an Inn/Tavern, bring on the awesomely awesome names!

If the campaign is more about for realz RP and adventure (typically the more low magic settings), then I strongly suggest my players come up with names that are suitable. You know... no Monks named Waym Rock'Et Fyst.

AND! Bonus, if you somehow sneak the awesome name past me, I will generally roll with it. Fair is fair.

It usually also depends on the players. Some people just don't like making punny names, or are incapable of making serious ones.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
"RDC" -- ?

Rae Dawn Chong? "Remote Data Capture?" "Role Data Collectors?" "Regulatory DataCorp?" "Railroad Development Corporation?" (That one would actually fit D&D!)
"Remote Desktop Gateway?"

What I was actually referring to (obliquely, to be sure) was Radon, Argon, and Xenon as being "Noble." As an added bonus, if you divide Xeno-Netherologist (a tribute to Xeno-Ethnologist) differently, then you get Xeno-N : ether : ologist -- and "ether" is just another gas, hence appropriate to an Air Genasi.


Edit to add: Explanations ruin a joke, though. . . .

Yeah, Rae Dawn Chong was who I thought you were referencing. You had me completely turned around.

But sometimes, the jokes we tell to ourselves are actually the best.
 

ScaleyBob

Explorer
I've been fairly guilty for using awesome names both as a player and a GM. Whether it's a bard named Silas Fapnoodle (who was a confidence trickster, and that wasn't really his name - it's an old Con Man trick to use a slightly ridiculous name as it's a distraction), a Minotaur named Mu, or a Dragonborn called Scaley Bob. (Short for Orobertrum Golightly) I've pushed various GMs tolerances over the years. No-ones let me play my Eastern European cleric Healing Serge yet though.

As a GM I've had dwarves from the stronghold Rockfort show up, called Bree, Havarti, Ricotta and Khedda, various Gnomes whose names have later been impossible to spell, and there's currently a Drow ranger NPC called R'uu'zt Ib'Roon turning up. (He used to run a donut shop in Drow Town, before events made him become a hero). I've introduced NPCs whose name is a joke that didn't become obvious until several years later. There's times when it's fun to play the long game.

Silly names can break immersion in a game, but as a GM I've found having a silly or joke or reference name on a villian can be very effective. It can give PCs clues they may realise other wise (I had the Wilberforce-Whately brewers show up, knowing the Players would click to both the Under the Mountain and Lovecraft references), or it can make the horror of what the badguy is doing that more horrifying once the joke wears off.

Oddly enough I've noticed most the players I've gamed with have gone for less fantasy sounding and more real world names as time has gone on.

(And after reading the earlier posts in the thread I want to play a Barbarian called Raging Wankpuppet now. :D)
 
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Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Of course, there are also...risqué names...

The chief question when playing those is whether the PC is aware of the joke or not. Then, whether they appreciate it or not.
 

Lanefan

Victoria Rules
Of course, the acronym "D.R.E.I.D.E.L." would need to have a good meaning behind it...
Wrong setting, and would only be relevant after the fact, but

Dead Rogue Elf In Dead Elf Land

Yeah, not the best.

For a cyborg or similar (with an admittedly limited function set):

Distant-Range Earthbased Independent Drone Echo Locator

Or something like that...
 




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