5E Does your group use feats?

Does your group use feats?


  • Total voters
    124

EzekielRaiden

Explorer
I feel like the question is overly ambiguous, as it can be read (at least) two ways:
1. Does your group permit feats at all?
2. Does your group actively use feats?

I answered the former because I had assumed the question was the former--they've been an option in all the games I've played personally, and I haven't heard any of my friends saying they play in a game where they're banned. That said, for easily the first couple of years, I saw nothing but a string of people pooping on 5e feats and almost-gleefully talking about how they ban feats because they're just the worst™.
 

R_J_K75

Explorer
We have not, mostly because when we started they were all new players to D&D 5e, and any TTRPG. I wanted to keep things as simple and concise as possible, so I didn't add the "feat" optional rule.
I also don't tell new players about them. If players are engaged enough to actually read a PHB and want to use them, I'm happy to allow them. If it's something I as DM introduce without the player asking for it, it's a good bet that the feat will end up being one more ability that player will forget their character has and/or need me to explain over and over again during sessions.
I have only ran (2) 5E campaigns so Im in the same situation as the two I quoted. My players are realatively new and dont own PHBs. I keep things simple but if a player did request to use a feat I wouldnt be opposed to the idea, though as has already been said, theyd forget to use it most likely.
 

Blue

Orcus on a bad hair day
Every single game of 5e I've played allowed feats. Call it five groups worth, when you get rid of player overlap.

When I run, I always allow feats. I also require point-buy. While I love the organic feeling of rolling for every other edition, the Faustian bargain of ASI or feat goes out the window when one player rolled well and others are always playing catch-up.
 

Blue

Orcus on a bad hair day
Feats are always hit or miss; depending on the campaign length, most characters pick up 1 or 2. Primary casters tend to avoid them until their spellcasting ability is at 20, since the desire to maximize save DC outweighs the benefits of most feats.
My anecdotal experience is the opposite. Due to the nature of saves in 5e, it's pretty trivial to hit a weak save if you have a good selection. So casters don't need it to make saves fail and it doesn't get added to damage in most cases, so they often don't go for feats. Casters who need to hit with spell attacks or have limited save selection (like low level bards) still raise it though. I've also seen support casters not worry as much about it. Resilient (CON) and Warcaster (depending on which class) are particular favorites I see taken but not the only one.
 
My anecdotal experience is the opposite. Due to the nature of saves in 5e, it's pretty trivial to hit a weak save if you have a good selection. So casters don't need it to make saves fail and it doesn't get added to damage in most cases, so they often don't go for feats.
I just wanted to note a few things.
1. A higher casting stat helps all saves.
2. It's not like casters really need anything. If they got no ASI's or feats they would still be fine.
3. Attack Rolls for cantrips also scale off higher casting stat.

General Benefits that apply to casting stat include:
1. Higher skills (all casting stats are tied to useful skills)
2. More prepared spells
3. Higher Saves

That's a lot of benefits to simply pass up for extra concentration. IMO you need a good reason to really want the extra concentration.

Casters who need to hit with spell attacks or have limited save selection (like low level bards) still raise it though.
Bards raise it because it increases Bardic Inspiration

I've also seen support casters not worry as much about it. Resilient (CON) and Warcaster (depending on which class) are particular favorites I see taken but not the only one.
Very few casters are better at outright support than at offense or control. The only exception I can think of is the Sorcerer.

However, certain casters like clerics benefit greatly from concentration due to their potential to be in melee and potentially take a lot more attacks. A spirit guardians focused cleric is one of the most likely builds to take warcaster or resilient (con).
 

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